Archive for the FILM Category

The Sunday Intertitle: The Black Hole

Posted in FILM, Painting with tags , , , , , , , on August 2, 2015 by dcairns

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Today’s intertitle ought really to say “Attempting to recover installation,” since I made the mistake of trying to get Windows 10 on my laptop and now I have a black screen with that frustrating sentence superimposed at bottom, possibly forever. Ironically, I had just completed a funding application involving a film where a group of characters get trapped in a black void…

So we all shuffle over to Fiona’s laptop and greet Sydney Chaplin (rapist and cannibal) in THE BETTER ‘OLE, a Warners Vitaphone soundie and one of I imagine very few films to be adapted from a single panel cartoon. The WWI ‘toon by Bruce Bairnsfather, which somehow became a world-famous sensation, is shown here ~

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And here’s the movie’s version ~

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Script is by director Charles (Chuck) Reisner and Darryl Francis Zanuck. Francis, eh?

Syd was versatile, I have to admit. Able to look as handsome as his brother, arguably, he often hid behind a walrus moustache — see his expert turn as the cookie vendor Charlie robs blind in A DOG’S LIFE. Here, he has what seems to be a substantial make-up job to turn him into “Old Bill” (Syd was just 41). Bulbous nose, baggy eyes, dolorous demeanor. I notice that Syd was in his brother’s SHOULDER ARMS too, so he had WWI movie experience, albeit as a German.

Am I missing any well-known examples of movies based on single-panel cartoons?

In other news, I saved a man’s life yesterday. Well, no good deed goes unpunished…

A man can acquire The Knack

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on August 1, 2015 by dcairns

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Hell with it — I’m moving Film Club back to Monday, August 10th, so that any New Yorkers who go see it at the Walter Reade Theater on the 8th can join in.

Lester season! And yes, I did look into the price of flights, but there’s no way, man.

If you’d like recommendations — obviously THE KNACK, the Beatles films… damnit, I like all of them. RETURN OF THE MUSKETEERS is problematic, but the previous two MUSKETEERS films are unmissable. Most of these are on 35mm, which is wonderful, depending on print quality — this is a chance to see the cinematography of David Watkin and Nicolas Roeg on the big screen. And Laszlo Kovacs and Gilbert Taylor and Gerry Fisher. Don’t miss PETULIA and ROBIN AND MARIAN. See JUGGERNAUT and enjoy the late Mr. Sharif, being a very good sport in a total cold-fish role. What a treat!

Also recommended — Ann Jellicoe’s Shelley, or The Idealist. I picked it out the library because it has an intro by the author where she talks about The Knack and THE KNACK… AND HOW TO GET IT. It’s quite brilliant — Lester might like it — history, atheism and comedy, three of his favourite things. It reads more like a Lester film than the earlier play.

It seems to me the Royal Court playwrights, including frequent Lester collaborator Charles Wood, are being rather neglected. Their stuff is still regarded as kind of modern, so why produce that when you could produce NEW modern works? But revivals of Look Back In Anger just show what a period piece it is. Shelley, like Wood’s H, Dingo and Veterans, are set in the past, slightly or distantly or sort-of, and still read fresh. There should be a space for them.

 

A One-Way Ticket to Pakulaville

Posted in FILM, Politics, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2015 by dcairns

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I watched THE PARALLAX VIEW, directed by Alan Pakula — excuse me, Alan *J* Pakula — because I figured it might serve as a surprise entry to Seventies Sci-Fi Week —

— one should always have Surprise Entries. I remember reading the line-up of a season of science fiction films programmed by David Cronenberg, and they were ALL surprise entries, from Robert Wise’s HELEN OF TROY (“Indistinguishable from FLASH GORDON” — nice try, but FLASH goes like a train — maybe SIGN OF THE CROSS would be a better fit) to TAXI DRIVER (“A better version of BLADE RUNNER than BLADE RUNNER.”)

— you see, I was remembering the Parallax Test scene and thought it was a movie about brainwashing, but I think that scene is probably just testing the subject’s emotional responses to words and images. It’s not the full Ludovico. To be a science-fiction film, the movie would have to take the speculations around Lee Harvey Oswald and Sirhan Sirhan and spin them into an elaborate speculative fiction. And the speculation would have to be based on altering present conditions. The Manchurian Candidate does this. It’s based on the way captured Americans were “brainwashed” — ie tortured into submission, in reality — during the Korean War, but it speculates that somebody could be mentally adjusted and become an unconscious assassin, a human bomb waiting for a post-hypnotic suggestion to trigger detonation. That phenomenon had never been witnessed — so far as we know — so the Condon book and Frankenheimer-Axelrod film could be termed sci-fi.

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THE PARALLAX VIEW instead shows an organisation recruiting subjects who would make suitable lone gunmen, based on their psychological profiles, and also supplying patsies. No such organisation is known to exist — apart from possibly the CIA and a few organisations like it — but it certainly COULD exist. No adjustment of present social conditions or our understanding of scientific principles or our mastery of scientific techniques would be necessary for this film to come true.

Now I just scared myself.

The reason I misremembered the movie, which I have seen several times, is that it’s somehow elusive in the memory. And a little hard to concentrate on, as if the Hitchcockian, paranoid thriller were a slightly inapt match for Pakula’s offbeat, observational style (and we should maybe refer to the director as Pakula-Willis, since cinematographer Gordon Willis is such a central, essential contributor to Pakula’s best work). The script is by David Giler and Lorenzo Semple, with uncredited assist by Warren Beatty’s close buddy Robert Towne.

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I had forgotten some good stuff — Hume Cronyn plays by far the best character (almost the only character, after Paula Prentiss’s one scene). I had forgotten there’s a hyperbolic barroom brawl that wouldn’t look out of place in a Hal Needham movie. I remembered that there was a car chase that’s similarly out-of-place. But the good action stuff is when Pakula defies genre by sitting the camera well back and calmly watching, chin resting on knuckles, as a human life is snuffed. The skirmish atop the Space Needle at the start, and the floundering fight in the flooding river, a huge damn venting a wall of spume in the background. The documentary distance adds a sense of reality, and therefore danger. (Obviously Pakula is doing this partly so he can cover up Beatty’s substitution by stunt double Craig Baxley — excuse me, Craig *R* Baxley — but the point is he makes a stylistic feature out of it.)

A different kind of distance afflicts our relationship with Warren Beatty’s character, a classic seventies alienated douchebag — Beatty cheerfully plays his more obnoxious traits to the hilt. The fact that he spends very little time in the movie with anyone he can relate to at all makes it a little hard to see him as other than an articulated shape. And I think the film has a hard job recovering from the Parallax Test in the middle, since it’s such a tour-de-force. We go from a montage masterpiece back into what is merely a very  good movie. And nobody seems to know who is responsible. Don Record did the title designs and seems to have had a role designing it. John W. Wheeler edited the movie as a whole. Did they collaborate or was the whole sequence farmed out to Record?

It reminds me of Chuck Braverman’s amazing opening sequence to SOYLENT GREEN, which IS a seventies sci-fi movie.

Now go do what you have to do.

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