Archive for King Kong

Eastern Western

Posted in FILM with tags , on August 11, 2016 by dcairns

o

Kaiju are just too big, aren’t they? Fay Wray could fit in Kong’s hand, meaning there could be meaningful monster-human interaction, but at 300ft tall or whatever he’s meant to be, Godzilla is just too enormous to be aware of humans as anything more than moving microdots. He didn’t even notice when Raymond Burr was slotted into his movie. And if you can overlook Raymond Burr, you have a size problem.

Mind you, I’m not saying this list of cowboy movies starring giant Japanese monsters would solve the problem.

JOHNNY GHIDORA

VARAN FROM LARAMIE

A FISTFUL OF DORATS

SHE WORE A YELLOW RODAN

TWO RODAN TOGETHER

LITTLE BIG MANDA

MATANGO NOTORIOUS

THE ASSASSINATION OF JET JAGUAR BY THE COWARD RAINBOW MOTHRA

MCCABE AND MRS MINILLA

DESTOROYAH RIDES AGAIN

GIGAN AT THE O.K. CORRAL

PAINT YOUR BARAGON

GODZILLA FORGIVES… I DON’T!

Uncensored

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on April 26, 2016 by dcairns

Dietrich 03

Staying with the pre-code theme, Limerwrecks has been focussing on the years 1930-1934.

I weigh in on DISHONORED here, LADIES THEY TALK ABOUT here, THE SCARLET EMPRESS here, something fairly non-specific here but we’ve gone with RED DUST, and KING KONG again here. And there’s more where that came from!

Kong Dies At The End

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on October 25, 2014 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h10m10s226

A more accurate title for John Guillermin and Dino de Laurentiis’s KING KONG LIVES! would be KING KONG DIES AGAIN! since that is what happens. I feel no particular guilt at this fairly colossal spoiler, since KKL is not only very terrible, it’s also unusually boring for a terrible film. The action is repetitive — Kong rescues his mate at the end of Act I, then again at the end of Act II — and very generic. The characters are flat — so flat that James Cameron could recycle the hardass military guy in AVATAR, put him in 3D, and he was still so flat he could slide under doors like an envelope.

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h11m13s89

“You’ve heard of the Green Berets? We’re the Raspberry Berets.”

Director John Guillermin does achieve one of the most memorable moments of his career — which includes some genuinely interesting, and well-made, films — during the sequence where Kong receives an artificial heart the size of a Fiat 500. Beginning with the hairy monarch lying comatose in a lab is not such an awful idea, if you have to begin such a venture at all (and clearly you don’t, so DON’T) — it allows Carlo Rambaldi to create another forty-foot mechanical ape, one which doesn’t have to do anything, but which human actors can interact with, thus convincing the audience that the gorilla really is as big as he’s supposed to be (a conviction shattered as soon as he gets up and starts ambling around miniature landscapes, but it was nice while it lasted). BUT — not content with staging a scene in which the $7, 000,000 artificial heart (this bionic Kong has to go one million better than Steve Austin) is winched over to the rather restive patient (should he really be tossing his head about like that if anesthetized?) — not content with generating bogus suspense by have the crane nearly break and drop the expensive, heavy organ straight through the slumbering monster’s abdomen — not content with showing us one of those inflating rubgy football things used in anesthesis, and having it be normal size when surely it ought to be a veritable Hindenberg — Guillermin throws in a shot taken from inside Kong, looking out of his thoracic cavity towards the assembled medical team and the descending cyber-pump.

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h08m33s45

“A new low in taste,” was the phrase used gleefully by Martin Scorsese to describe the shot of a shark’s prey being consumed, taken from inside the shark’s mouth, in JAWS 3 — in 3D. But can that truly compete with a view from an ape’s thoracic cavity? I see now why Guillermin hasn’t made another film since — how to top this? Perhaps by filming out of Dracula’s arse as he breaks wind while stooping to bite a victim.

Fiona: “Why do they want to save Kong’s life after the mass destruction he caused in the last film?”

Me: “They like him.”

The more interesting aspects of the film’s deep badness are the points where it transcends the moronic and achieves solid stupidity. A stupidity you could walk about on; stupidity that could safely take a man’s weight.

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h06m51s37

A kind of madness of stupidity, a mania of the dumb, seizes some filmmakers in the process of telling a genre story. The makers of this movie knew perfectly well that Kong, having fallen off the World Trade Center, couldn’t be alive, wouldn’t be helped by a robot heart, or by a blood transfusion from a giant female gorilla who doesn’t necessarily have the same blood type anyway, and that he wouldn’t have been able to walk even with such curative treatment after spending ten years in a coma. They knew that it isn’t full moon every night, yet it is in this movie, even though the action covers months. They also knew, one hopes, the simple biological fact that animals need to eat, yet “Lady Kong” goes on hunger strike when she’s locked in a missile silo by the army, and when Linda Hamilton asks “How long has she been like this?” she is told “Three or four months.” Yet not only does Lady Kong not die of starvation, she is able to give birth to a child at the end of it all.

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h09m10s154

When the Son of Kong is eventually born, he is played by another actor in an ape suit, who is cradled in the animatronic Kong hand built by Carlo Rambaldi. So the Kongs, the fifty-foot ape couple, have a child who is only about six feet tall, if that, and who is as active and agile as an adult (and isn’t covered in icky amniotic fluid and blood.

Linda Hamilton sighs a lot and shakes her head to let us know she’s not happy with the way things are going, most of the time, and who can blame her?

Apart from the various stupidities, the film only really startles one awake when something particularly vile happens, as when Kong snaps a man in two; or some distressing attempt at humour is made, as when he pick a baseball cap from between his teeth after eating a man. And the whole Kong family still keep grinning, having learned nothing from the first go-round.

vlcsnap-2014-10-25-10h09m41s204

Boldly, Lady Kong is played by a man, making this a rather forward-looking same-sex marriage, or at any rate civil partnership.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 726 other followers