Archive for Pamela Hutchinson

The Groundhog Day Intertitle: Sheik That Thang

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , on February 2, 2020 by dcairns

 

Another video essay! I was pleased they let me call this one Loitering Within Tent because SON OF THE SHEIK doesn’t strike me as the kind of film one should be wholly serious about.

But it’s fun! Pure Hollywood Trash, maybe, but executed with a high degree of artistry and some jawdropping kink. Hollywood romanticism at its most nakedly perverse. I kept wondering how much of the absurd and offensive scenario I should draw attention to, and how lighthearted I could be about such stuff. I decided to go for it.

I also found a fan mag interview with director George Fitzmaurice, so I invented a funny voice for him to talk with. He was quite an assiduous courter of the Photoplay readership, so his ruminations have a certain fatuous tone I found hard to resist.

I really like the start of this piece — I think one of the better things editor Timo Langer and I have put together. But the more impressive feat may be turning Valentino into a talking picture star. This film was originally released with a recorded score featuring “turbulent music,” but as you probably know, Valentino died before talkies could immortalise his vocal powers. However, he was earlier recorded singing two songs, one of which, Kashmiri Love Song,  features in the original THE SHEIK. We laid the recording over the footage of him moving his lips, slid it back and forth a few times and, Voila! The Sheik sings…

In addition to our contribution, you get a booklet essay by the insuperable Pamela Hutchinson of Silent London and a video introduction by someone called Orson Welles. A nice team to be working alongside.

 

The Situ

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 16, 2019 by dcairns

In bed to save on heating because it’s COLD. Momo will probably snuggle up later when he’s finished shouting. Fiona’s going out to meet a friend.

I’m going to listen to the rest of the Jovanovich testimony which is HOT STUFF. If you’re not following this, you should be — exciting viewing. It occurs to me that the Republican pols, those not entirely dead to all moral feeling, are in HELL and have been all through this presidency, having to make excuses for this guy who represents the opposite of the “values” they claim to espouse. Good. Their troubles may be about to end, just not in the way they would choose. But I make no predictions. I live by the tenet, “Things can always get worse.”

Still, life in the Shadowplayhouse is fairly pleasant, we went to see the film billed as THE IRISHMAN which, when you get in to see it, turns out to be called I HEARD YOU PAINT HOUSES. First switcheroo of that sort I’ve seen since Polanski’s THE GHOST (according to UK posters) had a fancy end creds sequence in which it announced its title as THE GHOST WRITER.

And I picked up this month’s Sight & Sound, which asides from boasting articles from pals Hannah McGill and Pamela Hutchinson, features two favourable mentions of yours truly on the same page: my video essay for THE BELLS OF ST MARY’S is, apparently, “highly engaging” and part of a “divine set of extras” while the one I did with Anne Billson for THE FATE OF LEE KHAN is “effervescently enthusiastic”. Stephen C. Horne edited both pieces.

I’ll say some nice things about the Scorsese next week. It is not to be missed.

The Shadowcast #10: Welcome to the Hippodrome

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , on May 2, 2019 by dcairns

A crazy and baffling still from THE PARSON’S WIDOW — no such scene appears in the movie — just one of the movies discussed in the first ever location-recorded edition of The Shadowcast, coming to you direct, with a slight time delay, from the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival in Bo’ness. Along with the atmospheric qualities of being on location, you get to enjoy a lot of background chatter and noise, making earbuds probably a necessity for this installment. But if you close your eyes it’s a lot like being there.

I talk to the cousins of James Finlayson, the BFI’s head of silent film, the festival director, Silent London herself, and a bunch of (extra)ordinary punters, about films such as MOULIN ROUGE, AU BONHEUR DES DAMES, THE RED HEROINE and HINDLE WAKES. Let me know what you think of the experiment.