Archive for Stan Laurel

The Sunday Intertitle: Raw

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on April 14, 2019 by dcairns

Seeing WITH LOVE AND HISSES at Hippfest with an audience and live accompaniment by Jane Gardner was great — it’s nobody’s idea of prime Stan and Ollie, but it’s a perfectly successful laugh-generator on the big screen. The boys are practically a trio in this, with James Finlayson granted a lot of screen time.

Fiona was convinced that Ollie is swearing in the above scene — “You bastard!” she read his lips. The DVD is definitely not sufficiently hi-res to allow me to confirm this.

But I felt sure Ollie mouths the words “Oh shit!” here, when he and his troop, having lost their clothes in a freak bathing and lit match accident, encounter a couple of dames out horse riding. H.M. Walker’s intertitle supplies more palatable dialogue —

(Lots of discretely framed nudity in this one, allowing us to observe how surprisingly buff Stan is in the buff. Ollie plays his sergeant character as very ruddy-faced, but it may just be his natural golfer’s tan, suggests Stephen C. Horne.)

None of which is as striking as the moment in PERFECT DAY, an early L&H talkie, when Edgar Kennedy actually says “Oh shit!” live, on camera, in the miracle of synchronized sound, and apparently nobody noticed in the general hubbub and chaos that is a Hal Roach production.

 

A Letter from Stan, 1 & 2

Posted in FILM, literature, MUSIC, Theatre with tags , , , , on March 22, 2019 by dcairns

We recorded a couple of minisodes (ugh! that WORD!) for The Shadowcast, relating to our recent Stan & Ollie megasode (deLIGHTful word), United We Fall.

Fiona discovered The Text featured, but to bring it to life we needed a Principle Boy, preferably one with an accent that might pass as similar to that of the young Arthur Stanley Jefferson. Since Stan moved about the UK a lot as a kid, and his eventual adult speech is a bit of a hybrid, we had a fairly loose remit, but opted to search around the area of his birthplace, Ulverston. Here, Naomi Bewsher of Stagecoach Performing Arts Schools, Carlisle and Cockermouth, was our benefactor. She eventually got five lads to record renditions of The Text, and we were supposed to choose one.

Well, we failed — Fiona was enamoured of Joe Campbell-Hillsley’s passionate rendition, whereas I leant towards Evan Low’s more measured delivery. So we compromised, and you get two minisodes for the price of none.

Music by Matt Wand and Marvin Hatley.

Here’s Joe:

And here’s Evan:

And here’s the original full-length megasode:

In strict fairness, I should admit to editing The Text slightly, including combining two drafts (both preserved for posterity by Stan’s dad). But all the words are by young Stan, and all the funny lines are authentic.

Get Packing

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 8, 2019 by dcairns

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES seems to confirm George Marshall’s suitability as a Laurel & Hardy director: good shots right from the start. Not artsy, but striking, and putting into imagery some of what we feel about the characters.

He also makes a damn good sneering villain. I was grateful Stan didn’t follow his usual practice of SHOWING the horrible fate the boys are threatened with… (cut throats, in this case: well, there’s no obvious slapstick iteration of THAT calamity).

In fact, the film is co-credited to Leo McCarey’s tragic brother Ray, who nobody at Roach rated very highly, and the IMDb proposes Harry Black and Lloyd French as unindicted co-conspirators. But I think there’s enough evidence of Marshall’s style to attribute the visual grace notes to his influence.

The plot requires Stan & Ollie to have a couple of friends from the “straight world.” Little Jackie Lyn Dufton works well as an addition to the team: although looking after a kid kind of limits the mayhem the buys can get up to, what’s good about her is she’s NO HELP. A bit like Laughing Gravy, she stands almost as an embodiment of their bond: she is both inconvenient and adorable. Her father has to be gotten rid of for plot reasons early on, and a good thing too: he violates a cardinal rule of their comic universe, by being a regular joe who isn’t annoyed by their ineptitude. This is fantasy is only sustainable by giving him as little real interaction with the boys as possible.

(As an example of the correct use of an unsympathetic world, in this movie the army offers no supportive camaraderie, and an officer deliberately tries to get the boys killed by the enemy because they irritate him.)

The rest of the time the support is provided by growling heavies like Marshall, and a nice range of stooges and apoplectic minor clowns, and though it’s nowhere near as good as their top ten shorts, it feels enough like them (complete with non-stop Marvin Hatley music) and has just enough narrative cohesion and funny sequences to sustain a warm glow for 68 minutes.

Our Laurel & Hardy podcast is here.

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES stars Rhubarb Vaselino; J. Piedmont Mumblethunder; Mickey Finn; Mrs. Wiggs; Ming the Merciless; Professor Gordon; Tootsie Malone; Og Oggilby; Joe Pettibone; Mrs. Hudson; and Mr. Hall.