Archive for Marlon Brando

Happy Actorday!

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on April 4, 2018 by dcairns

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It’s Brando’s birthday! In celebration, Criterion are boosting an extract from my ONE-EYED JACKS video essay here.

Meanwhile, Daniel Riccuito, over at The Notebook, sings the praises of a MUCH more significant thespian — Dead End Kid Frankie Darro. I have contributed a few words, and as usual, readers are invited to see if they can separate my wheat from Danny’s other wheat.

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Rashomon Amour

Posted in Dance, Fashion, FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 3, 2018 by dcairns

Fiona was VERY taken with Kay Kendall’s drunk scene in LES GIRLS. I was too, but also taken aback. We’ve all learned, supposedly, to be more sensitive and thus to be a touch affronted at Hollywood’s flip treatment of alcoholism. But I find I’m rarely that bothered by Arthur Housman doing his detailed dipso routine in Laurel & Hardy films. Kendall playing a solitary drinker who gets riotously blotto a la Judith Hearne is a bit stronger. But she does play it magnificently.

Lots to enjoy in this one, even if George Cukor could never be bothered staging his own musical numbers: here he passes them to Jack Cole, so they’re in safe hands.

It’s all a meditation on the nature of truth and the elusiveness of reality, conducted by MGM. Like RASHOMON with better songs. Although not many of the numbers are that memorable — the set design makes the biggest splash when Gene Kelly pastiches Brando in THE WILD ONE.

 

It’s Kelly’s last real Hollywood musical leading man role, and already he’s somewhat sidelined: you might think making him the object of desire for three glamorous women (Kendall, Mitzi Gaynor and the more obscure Taina Elg, who is actually very good despite the Scrabble-score name — “She’s got a great LOOK!” diagnosed Fiona — some credit belongs to Orry Kelly here). The narrative emerges via three competing testimonies in a libel case, which ought by rights to be delivered by les girls, but Kelly still had enough clout to elbow Gaynor out the way and deliver the denouement himself.

A sexy masterstroke by the naughty Orry — backless dresses that manage to make perfectly decent leggings look as rude as bare bottoms ~

The story is by Vera Caspary of LAURA fame, who must deserve some of the credit for the waspish dialogue. Brandishing a placard at us declaring WHAT IS TRUTH?, the  movie can seem at times too impressed with its own cleverness — a religious sandwich-board would be unlikely to quote Pontius Pilate, methinks — but it’s tastefully lavish, oddball and hugely entertaining, which is what we wanted over the festive period.

Last Christmas Fiona had acute depression, anxiety, horrible medication side-effects, and we both had flu and chronic insomnia and the cat was dying. This year Fiona only broke her ankle slightly so it can be considered a great improvement.

War Films

Posted in FILM, Mythology, Science with tags , , , , , on December 14, 2017 by dcairns

I picked up an intriguing oddity in a charity shop — Myths and Legends of the First World War, by James Hayward. I wasn’t particularly expecting cinematic connections, but there turned out to be several. A juicy one comes when Hayward is covering the tale of the Angel of Mons, a weird bit of mystical nonsense originated by author Arthur Machen in a short story, The Bowmen, which imagined the archers of Agincourt appearing in spectral form to assist the British Expeditionary Force during its retreat from Mons during WWI. The fictional story somehow got regurgitated as fact, a kind of trench urban legend or FOAF (Friend Of A Friend) tale, with the figure of St. George morphing over time into an actual angel bestriding the battlefield. Over to Hayward —

No less dubious was a report in the Daily News in February 1930, based on an American newspaper story. According to Colonel Friedrich Herzenwirth, said to be a former member of the German intelligence service:

The Angel of Mons were motion pictures thrown upon ‘screens’ of foggy white cloudbanks by cinematographic projecting machines mounted in German aeroplanes which hovered above the British lines . . . The object of the Germans responsible for these scientific ‘visions’ was to create superstitious terror in the Allied ranks. 

According to Herzenwirth, the plan backfired, and was successfully exploited by the British for their own benefit. However, the very next day the Daily News published a corrective report, explaining that its Berlin correspondent had been informed by official German sources that there was no record of the mysterious colonel, whose story was now dismissed as a hoax. Curiously, the projection idea would be resurrected by the British propaganda agencies in March 1940, who in the midst of the static Phoney War, gave consideration to ‘a suggestion for an apparatus to project images on clouds’ over the German lines by means of an unspecified ‘magic lantern’ apparatus.

I like the idea of the Angel of Mons as a kind of bat-signal.

The idea was not pursued. However, further evidence of the remarkable staying power of this particular myth came in March 2001, when it was announced that actor Marlon Brando had paid £350,000 for spectral footage of angels shot by William Doidge at Woodchester Park in the Cotswolds during the Second World War.

This isn’t explained very well, but it seems Brando wanted to buy the footage to use in a film which was seemingly planned to dramatise the origins story of this material, with Brando playing an American

Doidge, a veteran of the BEF and the retreat from Mons, was said to have been obsessed with the angels legend of 1914, believing they could lead him to his Belgian sweetheart, with whom he had lost contact during the war. Like Machen’s original story published by the Evening News, the film promised excellent entertainment, although as factual history the verdict is likely to be less kind.

The verdict appeared a year after this story hit the Sunday Times, with Danny Sullivan, who had acquired the “angel footage” (only one photograph seems to exist) admitting the whole thing was a hoax, a publicity stunt to promote tourism at Woodchester Park. Along with Brando, the film project also involved director Tony Kaye, of AMERICAN HISTORY X and craziness fame, who was quoted as saying “I want to include Doidge’s footage of the apparition at the heart of the movie. It will be a spine-tingling moment. This is the closest we have on film to proof of an angel. I’ve spent much of my life looking at special visual effects, and this is an effect for which I have no explanation.”

Hey, Tony! I think I have an explanation!