Archive for Jack Clayton

The Sunday Intertitle: Tillie Eulenspiegel

Posted in Comics, FILM with tags , , , , , , on December 13, 2015 by dcairns

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Then Marion Davies is not the girl for you, sir.

TILLIE THE TOILERS is based on a newspaper strip cartoon, but it’s a Marion Davies production and apart from going brunette to match the drawn character she’s up to her usual light comedy tricks. At no point is she required to change costume in a phone booth, as diverting as that would be, or scale a tall building with anything more strenuous than a single elevator.

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The titular Tillie is a secretary on the make, rather callously ditching her beau so as to pursue first the foppish assistant manager, Mr Whipple (George K. Arthur), from whome she extracts lunch, and then a passing millionaire, Mr. Penny Fish, for whom she ditches Whipple with haste and not a little relief. It’s to the credit of the screenwriters and Davies that Tillie remains somewhat sympathetic throughout.

We’re at MGM’s Number One plot here, recycled through several Joan Crawford vehicles a couple of years later — how to marry well while remaining virtuous. It’s OK to be a little mercenary as long as you stay virginal.

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George K. Arthur is an interesting figure — he backed Von Sternberg’s first film, THE SALVATION HUNTERS, on the proviso that he play lead, which he wasn’t very suited to doing. He’s much better as a supercilious schnook here. Sternberg claimed that the budget Arthur promised turned out not to exist, and so Sternberg ended up paying for the film himself.

Returning to his native Britain, Arthur, produced the early shorts of Jack Clayton and Wendy Toye, for which cinephiles should thank him. I’m presuming in those cases the money actually existed. Mr Whipple came a long way.

The Hands of Ingrid

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 2, 2015 by dcairns

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I know, I know, enough with the Halloween postings already! But this one isn’t that spooky. Curiosity prompted us to watch John Frankenheimer’s live TV version of The Turn of the Screw, a piece which only survives because Frankenheimer himself paid to kinescope his shows as they went out (a highly technical procedure which basically involves aiming a movie camera at a TV screen). This paid off, since the director was able to preserve his early work, and also refer back to it, which he found useful when making big movies. Our naive first efforts are often revealing to revisit.

The script for this adaptation of Henry James’ renowned novella is by James Costigan, with a heavy lit-crit emphasis on sexual hysteria as a cause of the ghostly manifestations: even more so than in Jack Clayton’s famous film version, THE INNOCENTS. Incidentally, both filmmakers rely on long lap dissolves for atmosphere, which makes one wonder if Clayton somehow caught the Frankenheimer airing (unlikely), or if something in James’ prose somehow suggests the idea (intriguing).

Recalling the way the BBC’s live Quatermass productions instill a kind of terror through the sheer flop-sweat of the cast struggling to make it through the broadcast without flubbing, corpsing, drying, breaking legs or dropping dead, I was anticipating some agreeable tension here, but Bergman is cool as ice, totally professional, and the kids are so eerily good they chill more for precocity as performers than as characters. Apart from one slight line-stumble early on (which feels quite natural), it’s amazingly slick, and somehow less scary for it.

I got distracted by technical considerations since the drama wasn’t fully engaging my mind. How did Frankenheimer manage scene changes in a narrative where the same character is in nearly every sequence? Here’s a doozy ~

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Dissolve from governess closing French windows to governess’s hands, pressed against the glass of the window as rain pours down outside. Cut to Ingrid at the window.

It seems so simple, yet it’s completely impossible to do live, since during that dissolve Ingrid is literally required to be in two places at one: standing outside in a medium shot, and standing inside at the window with her hands in ECU (plus it has to be simultaneously dry and rainy).

So, I’m thinking Frankenheimer must have had a hand double already in position for that close view. And while it was on air, Ingrid must have sprinted from her position outside to a different window, positioned her hands to match her double’s, and picked up the scene from there. The first televisual hand transplant has been carried out!

I mention this trick over coffee to my editor friend Stephen Horne, and he says, “Ah, kind of like the two Dorothies in WIZARD OF OZ.” Now, I’ve lived with/in OZ all my life, almost, and precisely for this reason, I guess, I’ve never fully unpicked what goes on when Dorothy crosses the threshold from sepia farmhouse to Technicolor Munchkinland. To begin with, she’s apparently sepia, but since this trip is accomplished with a moving camera, we can exclude matte shot trickery. So she’s not filmed in sepia, she actually IS sepia. Some poor stand-in has been spray-painted brown from head to toe, along with the farmhouse door (I wonder if she got sick like Buddy Ebsen, the original Tin Woodsman who was poisoned by his lead face-paint). There’s even a sepia Toto, created using the same technology as the horse of a different colour you’ve heard tell about. As we move through the doorway into the gaudy fantasy kingdom, the camera loses sight of the brown Dorothy, and when she re-enters frame she’s a full colour Judy Garland. The magic of movies!

I wonder who came up with this? Must check my Making Of book. Definitely not Victor Fleming, the credited director — I think we may have to chalk one up for the Genius of the System. It’s the kind of thing a bunch of heads of department spitballing and brainstorming, or brainballing and spitstorming, would come up with together.

I don’t know which is more amazing, the OZ substitution, which effects a change of film medium from b&w to colour, or Frankenheimer’s, which went out live to an unsuspecting nation.

Bob & Margaret

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on December 6, 2012 by dcairns

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I’ve been meaning to write about THE LONELY PASSION OF JUDITH HEARNE for the longest time, but it’s not the easiest film to write about without falling into hyperbole. The last theatrical feature of the gifted and dizzyingly versatile Jack Clayton, it simply has to be experienced, and it all too rarely is. Which is why it seems perfect for The Forgotten, while also tying into our ongoing December blogathon.

Interested parties can explore further by clicking the links below.

UK: The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne [DVD]

US: The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne