Archive for James Finlayson

The Sunday Intertitle: Raw

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on April 14, 2019 by dcairns

Seeing WITH LOVE AND HISSES at Hippfest with an audience and live accompaniment by Jane Gardner was great — it’s nobody’s idea of prime Stan and Ollie, but it’s a perfectly successful laugh-generator on the big screen. The boys are practically a trio in this, with James Finlayson granted a lot of screen time.

Fiona was convinced that Ollie is swearing in the above scene — “You bastard!” she read his lips. The DVD is definitely not sufficiently hi-res to allow me to confirm this.

But I felt sure Ollie mouths the words “Oh shit!” here, when he and his troop, having lost their clothes in a freak bathing and lit match accident, encounter a couple of dames out horse riding. H.M. Walker’s intertitle supplies more palatable dialogue —

(Lots of discretely framed nudity in this one, allowing us to observe how surprisingly buff Stan is in the buff. Ollie plays his sergeant character as very ruddy-faced, but it may just be his natural golfer’s tan, suggests Stephen C. Horne.)

None of which is as striking as the moment in PERFECT DAY, an early L&H talkie, when Edgar Kennedy actually says “Oh shit!” live, on camera, in the miracle of synchronized sound, and apparently nobody noticed in the general hubbub and chaos that is a Hal Roach production.

 

Creature with the Atom Brain

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on October 13, 2018 by dcairns

I’m sometimes credited with an ability to draw surprising connections, but I think it’s life that does that. Here’s a copy of Atom Egoyan’s Martin-and-Lewis inspired erotic thriller WHERE THE TRUTH LIES, with a sticker marking it as the former property of Larbert Library. Larbert was the birthplace of Laurel & Hardy co-star/nemesis James Finlayson. Factor in Jerry Lewis’s oft-stated and demonstrated admiration for Stan Laurel and we might have the beginnings of a blog post, if I weren’t so thick with the cold (and I mean THICK).

I enjoyed some early-ish Atom Egoyan but I worry about this one. It makes me morbidly curious, of course. And I know Colin Farrell Firth and Kevin Bacon aren’t literally playing Martin & Lewis. That would be crazy. But then again, Jeremy Northam once played Dino in a TV biopic of the duo, and that’s every bit as insane. (Very good actor but, you know, no goombah.)

Has anybody seen this Egoyan and would I be wasting my time totally?

The Sunday Intertitle: Primitive Man

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on December 17, 2017 by dcairns

Was there some kind of rule compelling all great silent comedians to make a film set in the stone age? I’m not aware of a Harold Lloyd variant, but Chaplin had HIS PREHISTORIC PAST as early as 1914 (was he the very first comedian to don furs and act Neanderthal?), Buster Keaton ventured into THE THREE AGES in 1923, and Hal Roach, long before his ONE MILLION BC, made the rather simian comedy FLYING ELEPHANTS in 1928, featuring Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy.

Ollie is kind of hard to look at, half-naked in a fright wig, but the dainty way he plays with his club when flirting, as if it were a necktie, is adorable.

Stan also makes for a vaguely repellant sight in blonde curls. Though this movie emerged after the boys had been paired several times, in this one it takes ages for them to meet, and Stan is playing a flighty and poetic youth fairly distinct from his usual brand of simpleton.

This is probably the worst L&H silent I’ve seen, with some titles writer deciding cavemen should speak in a kind of Shakespearean/biblical/medieval argot, Stan spending fully 10% of the running time pulling cactus thorns from his arse, and actual flying elephants (OK, animated drawings) for no good reason.

We do get James Finlayson with a toothache, and a lot of prehistoric mating rituals (the cavegirl flappers are cute), but there’s such a thing as too dumb, even for the boys. Their separation, and Hal Roach’s story credit, gives the lie to his claim to have forged the team, and making Leo McCarey’s right to that honour seem more believable.

By some kind of magic, the laughs begin not with L&H’s first meeting, but immediately before, when the Finn falls down a cliff (always good value). As if the chemistry had seeped through a few rolls of celluloid from the picture’s first bit of Stan & Ollie shared screen time. Unusually, the movie seems to end with Ollie, Stan, Finn and the girl all dead, variously hurled from a precipice and eaten by a bear.

“Good or bad, handsome or ugly, rich or poor, they are all equal now.”