Archive for The Three Stooges

Stooge Struck

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on May 16, 2019 by dcairns
Stooge Kit

Bought a Three Stooges box set secondhand. Well, it was there and so was I. Do I LIKE the Three Stooges? I never thought I did, but I was curious — it’s been decades since I saw a whole one, if I ever did. My memory of TV screenings includes no specific details whatever, just a general impression of the films being in bad shape — and I was used to Laurel & Hardy, so they must have looked really wretched.

It’s basically like a more violent FUNNY GAMES, this one.

Well, now they’re all cleaned up, looking actually new, which doesn’t help, and they don’t seem to feel like the product of any particular era. I watched one where they try to crash Hollywood, and one where they play exterminators (possibly an influence on fanboy Sam Raimi’s CRIME WAVE) who start by planting infestations on (former silent star) Clara Kimball Young’s house party to drum up business, then go fox-hunting for no reason. Then it just kind of stops.

Well, anything you say about the Stooges is probably irrelevant to anyone who finds them really funny. There were some laughs, especially in the extermination skit. Let’s face it, Laurel & Hardy rarely managed a strong fade-out — they’re more usually shrugs. And L&H could be brutal, but with the boys, a poke in the eye was a bit like sand in the vaseline. With the Stooges, the proportions are reversed: a whole sandpit with a blob of lube dropped in.

Mo actually threatens one of his co-stooges thus: “I’ll gouge your eyes out.” About which I see nothing particularly humorous.

Cruelty to animals, too — well, the producer brought us the DOGVILLE SHORTS…

In addition to the violence, there’s the fact that the stooges gits are deliberately spreading misery (and mice, moths, bed bugs…). Well, the Marx Bros. were generally up to no good. (When they try to play Cupid or help struggling sanatoria, we disapprove.) But that was generally part of their anarchy, their conviction that civilisation is overrated. The Stooges are trying to get along and fit it. They’re conservatives. Just vicious, incompetent ones. With really bizarre hair.

Hmm, maybe these films are timely?

Clearly, I need to see more.

Advertisements

A Gentlemaniac

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on April 1, 2017 by dcairns

MAD HOLIDAY (1936) is a quite pleasant THIN MAN knock-off (one of MANY) with wisecracking Edmund Lowe (a stoutish cover with a Grouchoesque delivery) and elegant, playful Elissa Landi sharing rather good chemistry. Also, the premise is very nice — Lowe plays a Hollywood star who’s sick of playing a sleuth in a popular movie series and runs off on an ocean cruise so he can “walk into a room without barking my shins on a corpse.” Landi is a glamorous lady who turns out to be the pseudonymous author of the books he’s been starring in adaptations of. If you’ll allow me a sentence ending in a preposition (I’ve checked, there isn’t actually a rule against it, but it does sometimes look funny.)

Also appearing is Edgar Kennedy as the baffled and irritated policeman, because it can’t ALWAYS be Sam Levene or Jame Gleason, you know. Plus Zasu Pitts, Edmund Gwenn, Gustaf Von Seyffertitz…

And also also starring is Ted Healy, the man who originally convened the Three Stooges, before perishing after a series of barroom brawls staged over a single night with such participants as Cubby Broccoli and Wallace Beery. Healy is accompanied by an unfamiliar stooge in this one — Healy plays a publicity man and Richard Hakins plays his photographer, and they engage in a lot of Stooges-type knockabout roughhouse stuff, Healy continually slapping Hakins’ forehead etc.

Who is this Hakins? He has the role of a Stooge but isn’t Moe, Larry, Curly, or one of their relatives. It turns out he’s a member of the Gentlemaniacs, a group Healy formed after the original trio left his act because he was a souse. He developed his new team, then summarily dismissed them after the Stooges expressed a willingness to return to the fold. The Gentlemaniacs trundled along without him for a while, developing trick musical instruments that could be used as weapons, to distinguish themselves from their rivals, and briefly engaging in a lawsuit with the Howard/Fine combo over who originated the name “Three Stooges.” The guys we remember as the Three Stooges won that one by producing a legal document establishing their use of the name. What a wondrous document that must be.

The Stooges really look as if there’s something wrong with them. Other comedians were funny-looking in ways they could drop when off-stage or off-screen. It must have been a joy for Groucho to wipe his moustache off and go unrecognized. But Moe must have had that bowl-cut all the time, unless it was a wig. And Hakins has an equally unfortunate barnett, a sweeping nest of hair coiled around a head that suggests arcane African skull-binding practices. He’s a bit like Robert Woolsey, who always looked like he’d suffered some debilitating childhood illness (he hasn’t).

Still, I developed some appreciation for Healy and Dakins. Healy is a loud, surly type, but he has a unique walk, a strangely fey stagger, combining a feeling of ungainly drunkenness with an odd, pansified daintiness, surprising in such a big, paunchy and loud man. He’s only occasionally funny, and almost always tiresome, but students of performance may get something from looking at him.

Nautical But Nice

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2013 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2013-06-07-08h47m16s136

THE CAPTAIN HATES THE SEA is a kind of Grand Hotel of the ocean waves. I was curious about it because Lewis Milestone’s early thirties work is so dynamic and experimental — RAIN, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT and THE FRONT PAGE together give the lie to the popular idea that cinema got staid when sound came in. It undoubtedly did for some filmmakers, but Milestone seems to have been liberated by it. The challenge of moving the camera despite the demands of the microphone energized him, and a filmmaker who seems to have been fairly conventional (THE RACKET, TWO ARABIAN KNIGHTS) during the late silent era suddenly turned into a kind of crackly Scorsese. Or am I wrong?

Like Mamoulian, however, Milestone was quick to settle down into a more conventional approach — the explosive moments in his later films are commonly repeats of the highlights of ALL QUIET — all his subsequent war movies re-use the fast tracking shots along the trenches, for instance. But as late as OCEAN’S 11 he could still purvey moments of visual beauty — that film’s final shot is a breathtaking evocation of rat pack cool, making up for the not very inspiring 126 minutes preceding it. At any rate THE CAPTAIN is very elegantly shot, smoothly combining its location and studio material, but it isn’t a dazzling tour de force like RAIN. Nor does it aspire to be.

The titular captain is Walter Connolly in his best dyspeptic mode — he ran away to sea after dunking his dad’s beard in the soup. Now he’s tormented by his troublesome passengers, his inebriate chief steward (Leon Errol) and Donald Meek, whose long beard and careless posture over his broth presents a perennial temptation to repeat the sins of his youth.

vlcsnap-2013-06-07-08h51m46s25

Also aboard is an all-star cast with John Gilbert at the top and the Three Stooges at the bottom. What Milestone has set out to do here, which was probably just as hard as inventing expressive sound cinema, is integrate the acting styles of Gilbert, Connolly, Victor McLaglan, Akim Tamiroff, Luis Alberni and the Stooges. He does it!

McLaglan is particularly impressive — not stifled, but holding back in key moments to create striking muted effects. He still does his patented Victor McLaglan face at times (co-star Helen Vinson matches it by putting the edges of he sharp little teeth together in a feral grin, lips sucked back — the pair of them look set to go for each other’s throats) but he avoids the mawkish grotesquerie that was so often his stock-in-trade.

vlcsnap-2013-06-07-08h47m49s196

Gilbert’s performance should be studied by anyone tempted to believe he actually had anything wrong with his voice. Not only that, he should be studied by students of effective screen acting. In silents he was often callow. In QUEEN CHRISTINA he seems a touch hysterical. Here he’s solid, wryly humorous and he rivets the attention. His character is a washed-up alcoholic writer, supposedly taking a cruise to dry out. While discussing his new state of sobriety, he carries on soaking up the straight scotch (“Never bruise liquor!”) as before, a study in better living through denial. Since Gilbert had booze troubles of his own, the comedy (it’s all played for laughs) comes across more poignant than funny, but Gilbert seems to be aiming in that direction. There’s a melancholy to him that was probably inherent by this point in his life and career.