Archive for The Ladykillers

Swiss Cheese

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on January 3, 2015 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2015-01-03-16h33m11s22

Actors: when your director asks you to do this, refuse politely.

DUSTY ERMINE — why IS it called that? — is an early thirties Hitchcockian light thriller helmed not by Hitch but by the considerably less-renowned Bernard “Mad” Vorhaus, celebrated for THE LAST JOURNEY in Britain and later THE MYSTERIOUS MR X in America. Helped by considerable, impressive and frequently dangerous-looking location work in the Swiss Alps, he makes a fun show out of a slightly rambling yarn about forged banknotes, a lovable ex-con uncle, and strong-willed filly and an equally pigheaded but rather incompetent Scotland Yard detective. I’d rate it as highly as a minor Hitchcock thriller of the same period, say THE SECRET AGENT (also Swiss-set in part).

vlcsnap-2015-01-03-16h35m28s98

But what provides most interest is a couple of actors better known for later roles. Katy Johnson, the tiny Mrs. Wilburforce from THE LADYKILLERS, looks much the same but is considerably sturdier. One always knew that Mrs. Lopsided had steel in her hunched old backbone, and she makes quite a formidable matron here, moving about with disconcerting speed and forcefulness.

vlcsnap-2015-01-03-16h38m58s165

The chief villain — well, the shambolic story doesn’t quite have one, but a junior one with quite a bit of screen time is played by Margaret Rutherford, in her first credited role. It’s a surprise to see her as a baddie, so beloved was she in harmless eccentric roles from BLITHE SPIRIT on. Her method of adapting her particular instrument to this challenge is fascinating. Her habit of straightening her back and sinking her head into her “chest” while ringing her hands enthusiastically, can be performed, with only slight change of emphasis, so as to create a peculiarly disagreeable effect, cockroachlike in its repulsiveness. Perhaps what’s most peculiar is the thought that such strange posturings, in other films, are extremely appealing.

Can be bought: Dusty Ermine [DVD]

The Greengrocer’s Apostrophe

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on October 20, 2013 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2013-10-03-20h04m56s128

From Robert Siodmak’s CRISS CROSS. “Employee’s only.” No wonder their armoured car gets robbed, they can’t even use basic English grammar.

Bunch of idiot’s.

Showed this one to students and was struck by how it really wants to be a portrait of a terrible love affair (trust is gone) and has to force itself to be a crime movie. Fortunately, the crime movie it’s forcing itself to be is a damned good one, even if the crime masterminded by dopey hero Burt Lancaster is a magnificently dumb piece of self-destruct planning. I mean, it doesn’t so much carry the seeds of its own destruction as the whole damn tree. Which is itself in bud.

The sub-sub-genre of armoured car robbery movies deserves a pamphlet of its own, from the shambolic overthinking of Lancaster’s scheme and its Soderbergh remake, THE UNDERNEATH, to the factual comedy of THE BRINK’S JOB (note the correct apostrophe) to Richard Fleischer’s self-explanatory ARMORED CAR ROBBERY and climaxing with the Mackendrick-Rose-Ealing-Guinness THE LADYKILLERS.

Philip Kemp’s Mackendrick bio, Lethal Innocence, has a good story about that heist. Mackendrick had a tendency to go all-out for authenticity in small matters, which he later identified as a diversionary measure to take his mind off the more intractable problems of the narrative at hand. Anyhow, in quest of realism he consulted the Metropolitan Police, appraising them of his fictional caper and asking if such a scheme could possibly work.

The detective took a long breath. “I’m very glad you decided to become a filmmaker, Mr Mackendrick. It would work only too well.”

The Best Of Ealing Collection [DVD]
Criss Cross (1949) Region 1,2,3,4,5,6 Compatible DVD. Starring Burt Lancaster and Yvonne De Carlo

Unbandaged

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2012 by dcairns

vlcsnap-2012-12-01-15h18m51s224

The director had hiccups. A really bad case — they lasted days. It was a real problem because he might hiccup at any point, during a take, and ruin the sound. It became a running joke — the production hiccups.

Then one day he didn’t come in to the studio. He was dead. Apparently hiccups can be a sign of an approaching heart attack. Who knew?

With Seth Holt out of the picture, the picture was finished by the talentless Michael Carreras, the man who destroyed Hammer films with his terrible ideas and equally terrible ambitions to write, direct, produce, none of which he had the slightest knowledge of or capacity for. But BLOOD FROM THE MUMMY’S TOMB is still a pretty interesting show.

vlcsnap-2012-12-01-15h16m53s73

It’s got Andrew Keir, the best film Quatermass, and James Villiers, and George “I was in CITIZEN KANE and now this” Coulouris, Aubrey Morris (Yay! P.R. Deltoid!) and Valerie Leon, known in the UK as the Hi Karate Woman. A fine actress with enormous juicy breasts.

The musique concrete is by Tristram Carey, who also scored THE LADYKILLERS, which Holt produced. He’s one of the very few filmmakers who worked at Ealing and Hammer, and he must have liked the dysfunctional family atmosphere — he might have fitted well into the BBC. Holt’s wife said that he and director Sandy Mackendrick should never have worked together, since rather than anchoring one another and compensating for their excesses, they hyped each other into a frenzy and made everything twice as crazy as it needed to be. Which is perhaps why THE LADYKILLERS is such a brilliantly extreme film. (Say, I’m writing a book about it, aren’t I?)

Kenneth Tynan wrote NOWHERE TO GO, consciously intended as the last Ealing picture (perhaps a good film to watch for this Blogathon!), a dark thriller which Holt served up with bracing savagery. TASTE OF FEAR, aka SCREAM OF FEAR, was Hammer’s best DIABOLIQUES knock-off, with the corpse sitting calmly at the bottom of the swimming pool destined to traumatize a young Tom Hanks when his mother, in a confused state, led him into the wrong cinema. Not BAMBI at all.

Holt’s best movie is surely THE NANNY, with a powerful and relatively controlled performance from Bette Davis, great work from the child actors, and a really gripping use of interior space — shot by Harry Waxman, who was always at his best in black and white (cf BRIGHTON ROCK). Davis described Holt as “a mountain of evil” or something, somewhat to the bafflement

vlcsnap-2012-12-01-15h18m56s17

Late Hammer films are typically portraits of the disintegration of a stolid but efficient studio organisation, derailed by monumentally clueless management. TO THE DEVIL A DAUGHTER is actually really good, but the powers that be cut off the whole climax, leaving Christopher Lee and Satan apparently vanquished by a small pebble hurled at the Great Man’s dome by Richard Widmark. This one manages to hold back on the nudity apart from a couple of modest, not-too-distracting instances, and balances creepiness with camp in an unusual way. The asylum scene, with the maniacal flurry of canted angles and ludicrous toy cobra, was actually helmed by Carreras and it may be the only good thing he ever did — I’m inclined to credit Holt’s shooting plan or DoP Arthur Grant, who’d begun in quota quickies with Michael Powell and had worked at Hammer throughout their glory years —

UK: Blood From the Mummy’s Tomb [DVD] [1971]

US: Blood From the Mummy’s Tomb

cropped-7women3-1.jpg

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 614 other followers