Archive for Hugh Griffith

Bligh Hard

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 13, 2011 by dcairns

Am I punning on “blow-hard” or DIE HARD? I’m doing both! And nobody can stop me,  nyahahahaha!

Ahem. Regular Shadowplayer and font of generosity Randall William Cook sent us a copy of the 1962 MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY, urging us to give it a shot. He’s right — it’s a pretty terrific film, undeserving of its lousy rep. But any consideration of the film’s good qualities must take into account the negative stuff accumulated around it, lest it founder on the shoals of skepticism, so here goes —

Reasons MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY has a bad rep —

1) It was an expensive flop.

2) It was a famously “troubled shoot”, losing its first director, Carol Reed, and acquiring another, even older one, Lewis Milestone. The set was plagued by bad-boy antics from star Brando, and word leaked out.

3) It’s not as much full-blooded fun as the original Laughton version, and the ending in particular is a downer (the epilogue, had it been included in the release, would have helped this). It’s still strange to see a flamboyant performance in the Fletcher Christian role and a restrained, realistic one (from Trevor Howard) in the Captain Bligh role.

4) It’s a three-hour epic, with a certain lumbering quality that often accompanies films of this size. Apart from an amazing tracking shot under the rigging as the Bounty sets off, there’s not much filmic energy to fill its sails.

Against all that, the film has a terrific, witty script by Charles Lederer, great support work from Richard Haydn and Richard Harris and a remarkable muted Hugh (“I play the role of a bearded Welshman”) Griffiths, and the stars are really remarkable. I think it probably helps if, like Fiona and I, you have somehow managed not to see the earlier version. Judged on its own merits and according to the goals it sets itself, the ’62 BOUNTY is an artistic success.

As Lederer writes him, Bligh could still be played as a lip-smacking sadist, but that’s not how Howard sees him. Bligh is obviously a deeply insecure man and a terrible captain, and his one resource is cruelty, so he uses it unsparingly. “Cruelty with a purpose isn’t cruelty,” he claims, and Howard chooses to interpret this as a perfectly sincere belief. The result is terrifying — the Laughton villain (whom I have seen clips of) is wonderfully colourful, and you don’t get that from Howard, who isn’t quite into his Rawlinson End phase yet — what you get instead is horrific conviction.

Brando is perhaps more problematic: his choice to play Mr. Christian as a somewhat ineffectual fop is clearly cued by the script, and seems perfectly legitimate. His English accent is very extreme, but quite accurate. The difficulty is that it’s not the kind of voice one expects to hear emerging from a man like Brando. Maybe his body language doesn’t quite match, I don’t know. So there’s a certain discomfort, which audiences are often inclined to react against and blame the performance, but I’m not sure that the discomfort isn’t appropriate. Christian has within him the possibility of heroism, but he holds back on it too long. Seeing he-man Brando imprisoned within this accent, these ludicrous clothes, sets up a slow simmer of unease that ultimately will explode.

There’s a very interesting take on class in the film, with Bligh resentful of his high-born second-in-command. He hates the guy so much, on first sight, that he simply can’t bring himself to listen attentively to anything his subordinate says, with fatal results. The scene where Bligh is finally rebuked by the high command (melting waxwork Henry Daniell), the argument given is that they made a mistake not recruiting a gentleman, which seems entirely beside the point. It’s hard to know if this is Lederer being snobbish, or ironic, or what, but it’s curiously fitting that the movie sours what should be a triumphant moment for justice — this is a film which does seem to wantonly deny us many of the expected pleasures of the first movie.

“Listen to me, you remarkable pig: you can thank whatever pig god you pray to that you’ve not quite turned me into a murderer.”

It’s all leading up to a desperately unhappy ending, with death and disaster for the mutineers. This is like Sidney Lumet’s THE HILL at sea, or Why Revolutions Fail. There’s a spectacular climax, with the ship burning and all, but what with Christian being horribly killed, there’s no joy in it. Brando always excelled at death scenes, though, so you still get showmanship, above and beyond the impressive special effects. The actor lay on a bed of ice to get good and uncomfortable for his big scene (simulating the numbness of the laudanum he’s been given), and the dialogue builds up an image of gruesome third-degree burns which we never see… but when we finally see Brando’s face (the rest of him concealed by a blanket), a bit of grit on his face and his hair slathered down, plus his expression, create a vivid and strange impression of disfigurement.

In many ways this would make a fine, if rather long, double-bill with THE ISLAND OF DR MOREAU. Both movies have Brando, shipwrecks and islands, and are remakes of Laughton films. Both films lost a director early on (one scene in BOUNTY has Brando noticeably wearing a different nose, so must have been part of the original Carol Reed shoot) and continued with an aging veteran acting largely as traffic cop. And both films take a gloomy view of what happens when you depose a dictator — you get score-settling, fractiousness and social disintegration. If history repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as farce, MOREAU is the farce version.

Buy BOUNTY, UK:  Mutiny On The Bounty (1962 Special Edition). [DVD]

Buy BOUNTY BluRay USA:  Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) [Blu-ray]

Advertisements

Things I read off the screen in “Lisa” AKA “The Inspector”

Posted in FILM, literature, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2008 by dcairns

We have to give this film both titles, because neither one is remotely adequate: LISA could be anything, whereas THE INSPECTOR works only as a cop movie, and preferably one where there’s something a bit funny about the titular investigator. But this isn’t a cop movie — after the first ten minutes, our hero (Stephen Boyd) stops acting as a policeman and quickly becomes a fugitive from the law. But somehow the two titles conjoined have a pleasing effect.

The 1962 drama, adapted by Nelson Gidding (THE HAUNTING) from the novel by Jan de Hartog, and “helmed” as Variety would say, by screenwriter-turned-director Philip Dunne, suffers from several kinds of flatness, but maintains a trembling grip on the viewer’s interest via some unusual plot elements and a meandering, unpredictable narrative.

HOEK VAN HOLLAND.

This is kind of a road movie avante la lettre, and we begin on a train — the credits appear over weirdly blue-tinted railroad tracks rushing past, a little iris effect allowing us a bubble of natural colour in the centre of the (pan-and-scanned) Cinemascope frame. This seems a little psychedelic, but turns out to be cinematographer Arthur Ibbetson’s best stab at day-for-night rail travel.

VERBODEN TOEGANG

Lisa (Dolores Hart, whose brief gesture at movie stardom was about to burn out) is on this train, in the company of shady import-export man Marius Goring (who’s by this time grown into his increasingly sinister face) and being shadowed by cops Boyd and Donald Pleasence. The supporting cast of this film is an amazing array of Brit talent. Everybody alights at the ferry station to embark from England, and we get some Dutch signage.

FOR HIRE

These words are upside down, which signifies that the London cab is NOT for hire. Because upside down letters mean the opposite of right-side up ones! That’s an important thing for visitors to London to know. Boyd takes the taxi to Scotland Yard, passing some blitzed-out ruins, which give us a sense of period — the movie is actually set in the immediate post-war period.

DANGER: FALLING DEBRIS

Perhaps this sign, posted at the ruins, is a forewarning of Boyd’s condition. In the next scene we get exposition by the clog-full: Boyd’s fiancee is dead; Goring is an ex-Nazi white slaver exporting girls to South America, but the Brits have no evidence to hold him on; Lisa’s family died in the war and she’s a concentration camp survivor. Boyd vows to stop Goring by any means, even though he has no legal authority on British soil.

Anthony Mann, who directed Boyd in THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE, considered him “no movie star”. The problem is that Boyd, so effective in his death scene in BEN-HUR, is really a character actor who’s interesting when he’s BIG, and dull when he underplays. Mann thought it was something to do with the brown eyes. Certainly Charlton Heston, who lacked Boyd’s versatility and sensitivity, makes an impression with facial micro-movements that Boyd, will all his skill, can’t match.

BLUT UND EHRE

The slogan is printed on a fake S.S. dagger which Goring displays when Boyd calls on him. Goring’s “legitimate” business is this tacky souvenir trade, while his real job is providing flesh for “a kind of house” in Brazil. Boyd punches the guy out and barely restrains himself from shooting the fallen creep. Here he’s a little like Robert Ryan in ON DANGEROUS GROUND, but just enough to make you wish Ryan was playing the role.

Boyd finds Lisa outside — she’d already left by the fire escape. She tells him that Goring had promised to take her to Palestine, where Israel is being formed. She didn’t trust him, but was sufficiently indifferent to her life that she was willing to take a chance. When Boyd tells her Goring’s true plans, she LAUGHS: “Sorry, it’s a private joke,” and this teaser to the film’s biggest, weirdest plot point, kept me watching for a bit longer. So did Dolores Hart, who’s very natural and alive and immediate as Lisa. She doesn’t manage to quite portray the character’s journey from battered cynic to loving, revitalised girl, because she’s too vital at the start, but she’s a winning presence. Movie stars tend to control their faces and make each expression count, whereas her face is all over the place, and she throws smiles and frowns around as if leaving a trail. It’s refreshing.

5436970

Number tattooed on Lisa’s wrist.

Boyd, touched by Lisa, promises to get her to Palestine. Taking her back to Rotterdam, he brings her home to mother, who notes the girl’s resemblance to Boyd’s late fiancee, who was killed by the Nazis, and assumes Lisa is a prostitute who has bewitched her son. Lisa angrily explains that this is impossible — she was detained in Auschwitz’s medical wing.

Right. Yikes. The movie never goes into clinical detail, which is a relief, but also sets the imagination working horrible overtime. What kind of damage has been inflicted that would physically prevent Lisa from working as a prostitute? I can’t think offhand of another film whose plot hinges in this way on the condition of the heroine’s downstairs parts. Boyd is still unaware of this gynaecological bombshell, and the film makes much of the poignancy of his falling in love with Lisa as he tried to transport her to the new Jewish homeland, and her resistance to the idea, based on her belief that she can never have sex, let alone children.

STRYDPERK VAN DODGE CITY

A book being read by Leo McKern, a smuggler who takes Boyd and Hart on as crew for his barge (Finlay Currie, the convict from Lean’s GREAT EXPECTATIONS, sets Boyd up with the position). This should get the duo as far as Morocco, but there’s a problem — Marius Goring has been found dead. According to later plot developments, Boyd and Hart each suspect the other of murdering the Nazi pimp (can there be a more unsavoury job description in any language? “What do you do for a living, Marius?”), but this potential source of suspense isn’t really brought out. Boyd’s old partner Donald Pleasence colludes in his escape from Holland and the group hit the seas.

LYNCH WET DE RED CREEK

Another of McKern’s paperbacks: he likes his westerns.

We get to Morocco and the signs disappear for a looong time. Hugh Griffith plays another, more sinister smuggler, a Welsh Dutchman (complimenting Boyd’s Irish Dutchman and Currie’s Scottish Dutchman) who offers to take the pair to Palestine but at a cost: Boyd must work for him for a year as payment for Lisa’s passage. But there’s an alternative: an American (Neil McCallum, a Canadian who made a steady living playing Yanks in Britain) will take them without such conditions — but Lisa must have a medical examination, since the Israelis don’t want any diseases coming in. The examination terrifies Lisa, I think partly because it’s to be conducted by a character apparently called DOCTOR METROPOLIS*. I certainly wouldn’t want anybody named after a Fritz Lang movie fumbling with my undercarriage. Although DR MABUSE would be worse, I guess.

The medical turns out to be a cathartic release for Lisa, who experiences a quasi-flashback as she tells Doc Metrop her story. Appropriately enough, this features a multi-image shot of eyes borrowed straight from Lang’s METROPOLIS. I wonder if the Doc’s character name preceded/inspired the reference? 

It all ends in a fade to white, and is the liveliest bit of filmmaking in the whole show. The need to treat the sequence allusively rather than directly unlocks some imaginative muscle in the director. Maybe the film has unseen compositional merits obscured by the wretched pan-and-scan treatment dished out by some long-ago TV broadcaster, but it’s the plot and guest-stars that allow it to survive a viewing. Malcolm Arnold’s score tries to convince us that THIS IS CINEMA, but actually just gets in the way.

(Once in a while I find somebody who wants to swap movies, but doesn’t have anything I particularly want, so I take pot luck, and thus I find myself with a film like LISA AKA THE INSPECTOR. And it sits, unwatched, for years, until the night I randomly pluck it out and slot it in the machine.)

Oh, I almost forgot, we also have Robert Stephens as a navy man, sloping around like a spy after Boyd. “You Dutchmen, always on the go!” he rejoices, and I think this may well be the line Robert Stephens was BORN TO SAY. There is such a line for all actors. Anthony Hopkins’ line is “I’m a mercenary ham with the head of a whale!” but no one has written it into a script for him yet.

Stephens informs Boyd that tests have show that Goring died accidentally, falling on his S.S. knife. The authorities would like Boyd to return and clear the matter up, but he’s not being charged with murder. And nobody much liked Goring anyway.

BUT! Browne the American doesn’t want Lisa to go to Israel: now that he knows her history he wants to pack her off to Nuremberg to testify about what was done to her.  It’s clear this would be destructive to her psychologically, and she still really wants to go to Israel, where she’ll finally feel safe. This part of the film was the most powerful for me: some well-meaning people are quite willing to destroy Lisa in order to create a powerful effect at the war crimes tribunal. A sensation of desperation.

At this point, signposts suddenly reappear, helping Boyd chart his way through the unfolding narrative:

AIR ATLAS

Stencilled on the plane to Germany which Lisa doesn’t get on, because Boyd realises she’s in love with him. They make a deal with the Welsh Dutchman and set sail with Arab Harry Andrews. After numerous examples of nationality-muddled casting, the film finally presents a Brit browned-up. Andrews is appalling casting. His accent fluctuates across the globe’s entire surface, and at one point he gets water splashed in his face and turns lighter. Absurd.

MADRE DOLOROSA

Not the most encouraging name for a ship (shades of Dario Argento!), but if Harry Andrews is the captain and he’s wearing body makeup, I guess things can’t get much worse. More double-dealings and plot twists turn up, but after the quasi-resolution of the love story, none of it matters too much. The final leg of the journey puts me in mind of Clouzot’s MANON, which likewise ends with a trip to the new state of Israel, but Clouzot’s conclusion is both bleaker and better. He’s a real director, and Philip Dunne just isn’t. Despite the strange lack of star-power in the central roles, his movie does deliver a couple of unusual characters who engage the interest and the sympathy. It doesn’t quite find a narrative structure that uses and resolves these people, but I’m still reasonably glad I saw it.

Having recently seen an Arab documentary, THE ARABIAN DREAM,  which as you might expect took a more sceptical view of the founding of Israel, this was also fascinating to see as a time-capsule from an era before the Israeli dream really started to turn sour…

*Actually it’s “Dr. Mitropoulis”, silly.

Six Degrees of Murder

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2008 by dcairns

This weirded me out a bit, in a number of ways. I have this flaking paperback called The Secret Life of a Satanist, The authorised biography of Anton Lavey, by Blanche Barton. It is by no means terrific. But it’s an interesting thing to have.

First, this creepy photograph.

Bob and Anton

Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan, enjoys a drink with Robert Fuest, director of his favourite film, THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES. You will notice that despite styling himself like a Hollywood baddie, with the full “upside-down head” look, old Anton is much less frightening than Fuest, who looks a bit like Hugh Griffith in TOM JONES, i.e. a ruddy-faced maniac. Recent pics of Fuest are much easier on the mind — that kind of appearance is less alarming in an older gent.

The Abominable Mr Fuest

Fuest’s films consitute a unique and remarkable body of work — unlike practically every other British horror film director, Fuest utilised the conventions of the genre to create exercises in pure style, like Bava or Argento in Italy. Never very interested in making points, or even in narrative, Fuest’s films are strings of glorious set-pieces, beautifully designed and stuffed to the gills with scintillating walk-ons.

Back to this book: a page or two later, I was startled by this image:

pre-atkins

Well, not the image, as such. They’re called breasts, and all ladies have them. No, it was the text beneath that flipped what’s left of my lid. I’ve read and heard quite a bit about the Manson murders, but never knew that much about the various “family members”. I had heard the story that LaVey was a technical advisor on ROSEMARY’S BABY and played the role of devil in it. So I was be-goggled to find this other connection between LaVey and Polanski. But of course, as Wikipedia tells me, LaVey was notinvolved in ROSEMARY’S BABY at all, so the story that he was probably came out of media speculation/invention from the time of the Manson trial. LaVey was happy to hype himself up at all times, but appears never to have claimed any role in the production.

Manson

The Manson killings do have a weird network of movie connections, though. Victim Sharon Tate was a movie star and wife of Polanski, of course, and appeared in J. Lee Thompson’s EYE OF THE DEVIL, a somewhat jinxed production, as well as Polanski’s THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS. The first victim of the Mansonites was the Polanski family dog, Dr. Sapperstein, named after Ralph Bellamy’s character in ROSEMARY’S BABY, a satanic gynecologist.

One of Atkins’ fellow killers, Bobby Beausoleil, had appeared in a Kenneth Anger film (Anger was chums with LaVey) and subsequently provided a score for Anger’s LUCIFER RISING — the only movie soundtrack ever recorded inside prison. The soundtrack followed an unsuccessful attempt by Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page to provide Anger with a satisfactory score. Intriguingly, an earlier version of the film which STARRED Beausoleil was abandoned after Anger quarrelled with the future killer (always a risky thing to do) and much of the footage was supposedly taken by Beasoleil and buried at one of the Manson’s H.Q.s. One of those hideaways was in fact a ranch containing an old movie backlot complete with fake western town. The ranch was once owned by cowboy star William S. Hart.

Combine all this with LaVey’s connection to Jayne Mansfield, rumours tying Manson to the Monkees, Dennis Wilson, and his obsession with Beatles lyrics, and the Manson affair seems like one of the most filmic murder cases ever. And Manson did show some cinematic acumen by knowing exactly who should play him in the movie of his life:

Hopper

Dennis Hopper.