Archive for Joe Dest

Sinking Ship

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , on January 12, 2015 by dcairns

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It’s the dying days of WWII (weren’t they all?) and Germany is close to surrender. A general, his catamite, an Italian fascist, a French journalist and arch-collaborationist, and various other unworthies escape by submarine and make for South America where the plan is to lay the groundwork for the Fourth Reich. Along for the ride is an abducted doctor, required to care for an injured Nazi wife, and Rene Clement with his film crew, making LES MAUDITS, an imperfect but largely gripping and very timely 1947 war thriller. With the doctor’s connivance, the pack of rats gradually turn on one another, sweating in the close quarters of their submerged iron coffin…

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This kind of thing needs to be very carefully worked out in plot terms, and it’s a little sloppy, but Henri Alekan’s cinematography conjures the claustrophobic milieu with noir/documentary conviction and intensity — at one point, we pull back along the entire length of the sub from the inside, establishing just how cramped and inhuman it is, and setting up the geography for the grisly adventure ahead. DAS BOOT invented nothing.

Poor Paul Bernard’s facial scarring marked him for weasel roles throughout his career — even during the occupation his characters (eg for Gremillon) always seemed like a commentary on collaboration and betrayal); Joe Dest makes a repellant Nazi martinet, his homosexual obsession with Berlin rent-boy and hired muscle Michel Auclair quite startlingly apparent. Henri Vidal is the staunch hero, whose Yojimbo-like plan to turn his captors against one another could stand greater development.

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*Coughs politely*

Oh yes, and Dalio, as the Nazis’ faltering South American agent, always a master of vacillation and anxiety.

As with Clement’s other war films, the reliance on stock footage, albeit really good stock footage, can be distracting, and how are we meant to feel about REAL burning ships in our entertainment? Because this is smart and sophisticated but it’s still a thriller, DIE HARD on a sub, with less punching and more psychology.

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