Archive for Louise Brooks

Christmas Come Early

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on December 24, 2014 by dcairns

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From Eureka! Masters of Cinema, an exciting parcel —

First, DIARY OF A LOST GIRL comes with a video essay by yours truly, NAKED ON MY GOAT, narrated by my fragrant wife, Fiona Watson (a Louise Brooks obsessive from way back).

Next up, Lubitsch’s MADAME DUBARRY, supported by his first film as director, ALS ICH TOT WAR (WHEN I WAS DEAD). This comes with a pair of text essays by myself, entitled Who Wants to be a Milliner? and Lubitsch’s Brew, featuring a shout-out to deceased cinephile and official Strange Phenomenon F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre. Oddly, the shambolic, hammy and disjointed early work was a lot easier and more fun to write about than the more accomplished historical epic, but both are essential for Lubitsch aficionados.

These were delivered yesterday along with a couple of extra free gifts which may get viewed and written about sometime during the forthcoming “daft days.” Watch this space.

Both packages are “dual-format,” offering DVD and Blu-Ray versions and can be purchased from the evil tax-avoiding conglomerate Amazon.

Diary of a Lost Girl [Masters of Cinema] Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD)

MADAME DUBARRY [Masters of Cinema] (1919) [Blu-ray]

The Sunday Intertitle: Lulu, Interrupted

Posted in FILM with tags , , , on October 12, 2014 by dcairns

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In collaboration with Timo Langer (editor) and Fiona Watson (narrator), I have put together a video essay to accompany the Masters of Cinema Blu-ray of GW Pabst’s DIARY OF A LOST GIRL, starring Louise Brooks.

This would be a dream job if one could make a living at it, but small fees for fun work are, I think, better than fat ones for drudgery.

You buying the product from the nice evil people at Amazon via this link will bring in a few extra pennies: Diary of a Lost Girl [Masters of Cinema] Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD)

In case you need a better reason:

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The Sunday Intertitle: Silence is Golden

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on September 14, 2014 by dcairns

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Thanks to Mark Medin for aiming me at this one — a follow-up to last week’s Keaton, which was co-directed by Mal St Clair.

St Clair’s THE SHOW OFF (1926) is a movie where we can be truly grateful for silence — Ford Sterling, a longtime Keystone cop, plays a braying jackass who is already rather hard to taken without sound. If we had to listen to him, we’d end up climbing into the screen to throttle the bastard. Sterling plays the chief of the clowns in my favourite film, HE WHO GETS SLAPPED, but he hasn’t got much to do in it and isn’t required to engage our sympathy. His abrasive personality is probably what kept him from being a bigger success, though he was obviously well-known enough.

The film is strictly domestic comedy, with few visual gags and most of the humour deriving from Sterling’s crass behaviour. There’s also a big helping of pathos, with a dying parent and so on. St Clair negotiates the tonal shifts fairly well, though Sterling basically just bulldozers through, the script failing to supply him with much of a redemption. The highlights turn out to be scenes of more-or-less straight suspense, protracted to a nerve-shredding degree at the climax where Sterling ambles home with the money to save the family home, just as his poor mother-in-law is hunting for a pen to sign the property away.

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The film also features Gregory Kelly, who was the first Mr. Ruth Gordon, and who looks Japanese. And then it also features Louise Brooks, which I expect is the reason most folks watch it. Brooks is used quite effectively, and though as romantic interest for the second male lead, it should be a nothing part, it actually affords her some nice moments.

St Clair’s direction is pleasing too, with some dynamic tracking shots that reinforce the swaggering idiot hero’s conceit of himself, as he pushes the whole frame along with his jaunty march. And there’s this ~

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Really nice, and so modern. There’s been a certain amount of debate down the years about whether Brooks was an actress or just a great screen figure. I think she’s the embodiment of the kind of star who excelled in silents and wasn’t so effective in sound, not because of any flaw in her voice but because the rigidity of sound filmmaking stifled what was amazing about her. And then in filmed interviews in her later years she’s quite relaxed (to the point of not bothering to get dressed and doing them in her dressing gown) and you can see the vibrancy again. I guess the Kansan accent wasn’t ideal, and wasn’t what you’d imagine when looking at her in a silent, but I don’t find it a big problem (but then, I’m not American so it has fewer dust bowl associations for me).

Her delicacy and dancer’s poise improve every composition in THE SHOW OFF. A shame more St Clair features of this era don’t survive. And a shame about Ford Sterling.

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Oh, do be quiet, you silly man.

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