Archive for Edinburgh International Film Festival

Teahouse of the Rising Sun

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 28, 2021 by dcairns

The great Max Ophuls’ career was not only itinerant — Germany, France, Italy, the US, and back to France — it was very variable in quality. LIEBELEI is a masterpiece, but most of his first European films are either flawed or minor. Then he makes mostly masterpieces in Hollywood and returns to Europe to make four more.

I saw the first twenty minutes of YOSHIWARA, a French pic from 1937, at Edinburgh International Film Festival in 2000, but I had to leave early. Shane Danielsen, curator of the retrospective, warned us beforehand that we’d probably never get a chance to see this film again. Times have changed — Gaumont have released the film on Blu-ray.

The film, based on a French novel, creates a fantasy of Japan in the lead-up to the Russo-Japanese war — intended by the Tsar as “a short, victorious war” to boost his popularity and trumped up for no good reason, it turned into a fiasco which hastened his downfall. This movie presents a fanciful theory of how faulty intelligence led to that outcome. There’s a romantic triangle — rickshaw driver and artist Sessue Hayakawa is hopelessly in love with geisha girl, formerly daughter of a noble house, Michiko Tanaka, and she’s in love with Russian naval officer Pierre Richard-Willm, who’s basically a spy. The Japanese secret service forces Hayakawa to spy on his rival, thus endangering his sweetheart.

A kind of whiplash is introduced by the fact that Hayakawa and Tanaka are real Japanese people and the other locals are played by very gallic impostors. The Russians are all French, and I’m pretty sure Hayakawa is dubbed, unless his French was fantastically better than his English as heard later in BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI.

The set and costume design is fabulous, the social observation less so: geishas are synonymous with prostitutes in this vision of the east, as a for-instance. Yoshiwara exists behind an unscalable wall with a huge gate, almost like Skull Island (and Kurosawa would import that design, which apparently never existed in real feudal Japan, for the forts in his films such as THRONE OF BLOOD.

Michiko Tanaka was never really a movie star outside of this one film, but she’s startlingly beautiful. Sessue Hayakawa is pretty impressive too, and Willm is striking — I should see LE ROMAN DE WERTHER, his other Ophuls, a sort of farrago of Goethe which Ophuls rather regretted — he died with a copy of The Sorrows of Young Werther by his bedside.

The melodrama is slushy — an imaginary trip to the opera looks forward to the phantom ride of LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN, but is embarrassingly gushy and frenetic — but the visual direction is gorgeous. Watching it alongside THE RECKLESS MOMENT brought out all sorts of similarities, including the way the director will follow actors up flights of stairs and along catwalks in unbroken shots. A dynamic chase is staged in a hectic flurry of incredibly precise movements, filmed through swathes of occluding foliage. It’s almost frustrating — Ophuls regularly brought genius to the staging of stories carpentered together with little talent. But I guess it does mean that by the time he got good scripts, he was more than ready.

Square Eyes

Posted in FILM with tags , on August 27, 2021 by dcairns

My poorest ever showing at Edinburgh International Film Festival — a single outdoor screening in St Andrews Square.

The film of course was CASABLANCA and the screen did a great job blasting it out in the face of blazing sunshine. The technology for outdoor screenings has improved immensely seemingly in just the last few years. Unfortunately the people operating them have remained at the same evolutionary stage so we had to watch the film in the wrong aspect ratio, and when we reported it they didn’t know what we were talking about. “It’s coming straight out of the DVD.”

DVD?

The outdoor screenings are always of popular favourites — CASABLANCA was the oldest film shown, SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN the second — they’re only sort of a part of the Film Fest and I don’t think anyone there is to blame, except maybe they should supervise more tightly.

A baby seagull landed on the screen at an opportune moment.

At the indoor events we really should have booked early for ANNETTE and LA STRADA but pandemic inertia and out-of-touchness prevented it.

Still, we enjoyed our revisit to studio North Africa, and a chance to see watch-party chums Donald and Nicola on the next deck chairs over.

Online

Posted in FILM with tags , on September 2, 2020 by dcairns
The great Chaplin outbreak

I still have a couple of Henry Fondas to write up from Il Cinema Ritrovato online, but now there’s just time, while I’m busy with a Sight & Sound article (more later), to look back on the streaming film festival experience.

Watching three or four films or shorts programmes a day, the forty euro charge wound up fairly cheap. Of course we saved on the expense and hassle of flights and accommodation. But of course we missed out on the sunshine, conviviality, great food and Aperol spritzes of Bologna. Still, it is possible that if the possibility of online participation continued, some years we might stay home so as to attend the Edinburgh International Film Festival (which I miss badly), enjoying the rain, conviviality, home cooking and canned lager, and stream Bologna at the same time.

The streaming movies looked great, though there were a few interruptions to the flow, probably caused by our lousy internet service. There was a cross-section of different strands. I realize rights issues must make things difficult, but I was impressed at the number of Hollywood movies included. Ideally I’d like more of the shorts to stream, but some of those aren’t digitized I guess.

Still, it has to be said, not only can nothing replace the grand open-air screenings in the Piazza Maggiore, but nothing can replace the tiniest, stuffiest indoor screening at the Sala Scorsese with an overlong intro, live translation from a stressed-sounding woman blaring through an earpiece, and even the most basic piano accompaniment (and all the accompanists are well above basic level). More than any other film festival I know, Il Cinema Ritrovato is a LIVE EVENT.

Films + human beings.