Archive for Robert Cummings

Dial “H” for Hubbard

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2013 by dcairns

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To Filmhouse to catch the last 3D screening of DIAL “M” FOR MURDER. I’d seen the film before, and written it up for Hitchcock Year, and seen it again in 3D on video with Japanese subtitles and red-green glasses which mess up the colour cinematography, but this was my first ever big screen 3D screening. Most satisfactory.

John Williams as Chief Inspector Hubbard is the chief source of pleasure, with Anthony Dawson’s vulpine assassin a strong runner-up (curiously, both men have more famous name-sakes).

Hitch’s restrained use of the stereoscopic process to chart the dimensions of a room is beautiful, but I also found myself enjoying the worst aspects of the film — the grainy London location shots. Warners refused to pay for Hitchcock to shoot 3D in London, so the street scenes and dock scene were filmed flat. Hitchcock sticks a few foreground objects in to try to add a bit of depth, but the fantastically grainy rear-projection is distracting, and in at least one place surreal —

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Robert Cummings, the Butcher of Strasbourg, approaches his friends’ flat in a taxi — the view through the windscreen shows a flat street scene gradually enlarging — no sense of it getting closer, it just looks like it’s being blown up. We’re inside a 3D taxi driving up a flat street. It’s quite boggling. It’s like this London cab has it’s one zoom lens at the front. That’d be quite a good scam: you get in, pay for your journey, and instead of taking you there, they just zoom in. Then you pay up, get out, and find you’re still where you started from. Only then does the cab roar off, taking your money before you can protest. I’m surprised they haven;t attempted to rip the tourists off that way.

Since Hitch and the 3D camera and his stars never went to London, I got very interested in a scene late on where Grace Kelly is driven up to her flat, gets out the car, and approaches the door. How could this be achieved without Grace going to London?

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Close, skeptical viewing provides the answer. The woman getting out the car is NOT Grace, but a reasonably similar stand-in. Hitchcock follows the dictum laid down by Michael Powell, who had to shoot many of Roger Livesey’s scenes in I KNOW WHERE I’M GOING! with a double. Don’t have your lookalike skulk around behind a cape like that dentist pretending to be Bela Lugosi in PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE. Simply have the phony stride boldly up to the camera in full view. The audience is expecting to see an expensive movie star, and that’s just what they will see if you give them no reason to doubt it.

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Hitch then cuts quickly to Chief Inspector Hubbard watching from the window. When he cuts back, the stand-in is gone and Grace Kelly is there, standing in a Hollywood studio in front of the rear-projection screen showing a London street (and which formerly also showed her double). Deuced clever, these movie johnnies.

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Like Tears in the Rain

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 22, 2012 by dcairns

Hayward is wayward, but never fear, Robert is Cummings! The self-confessed Butcher of Strasbourg joins the flame-haired siren over at The Daily Notebook in this week’s edition of The Forgotten. Which is nothing if not apt — a Forgotten about THE LOST MOMENT.

Ophuls said that the Hollywood composer is like the man who dispenses cheese in an Italian restaurant. You say “Thank you, that’s enough,” he goes away, and then a minute later you catch him spooning more on. “You have to watch him.”

He was talking specifically of Daniele Amfitheatrof, who nevertheless did a stunning job on LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN, and again here. You never hear the Greek mentioned along with his American and Hungarian colleagues. Seems to me he may be deserving of more consideration.

Come on, they’re not THAT bad…

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on August 11, 2011 by dcairns

From the titles of Frank Tashlin’s THE FIRST TIME.

This is now the subject of this week’s The Forgotten, over at the new-look Daily Notebook. Here’s a scene, the Housewife’s Revenge Upon the Erring Hubbie: