Archive for The Chiseler

Under Dog

Posted in FILM, Mythology, Politics with tags , , on May 12, 2015 by dcairns


Over at The Chiseler, I have a new piece about an interesting and peculiar thing, the Disney cartoon PLUTO’S JUDGEMENT DAY. Not the place one would normally look for twisted and incendiary racial politics, but I seem to have found them. Check it!



Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on April 14, 2015 by dcairns

Okay, now this happened.

It suddenly occurred to me that subtitling Leo was the way to go, and wouldn’t be that hard. So that’s what I did. I rewrote it slightly from yesterday’s version for purposes of timing, so there are some new lines in there. Enjoy!


More limericks, like this one on Greenstreet & Lorre

More schinkenworter (ham-words) — in which I attempt to condense movie stars of the early thirties into single compound words. It may make more sense if you just go look at it, care of The Chiseler.


Those Daring Young Loms on the Flying Trapeze

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on April 6, 2015 by dcairns


I started watching the above British thriller, in which Herbert Lom plays identical twin circus acrobats, and then The Chiseler came banging at my door demanding articles, so I wrote something about the first five minutes of it. Here.

Then I turned to THE DARK TOWER, an earlier Lom vehicle, also set in the world of the circus, with Herbert playing a hypnotist — only one of him this time — prefiguring his famous turn as a hypno-shrink in THE SEVENTH VEIL. Both these earlier vehicles are, to a large extent, cheap rubbish, padded out with circus acts and inexpensive bit players. THE DARK TOWER has a young David Farrar, and a thoroughly unlikable shit he plays, too. The interesting thing about this one — where Lom turns up as a tramp, just as he does at the start of DUAL ALIBI — is that nobody’s very appealing. Lom, the hated outsider, is actually more sympathetic than his resentful fellow circus artistes, even when he decides to use his powers of mesmerism to try to kill Farrar. Do it!

After a play by George S. Kaufman & Alexander Woolcott — long, long after, I suspect. Though I would like to be able to credit them with naming a minor character “Dora Shogun.”


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