Archive for Natan

Everybody’s a Critic

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on January 30, 2016 by dcairns

Dead Critics D Cairns from David Cairns on Vimeo.

So, I may have mentioned that I directed twenty seconds of the bottom right-hand corner of CLOUD ATLAS…

The filmmakers wanted a fast montage showing the book Knuckle Sandwich by Dermot Hoggins (Tom Hanks, in maybe the best of the film’s many makeups) becoming a runaway bestseller after Hoggins murders his only reviewer by chucking him off a tower block. Tom Tykwer seemed to find the idea of killing a critic highly amusing, so I went along with that when I took the job of directing

I think enough time has passed that I can post the video of my bit. If you see the movie, the splitscreen goes by so fast and in a babel of sound that you wouldn’t really know it had happened. Looking at the piece now, I don’t like it too much — the “satirical” tone is unconvincing and it’s not clear what kind of show this is meant to be. It totally lacks the satirical authenticity of a Brass Eye, for instance. I do think we could probably have done something in between our minute-long first cut and the twenty-second final version, which might have played better, but a job’s a job.

There was a suggestion that all the split-screen segments might turn up as extras on the Blu-ray but I don’t think this ever happened — correct me if I’m wrong.

Jo Gil and Nelisa Alcalde were my ace team.

The Knuckle Sandwich plotline of CLOUD ATLAS also features Niall Fulton as one of Hanks’ brothers, marking a pleasing connection with LET US PREY, NATAN, CRY FOR BOBO and THE NORTHLEACH HORROR, in which he also appears, playing, respectively, a psychotic GP, a papier-mache film producer, a Keystone cop and a Nazi officer.

My review of CLOUD ATLAS, posted from the Dublin International Film Festival where NATAN was also showing, is here.

I haven’t seen anything.

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2016 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2016-01-13-21h03m01s20

What do you expect? I’ve been filming all week. But now we’ve wrapped and I plan to catch up with THE REVENANT and HATEFUL EIGHT and some nicer older movies.

Above is a frosty image from Lev Kuleshov’s 1926 icecapade PO ZAKONU, because it reminds me of the hardships we faced out on a freezing hill.

Meanwhile, Sight & Sound have published their lists of best DVDs of the year —

Regular Shadowplayer Anne Billson and Trevor Johnstone both list DRAGON INN, to which I contributed a video essay.

Philip Concannon and Sam Wigley go for A NEW LEAF, which has another vid essay by me.

Sam Dunn and Neil Sinyard include SECONDS, which has a text piece I wrote.

David Thompson cites DIARY OF A LOST GIRL — another video essay, written by me and narrated by Fiona.

Michael Brooke and Philip Kemp each include WOODEN CROSSES, again from Masters of Cinema, produced by Bernard Natan.

Most exciting of all, Pamela Hutchinson of The Guardian and Silent London lists NATAN itself, the documentary I made with Paul Duane and which is available from Amazon.fr.

It’s official — I have been working too hard.

 

 

From Angels to the Angel

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on December 15, 2015 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2015-12-14-20h44m28s222

Off to London today for costume fittings — some of our lead actors in my new film, THE NORTHLEACH HORROR, will be trying on clothes, and it’s my first chance to meet a couple of them, Raechel McGinn and Freddie Fox. Fitting at Angels, the top cossie shop, and then off to the Angel, Islington, to crash on the couch of an agreeable ex-student. I’ll be back tomorrow around midnight. Maybe I’ll even have seen a movie I can write about.

Yesterday was spent on the set, where we are transforming a big square room in the old Royal High School into a subterranean laboratory in Gloucestershire in 1941. Thanks to amazing favours by location owners, props houses and a talented crew working for between nothing and next-to-nothing, work progressed well, apart from one poor volunteer gluing his thumb to his forefinger. With tragic irony, his attempts to signal the problem resulted only in an “A-OK” gesture.

He’s fine now — a little surgical spirit is the thing, if you ever get into this jam.

You’ll be hearing a lot about this film of mine in the coming weeks/months/years, but rather than bore you with that before we’ve properly started making it, here’s a link to a fabulous article on Bernard Natan, just published in The Guardian by Pamela Hutchinson of Silent London. It makes favourable mention of NATAN, the film Paul Diane and I made on the subject, which is available to order on Amazon.fr.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 652 other followers