Archive for EA Dupont

The Little Woman

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2019 by dcairns

The Doll family, according to the IMDb, made very few film appearances. The best known of the foursome are better known by different stage names — Harry Earles (originally Kurt Schneider) and sister Daisy (Hilda Schneider) appear in Tod Browning’s FREAKS in central roles, and in small parts (sorry!) in THE WIZARD OF OZ and THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH. But Fiona thinks she may have spotted Daisy elsewhere.

An older Daisy — we think — flirts with Cliff Robertson in THE BIG SHOW (1961), a stultifying 20th Century Fox circus pic that just about did for Esther Williams’ career. The distinctive helium-squeak voice and German accent (the film was shot on locations around Munich) convince us that this must be Daisie or one of her siblings. She gives a more relaxed performance here than in FREAKS, and is the high point of the film if it’s really her. If it’s not really her, there is no reason to watch this movie. Really terrible.

And in E.A. Dupont’s MOULIN ROUGE (1928), which we just enjoyed at HippFest (well, Fiona fell asleep, but she couldn’t help herself and she consumed the film eagerly on video later), a troupe of little people are seen performing at the Casino de Paris, and again the female lead in the act looks like Daisy. And in yellowface, yet. Which part of this act is most offensive? Oh, and the fiendish Mandarin seems like a dead ringer for Harry.

The show documented in MOULIN ROUGE evidently featured a whole array of little people, so it makes sense that they’d hire the Doll family in order to bulk up the numbers. It’s a veritable Parisian Munchkinland.

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Happy mistakes

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2017 by dcairns

A mismanaged day. but it resulted in some good things ~

The morning was easy — to Cinema Jolly for Dave Kehr’s retrospectives on Universal, the Laemmle years, and William K. Howard. LADIES MUST LOVE, an uncharacteristically zippy E.A. Dupont pre-code and the Sturges-scripted THE POWER AND THE GLORY. More on those another time.

In the afternoon I couldn’t make up my mind. I’d seen the silent THE INFORMER in Bo’ness. I opted for WRITTEN ON THE WIND — a Technicolor print from the camera negative, as it turned out. Scratchy in places, but breathtaking.

I had totally planned to see WISE BLOOD, introduced by producer Michael Fitzgerald and Queen of Continuity Angela Allen, but found myself switching to Iranian melodrama ZARBAT instead. It wasn’t as crazy as billed, so I bailed on it, only to learn that I left just as it was about to go nuts.

That brought me out into a thunderstorm so I sought shelter at Rupert Julian’s THE SAVAGE, which had Colleen Moore but was still a Rupert Julian film from 1917, and incomplete to boot. But where else am I going to see that? And then a Gregory La Cava cartoon, and then I skipped out during a documentary figuring to return for Mae West in SHE DONE HIM WRONG, only to find a massive queue for that and a further thunderstorm.

Enjoyed a big chat with David Bordwell and Dave Kehr and Jonathan Rosenbaum though, so that was fine. Had massive dinner. Assumed the open-air screening of King Vidor’s THE PATSY was off, so set my heart on ERASERHEAD. In fact, the rain had stopped, the forecasts were clear and THE PATSY went ahead.

ERASERHEAD was great, though. Spotted a picture of a mushroom cloud on Henry’s wall.

The Sunday Intertitle: The Mystery of Mister Mistol

Posted in FILM with tags , on January 15, 2017 by dcairns

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DAS GEHEIMNIS DES AMERIKA-DOCKS (1919) is an early effort by E.A. Dupont, and it’s uncharacteristically… sprightly? A rather testy master detective is called in when Mr. Mistol is unexpectedly defenestrated from his chemical plant. Zestful, if somewhat grotesque and overbearing performances from the cast, in what is basically a Weimar whodunnit

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The surviving print has Dutch intertitles, and many the characters seem to have Dutch names, robbing the thing of a certain Amerikan atmosphere. Also, is it really wise to print CINEMA PALACE on every intertitle? Doesn’t that tend to take people out of the film? Ah well, maybe it’s Brechtian.

The film has little or nothing to do with Amerika, or docks.

The best touches are little humanizing moments of comedy: as he and his associates are about to hide to await the killer, the detective advises anyone who needs to sneeze to get it over with now.

Actually, I don’t know if Mistol is a Dutch name, nor Hatt, or if they’re the Germans’ idea of Amerikan names. Can’t ask anyone from the picture, that’s for sure.