Archive for The Untouchables

The Chicago Way

Posted in FILM, MUSIC, Politics, Television with tags , , , , , , on February 14, 2019 by dcairns

SCARFACE stars Louis Pasteur; Molly Louvain; Pendola Molloy; the Duc de Richlieu; Surat Khan; Spats Colombo; Fishbone; Hjalmar Poelzig; Count Mancini; Freedonia’s Secretary of War #1; with Kitty Packard, Montague L. ‘Monty’ Brewster, and Sandoni.

THE ST. VALENTINE’S DAY MASSACRE stars Cable Hogue; Quiller; Mike Hammer; Freeman Lowell; Dr. Eldon Tyrrel; 2nd Lt. Michael Shannon O’Rourke; Armand Duvalle; Seymour Krelborn; Walter Paisley; Jake Gittes; Sweet Sue; and the voice of Colossus.

THE UNTOUCHABLES stars Wyatt Earp; Sam ‘Ace’ Rothstein; Robert ‘Duke’ Anderson; Farley Mowat; Terry Benedict; Ava Paige; and Sheriff J.W. Pepper.

The St. Valentine’s Day Podcast:

 

The Shadowcast: Scarfaces

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on February 13, 2019 by dcairns

Fiona and I look at cinematic manifestations of Al Capone. Because episode seven was recorded before episode six, it will sound like our colds are getting worse, whereas in fact they’re all gone.

The key texts are the Hawks SCARFACE, THE ST VALENTINE’S MASSACRE, and THE UNTOUCHABLES, but we try to touch on every major movie Capone. Hope we didn’t miss YOUR favourite!

Wanted to put this one out there in time for Valentine’s day.

Grease Monkey Business

Posted in FILM, literature with tags , , , , , , , , on July 19, 2012 by dcairns

The Coen Brothers, back when BLOOD Simple was new, were asked about modern noir and in particular the new version of THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE with Jessica Lange and Jack Nicholson. Not yet having learned the form of good manners that seems to prevail in the film industry, whereby filmmakers rarely badmouth each others’ work (in this, as much else, Ken Russell was un vrai enfant terrible), they remarked that Pauline Kael’s criticism of the film seemed to them dead right.

Kael had basically said that the scene in James M. Cain’s book when a man is murdered just as he sings out into a valley, and his voice echoes back after his death to alarm his murderer, was pure cinema, and that nobody with an ounce of cinematic sense could possibly omit it from a movie adaptation. Now, Bob Rafelson, that film’s director, showed considerable cinematic sense, or at least flair, in his work —

But he must bear some responsibility for leaving out that compelling detail, and for truncating the book’s grimly ironic ending. (Though in fairness, his film delivers on some other key moments.) But if we have to point the finger of blame, I’d sooner point it at David Mamet, who does seem to me to display an anti-cinematic impulse in nearly everything he touches. An exception can be made for THE UNTOUCHABLES, where Mamet’s speechifying and DePalma’s showy excess hold each other in a kind of goofy equilibrium.

Anyhow, both Cain’s murder scene and his ending are intact in the FIRST version of Postman, which might not be the version you’re thinking of. Check it out at The Forgotten.