Archive for the Politics Category

Special

Posted in FILM, Politics, Television with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2015 by dcairns

oscar

Managed to largely ignore the Oscars again this year. My overall take on the awards is that they can pretty much be guaranteed to go to the wrong people for the wrong films. If an award-worthy actor gets a little golden swordsman, it will be for the wrong film, probably in the wrong year. I have to be careful here because I have a great good friend who has three of the metallic minions, and he totally earned them. Maybe I can make my rule work by saying he should have won his 2001 award in 2003, his 2002 award in 2001, and his 2003 award in 2002. Yeah, that makes sense. Good.

I have a sort of perverse respect for the tradition of the Honorary or Special Oscar. Why should the year’s great accomplishments be forced to fit into a set of more or less random categories? Traditionally, these went either to children, black people and the disabled, or, by some special dispensation, to Walt Disney, who got three. Maybe because he made children’s films, and although he was neither black nor disabled, he was a racist, which is a kind of disability which relates to people of colour.

 
Prepare to cringe: at 3:14 Clooney utters the most disappointing words of his life (apart from, I guess, for some, the words “I do”). Disappointing since he’s supposed to be smart.

If you’re an able-bodied actor pretending to be disabled, obviously you can get a normal Oscar. Confusingly, Harold Russell got a Special Oscar AND a Best Supporting Actor Oscar. Although they don’t actually manufacture a special Oscar with hooks for hands, or a child-sized Oscar struggling to see around the bloody great broadsword. So it’s sort-of special, but not THAT special.

Uncle_Remus_Disney_screenshot

Still, though there’s a certain amount of confusion about how Honorary Oscars work (James Baskett got one for playing Uncle Remus, but Hattie McDaniel got a regular award for playing Mammy in GONE WITH THE WIND: she just had to sit at a segregated table away from her colleagues on the production), I think the tradition should be expanded upon. Anything that makes the Academy more ridiculous and self-parodic is to be encouraged, so that the awards can be enjoyed but not taken too seriously.

There should, upon occasion, be an award for Best False Nose, and this should be presented not to the actor or to the makeup artist but to the actual nose. The acceptance speech would be gratifyingly short. To avoid any sensation of anti-climax maybe Rick Baker could rig up some kind of air pump so the nose could sneeze its gratitude.

There should be an award for Best Dead Person Left Out of the Obituary Montage. This might have to be annual and there might have to be multiple winners.

Rather than giving honorary gongs to people who have never won fair and square and who are now approaching death, they should randomly pick a young up-and-comer each year and give it to them, on the understanding that the Academy can henceforth ignore this person’s work without feeling guilty about it. A sort of pre-emptive Lifetime Achievement Award. If we’d given that to Michael Keaton for NIGHT SHIFT, imagine how much better we’d be feeling now. Or MR. MOM, or JOHNNY DANGEROUSLY!

Look at how well it’s worked for Roberto Benigni.

The honest thing to do, now that we recognize that going “Awww” in the form of an Oscar isn’t an appropriate response to children, ethnic minorities and the disabled (although, given the Academy’s reluctance to hand out awards to any of those groups, why not give ‘em a chance at a patronizing consolation prize at least?), might be to give Special Oscars to people who have been humiliatingly dumped by their celebrity partners. Jennifer Aniston is overdue for this. The poor woman STILL seems to evoke sad-face sympathy reactions ten years post-Brad, despite her wealth and success and constant visibility. It’s as if she had invisible hooks for hands. She deserves a medal — or an Oscar. Hmm, who could present it, to drive the point home?

There could be award for people who have contributed greatly to the cinematic culture by stopping making films. If he just took a short sabbatical, Michael Bay could qualify, and let’s face it, what other chance does he have?

xmunchkin

Imagine this guy in gold!

No person of diminutive stature has ever won the Oscar for anything — clearly an insulting mini-Oscar should be gilded in preparation for the moment when Time has whittled the surviving Munchkins down to one. Treat it as a tontine — the Oscar goes to Last Dwarf Standing. The Academy — nay, the industry as a whole — has a proud history of insensitivity and bogus good intentions — there’s so much to live up to.

Your suggestions are welcome.

The St Valentine’s Day Intertitle #2

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , on February 15, 2015 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h31m20s38

Great pleasure in Portobello — Buster Keaton’s ONE WEEK and SEVEN CHANCES on the big screen (albeit via DVD) with live accompaniment by composer Jane Gardner on piano with Hazel Morrison on percussion. A nicely chosen Valentine’s Day double feature, with the short film playing out over the course of a week which, just like this one, includes a Friday the 13th, Saturday 14th, Sunday 15th…

Once again it was great to see so many kids in attendance — the front row was crammed with them, and they were in hysterics. One quacking cackle in particular was a joy to listen to. And at a key bit in SEVEN CHANCES, when it seems Buster is too late to win the day, a cry of “Awww!”

Over a drink afterwards, Hippodrome producer Shona Thomson, Jane, Fiona and I and some friends had a wide-ranging discussion which included our thought on the various troubling race gags in SEVEN CHANCES. Buster is so apolitical, basically accepting the world as it is, that it seems useless to get in a fuss about his more politically incorrect gags, which usually touch upon something unfortunately true (such as the female victim of domestic violence in OUR HOSPITALITY who turns on Buster when he tries to help her). While Chaplin had the sensitivity to see that minstrel-show humour was unacceptable, his response was to basically exclude black characters from his films altogether, which is far from a solution. Harold Lloyd has the occasional bit of the comedy manservant terrified of “spooks.” But Keaton made a Civil War film from the Southern perspective (ironically because, in a rare moment of political sensitivity, he felt you couldn’t cast the losers as antagonists); he blacks up in COLLEGE, and in SEVEN CHANCES …

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h34m35s164

Firstly, there’s Jules Cowles in blackface as the hired hand. No excuse for this is really possible. There are actual black people in the film, but for the one major-ish role, a white actor is cast. It could be argued that the gags about this character being dull-witted are the same kind of jokes Keaton would make about his own characters in his short films, but it’s all very unfortunate.

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h33m36s88

There’s a startling moment when Buster, puzzled by his inability to get any girl to agree to marry him, takes a look at his reflection to see what can be the matter with him. The mirror he chooses is set in a door, and as he checks his jacket front, the door opens, so that when Buster looks up, he sees a (very handsome) black man in place of his own reflection. He’s startled, as anyone might be (save the black man himself). This isn’t particularly offensive, I don’t think, though it may point towards a kind of racial panic more obvious elsewhere.

Buster proposes to every girl he meets, and there are a whole series of inappropriate/inadmissible woman jokes. There’s one who turns out to have a wedding band, one with a baby, one reading a Jewish newspaper who apparently doesn’t speak English (one hopes that’s the reason she’s ruled out), a drag artist, and one who turns out to be a schoolchild. No particular notice is taken of the lady in mannish attire panned past in THIS shot —

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h32m40s12

And then there’s the black woman, whom Buster approaches from behind before reeling away in horror. Now, until 1948, if I have this right, a white man like Keaton would not have been able to marry a black woman in California, so the joke is merely taking notice of an existing fact, I guess. It’s just that the fact in question makes most modern audiences feel sad, and not able to laugh.

And then there’s the other black woman. When an advertisement for a bride brings rather too many hopefuls to the altar, among them is a middle-aged black lady (most of the unwanted aspirants are on the mature side) who either doesn’t know the anti-miscegenation laws or just isn’t going to let them stand between her and seven million dollars. It was Hazel the drummer who spotted the fact that another bride-to-bee is already sporting a prominent wedding ring, so evidently Keaton’s pursuers are desperate enough to throw off all society’s restrictions.

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h35m10s254x

Keaton is quite rightly beloved, and we generally agree to overlook his occasional lapses. At this historic distance, his willingness to make fun of terrorist bombings (in COPS) and hurricanes (in STEAMBOAT BILL JNR) seem kind of admirable. With the race gags, I kind of like the way we don’t get hysterical in either sense of the word. They just create slightly awkward gaps in the laughter before we can move on to the next bit of comic genius.

vlcsnap-2015-02-15-00h38m28s221

“AWWW!”

Juke Swamp

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , on January 31, 2015 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2015-01-16-10h41m45s185

JUKE GIRL is a pretty good Warner melo from the pen of A.I. Bezzerides — like all his films it manages a prominent role for a Greek-American character, and carries a bit of a political punch. Odd to see such a left-leaning film, siding with farmers against crooked wholesalers, yet starring Ronald Reagan. He’s actually kind of winning in it.

The title character is lovely Ann Sheridan, who dances with customers in Muckeye’s bar. The movie is in no way hers. The plan must have been to imply that it’s the story of a racy dance hall hostess to cover the fact that the movie is really about organized labour. It would have been great if Reagan had gotten in trouble with HUAC for being in it, but alas even their idiocy had limits.

vlcsnap-2015-01-16-10h40m30s180

My favourite line is Ann seducing her way onto the premises of the wholesalers’ so Ron can steal a truck to help out the embattled Greek farmer who must get his produce to market before it spoils. “Gee, a packing house must be a wonderful place at night,” she coos through the fence.

With almost precode energy, the movie does a lot of packing itself, cramming in a murder and framing along with the dirty business dealings and hints of political corruption. It’s oppressively crammed with ugly mugs, bulbous, walking Drew Friedman cartoons — if you have Richard Whorf AND Howard Da Silva in a movie, you are possibly subjecting your audience’s nerves to what the automobile industry calls destructive testing. How much nasal sneering can we take?

Curtis Bernhardt directs, without his interesting expressionistic flourishes, but with a lot of GUSTO.

At the end, the murderer is revealed as wholesaler Gene Lockhart, so Ron and Ann are saved from the lynch mob. We think that’s going to be the situation defused, since Lockhart, an unintentional killer, is clearly in the throes of complete nervous collapse and can be turned over to the sheriff, but NO — the ugly (ugly!) mob he has whipped up now turns on him, and Bernhardt, who can’t help himself, chucks in one METROPOLIS style high angle of hands reaching for the miscreant, ringing around him, seemingly about to tear him apart like Charles Laughton’s Dr. Moreau…

vlcsnap-2015-01-16-10h41m33s40

And we fade out. A coda rounds off the fate of the other characters, but this moment of bloody, Reign of Terror revolution is never referred to again, and we are left to assume that Lockhart was (a) torn limb from limb (b) hanged from a lamppost or (c) eaten.

This is why Warner pictures are the coolest.

The title attracted me in the same way that SO YOUNG SO BAD and PROBLEM GIRLS seem like really appealing movies based on titles alone. Watch for them here soon!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 514 other followers