Archive for Raoul Walsh

Apocalypse of an Angel

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on October 2, 2018 by dcairns

THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT is a 1945 comedy-fantasy which became a punchline in its own right when star Jack Benny took to joking about how terrible it was. Decades later, Jon Stewart would revitalise this self-deprecatory schtick by ruefully trashing his own work in DEATH TO SMOOCHIE. But, in fact, neither film is terrible — at worst, they’re unsuccessful but interesting.

THBAN fits snugly into the ’40s fantasy cycle involving the afterlife, which seems to have been some kind of reaction to the mass-slaughter of WWII. Though the Heaven in this film is relatively inactive as a destination for the dead — the traffic is all the other way, with various angels descending to Earth to trigger the planet’s destruction. But, just like in the simultaneously made A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, Heaven is portrayed as a vast bureaucracy. This is all a dream, of course, not even an ambiguous one like AMOLAD — the whole movie is a dream wrapped inside a slender framing structure in which nothing really happens.

But setting aside the frame, the main story is an odd one in which we are supposed to root for Jack Benny to destroy our planet. Mind you, what the film shows of New York would seem to support such a plan — the place comes across as a stinking vespiary writhing with brats, crooks, sneaks and rich creeps. With the mild-mannered Benny getting scammed and pushed around by just about everyone he meets, it’s easy to root for him to bring about the End of Days.

We get two pseudo-Harold Lloyd skyscraper dangling routines, both inserted to build further suspense as Benny tries to kill us all. We’re supposed to feel suspense (and laugh) both about whether he’ll plunge to his death on the sidewalk and whether he’ll sound the final trump and destroy the world.

It’s all fairly manic — like a kind of Thorne Smith story on PCP — the music score never lets up, and we even get the Loony Tunes theme tune at a carnival — and fairly funny. There are also some SPECTACULAR special effects. The skyscraper stuff is inventive, with lots of miniatures, dolls and rear projection, but I’m a purist about these things and the only trickery I’ll accept in these scenes is the perspectival illusions achieved by Harold Lloyd building sets on real rooftops. But the fake cityscapes are nice,

It’s the afterlife stuff that really impresses. I saw this recently excerpted in Joe Dante’s THE MOVIE ORGY and it blew my mind. The vast celestial orchestra looks at first like it might be a patchwork made up of different bits of live-action footage, duped and conjoined to turn one big crowd into a VAST one. But then the camera soars over the heavenly throng and I couldn’t work out HOW this was being done.

Seeing it again in sharper definition at least some of the technique was revealed — Fiona spotted it first. though the front rows appear to be real, a considerable crowd, the angels further back are cut-outs. It’s beautiful, like a 3D moving Sgt. Peppers album cover.

The whole strange thing is directed by Raoul Walsh, and it’s quite far from the kind of film he’s celebrated for most, but his career does contain a lot of really odd outliers.

When you gaze into THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT, THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT gazes also into you.

The film has an unusually distinguished cast, featuring Joseph Tura, Louisa van der Luyden, Mme. Hellene de Bursac, Albert Van Cleve, Hillary Ames, Scattergood Baines, ‘Teddy Roosevelt” Brewster, J. Pinkerton Snooperton, Mrs. Gloria Teasdale, Loyal Muke, Mrs. Bundy the celebrated ornithologist and Mr. ‘Moose’ Malloy.

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Look the other fellow in the eye

Posted in FILM with tags , , , on August 30, 2016 by dcairns

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Yes, I want to write something about Gene Wilder.

Meanwhile, over at The Chiseler, James Cagney features in The Greatest Close-Up of 1939. Click.

Putting Pants on Raoul

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on June 11, 2014 by dcairns

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Enjoying very much Raoul Walsh’s autobio, Each Man In His Time. The accounts of Walsh’s early days as a sailor, cowboy and assistant to a doctor and an undertaker in Utah are extremely diverting, full of rowdiness and black comedy just like a Walsh film. How truthful they are is hard to assess, but a clue may be found in the account of the making of REGENERATION, Fox Pictures’ gangster epic which Walsh directed, the first gangster feature film (possibly).

Walsh has fun recounting the filming of the ferry fire sequence, for which a ragged army of volunteers were rounded up at the docks: their role, to leap into the water from the deck of the ferry. Walsh says he hired a couple of ruffians to ensure that everybody evacuated as planned — headfirst if necessary. The men did their job so well they even chucked the Fox moneyman overboard, pay-satchel and all, causing Walsh to fear for his neck if the cash were lost and he had nothing to pay his unruly and sodden background artists at day’s end.

This all happens in a chapter entitled The Censor Will Hang Us, and the reason for that title is soon supplied. When the rushes are viewed, it became apparent that numerous of the ladies leaping into the drink were without underwear. Walsh claims that the shots were too intricate to simply trim out the offending frames, and in desperation he rushed the footage to a specialist “negative doctor,” who told him at once that the job was impossible.

“‘Nothing’s impossible,’ I barked at him, ‘Do you remember the time Dolly Larkin ripped her blouse and her tits fell out? You fixed that one.'”

Walsh reports that after working all night, the visual effects artist successfully superimposed undergarments on all the bottomless leapers, ‘except some of the women looked as though they were wearing diapers.’

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This story struck me as unlikely, though I recalled learning from The RKO Story that traveling mattes were employed to conceal some of Jane Russell’s cleavage in THE OUTLAW after the censor objected. But a cursory glance at REGENERATION shows that the extreme long shots of leaping ladies show no billowing skirts, no nudity and no underpants, superimposed, hand-painted or otherwise. I expect probably there was some troublesome footage, and I expect it was simply deleted. Walsh the storyteller couldn’t leave it at that, and how many people were going to see a copy of REGENERATION and catch him confabulating?

vlcsnap-2014-06-11-10h21m44s12My second below-the-belt piece in as many days. What’s that all about?