Archive for The Late Show: The Late Films Blogathon

It’s Later Than I Thunk

Posted in FILM with tags on November 21, 2017 by dcairns

Here are some banners. The first two are from Abel Gance’s swan song, THE BATTLE OF AUSTERLITZ.

Next up, Fritz Lang’s penultimate opus, THE INDIAN TOMB. It’s time, once again, for THE LATE SHOW: The Late Movies Blogathon. And I am asking you, yes YOU! to get involved and write something about a filmmaker or star’s last or near-last work.

John Cromwell’s THE GODDESS follows. Not his very last, but his last Hollywood film as director, and subject of a piece which prompted some valuable reflections from the director’s son.

And finally, MIRACLES FOR SALE, Tod Browning’s delightful final entry, which Fiona, my good lady wife, wrote up last year.

Consider yourselves nudged! David E, Phoebe, Matthew, Brandon, Gareth, the lovely strange Joseph Breen fans, all of you! I hope to hear from you soon.

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Untaken

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on December 5, 2016 by dcairns

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I can recall my New york chum Jaime Christley, years and years ago before I’d actually met him, expressing dissatisfaction with Bunuel’s penultimate opus, THE PHANTOM OF LIBERTY, arguing that with its endless parade of French stars, it resembles a gallic TOWERING INFERNO. I suggested instead that THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL is the Bunuel film closer to the Irwin Allen-John Guillerman group jeopardy nonsense — a bunch of rich people in evening dress attend a swank party and are mysteriously unable to leave.

At any rate, I rather like PHANTOM, preferring it to the follow-up, THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE, which I really think would be pretty desultory had not Bunuel fired poor Maria Schneider and happened upon the bold idea of replacing her with two unalike actors, who alternate throughout at random. It’s a terrific trick: you know he’s doing it, but it’s really hard to concentrate on the constant substitution, since the continuity of narrative and mise-en-scene keeps telling our subconscious that it’s positively the same dame.

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While OBJECT has a great story idea and a great casting gimmick, PHANTOM, like DISCRETE CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE before it, has a ton of ideas and a ton of gimmicks, many of them brilliant. It lacks the unifying conceit of its predecessor, it’s true (friends try to have dinner; fail) but the way it weaves its fragmented sketches together, and the way some of them return for encores, I find dazzling. Another skeptical friend dismisses it as “slow Monty Python,” but the leisurely pace for me is part of the charm, contributing to the deadpan effect. Skits unfold pedantically, as if nothing odd were happening at all.

The missing child scenario is probably the best — every parents’ nightmare gets played out perfectly straight, save for one rogue element — the missing child is right there all the time. Characters can see and talk to her, and she talks right back. But they still believe she#s missing. Bunuel and his co-scenarist. Jean-Claude Carriere, play this stuff out as naturally as possible, with just the one alteration to the norm which makes the whole ritual of questioning teachers and putting out an All Points Bulletin completely nonsensical.

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Best of all is the unexpected pay-off several sequences later when the detective attempts to explain how the child has been recovered. “This ought to be good,” we think, awaiting the impossible explanation. But some loud extraneous noise drowns the guy out as he reaches the crucial portion (after an incongruous opening about the inhabitants of a small town being awoken by a deafening blast). It reminds me of Leo G. Carroll’s spy plot exposition in NORTH BY NORTHWEST, which Hitchcock wisely smothered in aircraft sound to save the audience having to listen to some boring information. Information is not drama.

In Bunuel’s version, we really want to hear the explanation, which seems set to be very dramatic indeed, so it’s hilarious when he frustrates us. Like the hot-and-cold temptress of THAT OBSCURE OBJECT, the film keeps teasing us with narrative resolutions, then crosses its legs tightly when we get close to satisfaction.

The Last Battle

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on December 1, 2016 by dcairns

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Thanks to Reveletor60 for supplying me with a subtitled copy of Abel Gance’s not-even-final-film AUSTERLITZ — so this edition of The Late Show: The Late Movies Blogathon can begin with an edition of The Forgotten on that august subject. Click here.

I’ve been really lazy and haven’t chased anyone up to contribute this year. Still, I hope there will be entries. Use the comments section to announce them, or send me texts and I’ll publish here.

[Cold, Felliniesque wind whistles through…]