Archive for Warner Bros

The Sunday Intertitle: OK Boomers

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2021 by dcairns

Very weird double bill for our Saturday watch party — THE GOOSE WOMAN (Clarence Brown) and THE OKLAHOMA KID (Lloyd Bacon). Nothing really in common. The above was suggested as a very suitable Sunday intertitle, you can probably guess which film it’s from. Louise Dresser is speaking to Jack Pickford, America’s first rodent film star.

But OKLAHOMA KID is ram-packed with intertitles too, oddly since it’s a 1939 production. Felt good to be watching a Bacon film, since he keeps popping up in the Essanay Chaplins.

This one is famed for the surprise casting of Cagney and Bogart in a western. Shame it doesn’t have Allen Jenkins or Frank McHugh too. They basically play it like a gangster film, but since this is post-code it doesn’t have the bite and amorality: Jimmy enacts a William Hart “good bad man” arc, redemptive in nature.

The politics follow a slightly different arc: they at first seem very conventional — we’re shown Grover Cleveland (!) agreeing to (forcibly) buy Indian land he’d previously promised they could keep, but the movie seems to soft-pedal the injustice — no suggestion that the price isn’t going to be fair. But then…

CAGNEY: In the first place, the white people steal the land from the Indians, right?

CRISP: They get paid for it, don’t they?

CAGNEY: Pay for it? Yeah. A measly dollar and forty cents an acre, price agreed to at the point of a gun. Then the immigrants sweat and strain and break their hearts carving out a civilisation. Fine, great! And when they get all pretty and prosperous along come the grafters and land-grabbers and politicians, and with one hand skim off the cream and the other scoop up the gravy. Not for me. Listen, I learned this about human nature when I was but so high, and that is: that the strong take away from the weak, and the smart take it away from the strong.”

A primer in capitalism and empire-building, Warners style. Of course, Warners rarely follow through on their more radical impulses, but the movie does feature an attack on mob violence, before celebrating vigilantism of a more individualistic sort — Cagney announces he’s hauled in a wanted man. “Dead or alive?” he’s asked. “A little of each.”

And then Cagney is subsumed into civilisation and forcibly wed to Rosemary Lane (he has more luck with her than sister Priscilla). Is the film backing away from its earlier stance, or just admitting what happens to outlaws? Cagney himself went from leftist to self-described arch-conservative, so while it’s a disappointing ending it’s not necessarily dishonest, and the filmmakers probably hoped the ideas planted earlier might still germinate in moviegoers’ minds.

I Covet the Waterfront

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2020 by dcairns

Here’s a minor but highly enjoyable Litvak WB drama with a comic tone — a companion in some ways to THE AMAZING DR. CLITTERHOUSE. As with that charming oddity, there’s a serious villain and a comic hero, or in this case, heroes.

Or is that strictly correct? The pic’s leading man is John Garfield, who gets the screen time commensurate with this status, and what I suppose we must call the romance, with Ida Lupini. Garfield plays a nasty character, not only a racketeer but a sadist, albeit one with dangerous charisma and a slick line of chat.

The film’s clitterhousing is divided by part-time fishermen Thomas Mitchell and John Qualen (in maybe the closest he got to co-lead). Garfield’s protection racket puts the squeeze on them, the law proves ineffectual (the script’s least convincing moment, and surely it could have been made credible) and they are driven to contemplate… murder.

The trouble is, unlike Clitterhouse, who was what I’m going to term genre-fluid, able to become a melodramatic psycho when the plot demanded it, then shift back to absurdity, these guys exist in only a few closely-aligned modes — sympathetic, pathetic, and comic. Can comic characters kill a serious one, and get away with it under the Production Code? As with CLITTERHOUSE, the answer is surprising.

Maybe the balance isn’t as neat as in DR. C., and maybe that’s because Garfield has to be given a substantial enough role to justify his presence, or maybe he’s not given enough genuine appeal to make his wooing of Lupino compelling (she loses sympathy for taking any interest in him, over poor Eddie Albert’s honest schnook). But still, it generates a ton of suspense and gets itself out of narrative trouble with surprising wrinkles. Fun.

Plenty of the the eponymous fog fog fog, and WB atmosphere. The impressive dock set seems to be decorated with one of Errol Flynn’s cast-off galleons.

OUT OF THE FOG stars Porfirio Diaz; Elvira Bonner; Uncle Billy; Irving Radovich; Nicholas Pappalas; Miser Stevens; Kate Canaday; Miles Archer; Delphine Detaille; ‘Slip’ Mahoney; Louie Dumbrowsky; Minor Role (uncredited); Wormy; McNab; Uncle John Joad; Big Bertha; and Hamilton Burger.

The Sunday Intertitle: All this, and Halloween too

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on October 25, 2020 by dcairns

“If l could get at Warner Bros a picture with Bette Davis, whom I considered an excellent actress,·or anybody of this kind, I was happy,
no matter how bad the subject was nor how little time I had to do the picture. The whole conception of picturemaking was not to do something too bad (this, already, made us very happy), for this weekly check we were getting.” ~ Anatole Litvak, Oral History.

The sense that the scenarists of ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO are not quite on top of things is reawakened by the surprise appearance of two seasonal intertitles well into the second act. Given that the story is being narrated by Bette Davis during a French class — those kids are going to be utterly at sea in Le Havre — one wonders, did Bette include the intertitle in her recounting of how her arrival as governess for the children of Charles Boyer and Barbara O’Neil (Scarlett O’Hara’s mum; quite bad in this) caused everyone to die. You definitely get a much better experience with this mostly stodgy, “quality” drama from WB if you imagine that Bette is lying her ass off and she’s totally murdered everyone, including her class. We could come out of flashback to find her surrounded by corpses at schooldesks.

The Halloween sequence abruptly allows Anatole Litvak to conjure some nice spooky atmosphere, then it’s back to the wretched plot. The interesting thing about the true story this derives from is that it helped inspire the 1848 revolution, but we don’t see any of that.

My cunning plan was, or should have been, to make Anatole Litvak Week One take us up to the war, which caused a dramatic shift in Litvak’s whole approach to his work. But I’ve run out of weekdays and I have pieces to write on CASTLE ON THE HUDSON, CITY FOR CONQUEST, OUT OF THE FOG, BLUES IN THE NIGHT and maybe THIS ABOVE ALL (dunno, haven’t watched yet). Three of the above are going to share a single post, though. To hell with THE SISTERS. So what I’ll maybe do is run a couple of pieces next week on their own, just to keep the cauldron simmering, and jump back into Week Two, as planned, in November.

Still, ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO stars Margo Channing; Adam Belinsky; Lloyd Hart; Ellen – his wife; Dinah Lord; Parthy Ann Hawks; Oliver Larrabee; Garbitsch; Colonel Skeffington; Walter Parks Thatcher; Lord Marshmorton; Mrs. Pike; Maureen Robinson; Randy Monaghan – as a Girl; Lars-Erik; Franz Liszt; Rameses I; Pa Dillinger (uncredited); Mrs. Stark – Jim’s grandmother; James Kirkham; and undetermined secondary role.