Archive for Succession

The Dope

Posted in FILM, Politics, Television with tags , , , , , , , on December 22, 2021 by dcairns

Still working our way through season three of Succession, which continues great. Every now and then a sense of burnout looms, what with all the characters being nasty pieces of work/shit, but then it reinvigorates itself miraculously — episode 5 was incredible. And episode 6 implies that the series could eventually get a bit serious. Already it has more actual politics than House of Cards ever did (grading on a curve, I know).

But Dopesick is maybe even better? I know one shouldn’t overvalue the serious and worthy at the expense of the wickedly funny — trust me, I know. But there’s also more good-quality film directing in Dopesick. The first two episodes are helmed by Barry Levinson. The performances are equally strong — Michael Keaton is doing the best work of his career.

There are moments when you think you know what’s coming — one episode has an explosion and a car crash, very traditional surprise elements — but they somehow tricked me into thinking it wasn’t coming, or was coming in a slow, unstartling way, and then they made me jump out of my seat. A scene later where Keaton’s character, a dope-addicted GP, performs a surgery while high had us cringing at high volume.

The use of music in both shows is exemplary. Nicholas Britell’s Succession theme has that rollicking operatic thing, and Dopesick seems to take a leaf from Chernobyl’s songbook — where Hildur Guðnadóttir’s music for the earlier series created the sound of radiation, creeping in everywhere and poisoning the atmosphere, Scotsman Lorne Balfe’s Dopesick music scores addiction, often present in a scene symbolically rather than literally — a boardroom decision that will spread the opioid plague will be accompanied by sounds of dread, disquiet, pulsing away underneath.

Nothing succeeds

Posted in FILM, Television, Theatre with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2021 by dcairns

Finally catching up with Succession which is every bit as good as everyone says. An excellent lesson in how to make a show without sympathetic characters, except damned if I can pin down how they’re doing it. I guess because everyone is focused on achieving things that we can understand, so we can follow the machinations with interest. As Hitchock knew and constantly showed us, watching somebody try to do something is fascinating and involving when we know (a) the goal (b) the stakes and (c) the obstacles. And then it doesn’t necessarily matter if we like them, we at least understand them. The boardroom battle in episode 6 was incredibly tense, even though the character most involved, the one with the clearest goal and the most at stake, is one of the least appealing (great per from Jeremy Strong) though admittedly he does have a rather heartrending central position (needs his father’s respect, will never, not ever, get it).

The only character without a really clear set of wants is, arguably, Brian Cox’s Logan Roy, the show’s Lear, who is basically just futzing around, upsetting people. Maybe he had a sense of direction once in his life, but now it’s just the love of power, making people do things.

Nothing will come of nothing.

The show, at least in these early eps (we’re at S1E06) has an irritating, jerky-zoom style presumably imposed by exec Adam McKay who directed the pilot. It’s a look, I suppose, but not a pleasing one. He tried something similar on THE BIG SHORT. It’s purportedly a cinematic idea, this “look” thing — TV used to all look the same, while movies tried to look distinctive (sort of — there have always been genre norms, and constraints on what was considered “commercial,” though these are fluid over time). I think Hill St. Blues‘ briefings introduced the idea of the unstable camera — use all the reframings! It’ll give it a documentary edge. Except we can tell, I think, when the camera is reframing just to create jitter, as opposed to actually, you know, getting a better framing.

I discussed the Paul Greengrass approach with a producer friend. “He tells the operator to move whenever they feel like it,” I said. He replied, “I think if you asked most operators what they feel like, they would feel like offering up a nice, stable, beautifully-composed shot.”

Through the static, we can still see that Succession is brilliantly written by Jesse Armstrong and team, always brilliantly acted, and often well directed by folks like Adam Arkin and Andrij Parekh. I eagerly await the moment when they realise the crash zooms are stinking the place up and ditch them.

Fashion Beasts

Posted in Fashion, FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 26, 2021 by dcairns

Just back from HOUSE OF GUCCI. Unexpectedly packed, even on a weekday afternoon, which presumably implies it’s a hit. Couldn’t even get two seats together, but after the BBFC certificate appeared there was still one vacant seat next to Fiona so I got into it.

It’s not bad. My trouble was we’ve started watching Succession, finally, and the writing in that is so much better, the Ridley Scott movie pales a bit, even though it’s much better looking. But not THAT good-looking. Very plush, very desaturated and metallic, very dark. But not a lot of exciting filmmaking on display. It moves quite slowly. The actors all seem to be in separate worlds. They’re all giving very good performances within those worlds, but because they don’t connect, the film never gathers energy.

Lady Gaga is the most compelling; Jared Leto, disguised as Inspector Clouseau’s lounge lizard disguise from RETURN OF THE PINK PANTHER, brings the entertainment. And, next to him, Pacino seems to be underplaying, so that’s sort of a bonus.

There are some very funny lines, but most of them seem to be predicated on the idea that Leto’s character doesn’t speak good Italian (which the film is translating for us, using movie magic — it’s one of those films where everyone SHOULD be speaking a different language, so they settle for pretending to have accents). It’s true, some people don’t speak their own language well, but would Paolo really have said, in his own native tongue, “If you coulda smell between my groins, you woulda unnerstan'”? It feels like, if you can write funny stuff like that (I laughed), you could, with a little more care, write lines that the character in question might say.

“Ridley Scott must really love Donna Summer,” whispered Fiona, “because he uses her A LOT.” It’s kind of hard to imagine Sir Rid on the dance floor, and I sort of wonder if he uses her a lot because it’s easy shorthand for the seventies. Most of the songs in this are very easy choices, though I respect them for using Bowie’s Ashes to Ashes rather than the same album’s Fashion. So we know it’s not a Robert Zemeckis movie, no way could he have resisted that.

Not a Tom Ford movie either, a movie with Tom Ford in it as a character — and they’re pretty careful how they handle him, which is fair enough. The film only mocks the dead or criminally convicted, which is pretty much everyone else. It’s most of the population of most of Scott’s films, in fact, which, taken as an oeuvre, are surprisingly bleak, negative and hopeless. Surprising since he’s such a commercial presence. But maybe the idea that what we want is optimistic stories of triumph has always been wrong.

Consider the animated ident of Scott Free Productions. A raincoated man flaps about in what sounds like a darkened lavatory, then turns into a bird and freezes, having run out of animation and becomes a lifeless logo at exactly the point of taking flight, the words “Scott Free” appearing beneath him as a kind of cruel jibe.

Consider BLADE RUNNER, where an assassin less human than the androids he’s hunting gets rained on for two hours, then flies off with the nonhuman girl at the end into footage originally shot for THE SHINING, implying they’re going to land their hovercar at a haunted hotel… until Ridley recut it to turn the hero into a literal android.

Consider THE COUNSELLOR, which might be Scott’s ultimate statement. I didn’t like that film at all but it did seem very Ridley. A summation of sorts. Characters don’t need to have credible motivations (consider the guy making kissy faces at the hideous snake alien in PROMETHEUS which is obviously about to eat his face) so long as their improbable decisions lead to their total destruction and that of everyone they love.

The Guccis, in other words, were made to order for the Ridley Scott Cinematic Universe.