Archive for Paths of Glory

Kubrick Boxes

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2019 by dcairns

Mr. George Swine!

When I first handled Michel Ciment’s magisterial Stanley Kubrick, my friend Robert pointed out something unusual about the pictures, which were glossy and coffee-table-suited, but also — “He’s making connections.” I’m not sure a movie book had done that, previously.

(Obviously, I should have connected the fights in THE DAY OF THE FIGHT [where SK proves it’s not a proper documentary by filming the big match flat on his back at the pugilists’ feet], KILLER’S KISS and BARRY LYNDON, and Tom Cruise’s street-crazy palm-punching in EYES WIDE SHUT with Nicholson’s rather more compelling version in THE SHINING, the vehicular love scenes in STRANGELOVE and 2001, etc, etc…)

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Alpha-Omega

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 2, 2019 by dcairns

The opening and closing shot of every Kubrick feature film.

Observations:

Some of these films seem to be talking to each other.

KILLER’S KISS, which in Kubrick’s own revised filmography stands as his first feature (he suppressed FEAR AND DESIRE, top) is the only film ending with anything so conventional as a clinch, but way down at the end EYES WIDE SHUT ends with Nicole’s four-letter suggestion, thus closing a circle of a kind.

The forested hillsides of FEAR AND DESIRE seem to echo those of THE SHINING but if you’re looking at what the shot’s DOING, the real rhyme is between DR. STRANGELOVE and THE SHINING.

STRANGELOVE to CLOCKWORK ORANGE is the sequence I really stand by.

It’s sometimes hard to know what IS the last shot. BARRY LYNDON earns two images, the last live image and the Epilogue card which is clearly part of the film and makes a nice connection with LOLITA and THE SHINING. Likewise LOLITA gets the last shot of Mason, which loops back to the first scene (Peter Sellers is about to emerge and say “I’m Spartacus” just as we hastily fade out), and its final super-title. THE SHINING’s closing shot I’ve represented with two images because it’s a rostrum move.

SPARTACUS is an outlier — I chose to use the first shot of Saul Bass’s title sequence, because the first shot of the film proper, I believe, is by Anthony Mann before he was fired. And the hand makes a nice rhyme with LOLITA…

Adolphe McMenjou

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on March 4, 2017 by dcairns

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Weird.

Adoplphe Menjou (attired as a Scotsman) to Fred Astaire in YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER: “At heart I’m a sentimentalist. I pity you but I love my daughter.”

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Adolphe Menjou (attired as a Frenchman) to Kirk Douglas in PATHS OF GLORY: “You have spoiled the keenness of your mind by wallowing in sentimentality. […] You’re an idealist, and I pity you as I would the village idiot.”

Be that as it may, there is absolutely nothing to be gained by comparing these films.

However, YWNL is a very enjoyable Astaire-Rita Hayworth musical, though light on music — it takes forever for Fred to dance, and we’re fifty minutes in before the first duet. The plot is fine, with just enough plausible deniability to prevent us concluding it’s about Menjou’s incestuous passion for his daughter, Rita (the biology is as unbelievable as the plotting), but it seems to take a long time to work through, with a few really good laughs along the way, admittedly.

Points are awarded for excellent use of Xavier Cugat, who gets to conduct, cartoon, and converse with far smoother integration than in the Esther Williams vehicles he pops up in (generally trying to palm off chihuahuas on Jimmy Durante, though my memory may be exaggerating the frequency of that transaction). And though I think Ginger was undeniably Fred’s best dancing partner in terms of chemistry, it is certainly arguable that Rita is the better dancer.

I can’t believe I snapped this frame grab at random and it came out so great ~

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