Archive for Wendy Toye

The Sunday Intertitle: George K. American

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2019 by dcairns

THE BOOB (1926) is a slice of Americana — a product only available in slices, it seems. You never see a whole, unsliced one, even in the work of Norman Rockwell.

We open on a swing, where a city slicker seduces a simple she-bumpkin. Director William Wellman fixes his camera to the swing, so he can frame the couple rock-steady while the bucolic scene behind them lurches seasickeningly up and down. Grand!

George K. Arthur had the damnedest career. I can’t make him out. He first appeared on my radar as star and putative backer of Josef Von Sternberg’s debut film, THE SALVATION HUNTERS. He offered JVS a budget of $$60,000 to make a film that would give him a starring role. Then, according to the director (and I’ve been unable to ascertain how honest the memoir Fun In a Chinese Laundry is, but I’ve pinpointed no definite lies), filming was begun using available locations and cheap talent, and GKA tearfully confessed that the 60K didn’t exist. Jo ploughed on regardless with his own savings, and the film made a name for him. (JVS had an indomitable, triumph-over-adversity side as well as a knack for making everyone hate him: part Horatio Alger, part Alger Hiss.)

It no doubt boosted George’s profile too, though he’d already played some big parts, going by the IMDb (he OUGHT to have had $60,000).

In THE BOOB, Englishman George (the son of a traveling salesman and a department store product demonstrator, so he may have had the right nature and nurture to pull the con on JVS) plays an American yokel, with much pasty-faced gurning. I’m reminded unpleasantly of El Brendel, though here the grimace supplants the smirk.

For the next ten years or so, GKA alternated between biggish supporting roles and uncredited bit parts. He departs Hollywood, or at least his credits die out, in 1935.

But GKA will resurface, in his native England, as producer for Wendy Toye’s excellent short films THE STRANGER LEFT NO CARD (1952) and ON THE TWELFTH DAY (1955), and also, uncredited, in the same capacity on Jack Clayton’s THE BESPOKE OVERCOAT (1955), thus kickstarting two more major cinematic careers, whatever his role in Von Sternberg’s origin story.

So I salute you, George K. Arthur! And your little dog, too.

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The Sunday Intertitle: Tillie Eulenspiegel

Posted in Comics, FILM with tags , , , , , , on December 13, 2015 by dcairns

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Then Marion Davies is not the girl for you, sir.

TILLIE THE TOILERS is based on a newspaper strip cartoon, but it’s a Marion Davies production and apart from going brunette to match the drawn character she’s up to her usual light comedy tricks. At no point is she required to change costume in a phone booth, as diverting as that would be, or scale a tall building with anything more strenuous than a single elevator.

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The titular Tillie is a secretary on the make, rather callously ditching her beau so as to pursue first the foppish assistant manager, Mr Whipple (George K. Arthur), from whome she extracts lunch, and then a passing millionaire, Mr. Penny Fish, for whom she ditches Whipple with haste and not a little relief. It’s to the credit of the screenwriters and Davies that Tillie remains somewhat sympathetic throughout.

We’re at MGM’s Number One plot here, recycled through several Joan Crawford vehicles a couple of years later — how to marry well while remaining virtuous. It’s OK to be a little mercenary as long as you stay virginal.

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George K. Arthur is an interesting figure — he backed Von Sternberg’s first film, THE SALVATION HUNTERS, on the proviso that he play lead, which he wasn’t very suited to doing. He’s much better as a supercilious schnook here. Sternberg claimed that the budget Arthur promised turned out not to exist, and so Sternberg ended up paying for the film himself.

Returning to his native Britain, Arthur, produced the early shorts of Jack Clayton and Wendy Toye, for which cinephiles should thank him. I’m presuming in those cases the money actually existed. Mr Whipple came a long way.

A softly falling silent shroud of snow

Posted in FILM, literature, MUSIC, Television with tags , , , , , , , on October 31, 2015 by dcairns

This is really wonderful. I didn’t know the classic story it’s based on, by Conrad Aiken, but it’s beautiful and very very strange. This semi-professional filming (the IMDb doesn’t know of its existence) manages a kind of expressive naivety in its effects which works well. The same filmmaker, Gene Kearney, later filmed the story again for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, with Orson Welles as narrator. I must see that, though I sort of doubt it will be as good in colour, with an NBC TV look to it. The narrator on this version does great. But I must admit I’m psyched to hear Welles do it. Where did I put my set of Night Gallery season 2?

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Found it! Wonderful to hear Welles at work on this text, and the episode justifies the whole existence of Night Gallery (which, let’s face it, was frequently crummy) — it’s the kind of material one simply can’t imagine seeing on television. Having said that, feeding it through the NBC de-flavouring machine does result in a loss of visual atmosphere. In the b&w version you COULD close your eyes and still enjoy it, but you really WANT to watch.

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I’m reminded of the fact that the great Wendy Toye remade her own masterpiece, THE STRANGER LEFT NO CARD, as an episode of Tales of the Unexpected. I’m very curious to see it, but despite a TOTU box set and constant TV replaying, that one never seems to turn up…

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Note: the ending of Youtube’s SSSS seems abrupt, and comes before the last couple of lines of the short story. Truncation was suspected — but Night Gallery trims the show at exactly the same line, so I guess that’s Keirney’s decision, and all that can be missing is some kind of end title.