Archive for Steamboat Bill Jnr

The Sunday Intertitle: Moriarty-craftsy

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 17, 2019 by dcairns

I watched the John Barrymore SHERLOCK HOLMES because I’m going to be doing something about Buster Keaton’s SHERLOCK, JR and I wanted to see if this film, released just a couple of years previously, had influenced it. Nothing very very specific, but a general sense that Keaton’s conception of his role and the world of Holmes had more to do with Albert Parker’s film than a close reading of Conan Doyle.

The film is pretty nice! I gave up on it one time before, mainly because it presents Holmes as a moony romantic lazing about country lanes, and knowing Watson when at uni. But it otherwise manages to fold Moriarty into Doyle’s A Scandal in Bohemia and has a very nice cast.

Roland Young in a silent film, hmm — apart from some good slouching, he kind of disappears when he can’t use his voice. But the film gives a lot of the sidekicking to a very young William Powell anyway. Fascinating to see both men with their own hair. (I’m obsessed with hair at the moment because my own hair is retreating like the Maginot Line.)

DW Griffith sweetie Carole Dempster is leading lady, and we get appearances by the likes of Louis Wollheim, instantly recognizable from the way his nose has been compressed into his head until it is visible as a small bump on the back of his neck, and David Torrence, whose brother Ernest would work with Keaton as Steamboat Bill, Sr, and play a memorable Moriarty in the enjoyable 1932 William K. Howard farrago.

Best of all is the Moriarty here, the magnificent, and magnificently named Gustav(e) Von Seyffertitz, the Greater Profile, whose drooping scarf and expressionistic gestures reminded me forcibly of Alec Guinness’s Professor M (for Marcus) in THE LADYKILLERS. Now, it’s known that Guinness modelled his teeth and cigarette-smoking on critic Kenneth Tynan (an actor’s revenge!) but I wouldn’t be surprised if he, or director Sandy Mackendrick, or the costume designer Anthony Mendleson, was influenced by Gustav(e)’s great look.

There’s a fairly purple intertitle gushing about the coldness of Moriarty’s blood —

It got me wondering if the scarf, and the claw-like, expressionistic hand gestures (another Guinness connection) were because Moriarty is literally cold all the time — he’s characterised as a kind of spider, and spiders always start turning up dead at this time of year. I like the idea of a villain whose cold-bloodedness causes him seasonal discomfort.

The Mothering Sunday Intertitle

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2015 by dcairns

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A gentle reminder that the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival will be raging this week in Bo’ness. Among the treats in store is Buster Keaton’s THE NAVIGATOR (screening Saturday), accompanied by maestro Neil Brand upon the piano forte. I hope to be on hand to experience and write about as much of the festivities as possible.

I rate THE NAVIGATOR pretty near the top — not as dazzling as SHERLOCK JNR or as plain great as THE GENERAL, but I like how Kathryn McGuire gets to be almost an equal partner in the slapstick. Her character is exactly as helpless as Buster’s, not more helpless in THE GENERAL (“almost aggressively stupid” was Richard Lester’s affectionate description of Marion Mack’s character) or simply competent and attractive as in THE CAMERAMAN.

I’m not going to try to arrange Keaton’s films in definitive order on a Sunday morning, but I would roughly say that the first rank, for me, contains ~

THE GENERAL, SHERLOCK JNR., THE NAVIGATOR, OUR HOSPITALITY

The middle group, which are not to be sneezed at, would be ~

STEAMBOAT BILL JNR, GO WEST, SEVEN CHANCES, THE THREE AGES, THE CAMERAMAN

And the “lesser films” — ones which are still likely to be better than anything else you might see, would be ~

COLLEGE, BATTLING BUTLER, SPITE MARRIAGE

I realize that this is both subjective and impertinent, and that any attempt to say that SEVEN CHANCES or STEAMBOAT BILL JNR is less than great is likely to look philistine. All I mean to say is that they are LESS great than my top four. But I welcome disputes, if you want to make the case for a lower-down title or knock down one of my pantheon. I will say that I’ve only seen BATTLING BUTLER and SPITE MARRIAGE once, and that it’s been a while since I saw THE CAMERAMAN and THE THREE AGES.

We might also attempt a larger project, a ranking of the short films

The St Valentine’s Day Intertitle #2

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , on February 15, 2015 by dcairns

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Great pleasure in Portobello — Buster Keaton’s ONE WEEK and SEVEN CHANCES on the big screen (albeit via DVD) with live accompaniment by composer Jane Gardner on piano with Hazel Morrison on percussion. A nicely chosen Valentine’s Day double feature, with the short film playing out over the course of a week which, just like this one, includes a Friday the 13th, Saturday 14th, Sunday 15th…

Once again it was great to see so many kids in attendance — the front row was crammed with them, and they were in hysterics. One quacking cackle in particular was a joy to listen to. And at a key bit in SEVEN CHANCES, when it seems Buster is too late to win the day, a cry of “Awww!”

Over a drink afterwards, Hippodrome producer Shona Thomson, Jane, Fiona and I and some friends had a wide-ranging discussion which included our thought on the various troubling race gags in SEVEN CHANCES. Buster is so apolitical, basically accepting the world as it is, that it seems useless to get in a fuss about his more politically incorrect gags, which usually touch upon something unfortunately true (such as the female victim of domestic violence in OUR HOSPITALITY who turns on Buster when he tries to help her). While Chaplin had the sensitivity to see that minstrel-show humour was unacceptable, his response was to basically exclude black characters from his films altogether, which is far from a solution. Harold Lloyd has the occasional bit of the comedy manservant terrified of “spooks.” But Keaton made a Civil War film from the Southern perspective (ironically because, in a rare moment of political sensitivity, he felt you couldn’t cast the losers as antagonists); he blacks up in COLLEGE, and in SEVEN CHANCES …

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Firstly, there’s Jules Cowles in blackface as the hired hand. No excuse for this is really possible. There are actual black people in the film, but for the one major-ish role, a white actor is cast. It could be argued that the gags about this character being dull-witted are the same kind of jokes Keaton would make about his own characters in his short films, but it’s all very unfortunate.

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There’s a startling moment when Buster, puzzled by his inability to get any girl to agree to marry him, takes a look at his reflection to see what can be the matter with him. The mirror he chooses is set in a door, and as he checks his jacket front, the door opens, so that when Buster looks up, he sees a (very handsome) black man in place of his own reflection. He’s startled, as anyone might be (save the black man himself). This isn’t particularly offensive, I don’t think, though it may point towards a kind of racial panic more obvious elsewhere.

Buster proposes to every girl he meets, and there are a whole series of inappropriate/inadmissible woman jokes. There’s one who turns out to have a wedding band, one with a baby, one reading a Jewish newspaper who apparently doesn’t speak English (one hopes that’s the reason she’s ruled out), a drag artist, and one who turns out to be a schoolchild. No particular notice is taken of the lady in mannish attire panned past in THIS shot —

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And then there’s the black woman, whom Buster approaches from behind before reeling away in horror. Now, until 1948, if I have this right, a white man like Keaton would not have been able to marry a black woman in California, so the joke is merely taking notice of an existing fact, I guess. It’s just that the fact in question makes most modern audiences feel sad, and not able to laugh.

And then there’s the other black woman. When an advertisement for a bride brings rather too many hopefuls to the altar, among them is a middle-aged black lady (most of the unwanted aspirants are on the mature side) who either doesn’t know the anti-miscegenation laws or just isn’t going to let them stand between her and seven million dollars. It was Hazel the drummer who spotted the fact that another bride-to-bee is already sporting a prominent wedding ring, so evidently Keaton’s pursuers are desperate enough to throw off all society’s restrictions.

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Keaton is quite rightly beloved, and we generally agree to overlook his occasional lapses. At this historic distance, his willingness to make fun of terrorist bombings (in COPS) and hurricanes (in STEAMBOAT BILL JNR) seem kind of admirable. With the race gags, I kind of like the way we don’t get hysterical in either sense of the word. They just create slightly awkward gaps in the laughter before we can move on to the next bit of comic genius.

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“AWWW!”