Archive for House of Dracula

The Crumps

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2018 by dcairns

Further Grant Williams investigation — the Incredible Shrinking Man stars as a psychopath killing strangers on the streets of New York en route to his therapy sessions in THE COUCH. He isn’t shrinking in this one, though, as he might have had trouble getting on the couch, or stabbing people above knee level.

The wonderful Shirley Knight, a memorable New York maniac herself in DUTCHMAN, is his romantic interest and Onslow Stevens plays the shrink, her dad. Stevens had an odd career, it seems — I find him really impressive in his brief role in ONCE IN A LIFETIME (1932) and then he’s in the less fortunate HOUSE OF DRACULA (1945) where he manages to cure the wolfman. Will he do the same for the Incredible Shrinking And Murdering Man? A trickier case, it seems.

We’ll be seeing him again in THEM!

Robert Bloch’s writing credit immediately made Fiona suspicious. The mark of quality — medium/low quality. But he shares that credit with director Owen Crump and a young ex-actor named Blake Edwards.

Now, Crump is an unusual name. And it turns out to have been Blake Edwards’s name — he was William Blake Crump. Which sounds like a Victorian poet and engraver falling unconscious to the floor. Edwards was also sort of movie royalty — his stepfather’s father, J. Gordon Edwards was a movie director, his stepfather was Jack McEdward, a production manager. What I can’t find is any assertion that William Blake Crump and Owen Crump were part of the same family. But they must have been, though probably not blood relations. Step-brothers, I’d say. Owen Crump went on to produce several films for Edwards — WHAT DID YOU DO IN THE WAR, DADDY?, GUNN, DARLING LILI, and they co-produced WATERHOLE #3.

Edwards’ most COUCH-like film is the underrated EXPERIMENT IN TERROR.

Anyhow, THE COUCH gets seriously dull in places, but maestro Crump does attempt some striking visuals, and the acting is all fine. Williams figures out ways to make his good looks seem extremely creepy. I immediately recommended the film to an actor friend preparing for the role of a psychopath…

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Empties

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on July 11, 2017 by dcairns

I love empty sets. They would take these stills for continuity reasons, but, like security camera footage, they always have an atmospheric quality. A little bleak, a little scary.

You may notice that the film is called DESTINY and the director is Siodmak (Robert). And you may know that no such film exists. What they were shooting was released as SON OF DRACULA, though in fact the main character is Dracula, not his son. He has no son.

It’s fun to imagine that Dracula might be as invisible to photography as he is to mirrors and shadows. So Universal, trying to record his exploits on celluloid, ended up with footage of a lot of empty rooms. They had to get John P. Fulton to put Drac in afterwards.

Or maybe it was just that Lon Chaney Jr. was off getting drunk somewheres.

My first thought on the trivial mystery of the non-existent movie DESTINY was, Of course! Screenwriter Curt Siodmak, the idiot brother, wanted a classier title and thought he might persuade Universal that DESTINY would be boffo box-office. What a maroon!

But I have a new-found respect for Curt after reading Donovan’s Brain. So I was pleased to find another explanation, or perhaps a deepening of the mystery.

This set photo is from HOUSE OF DRACULA, a much later entry in the Universal monster series (the last, in fact, not counting ABBOT & COSTELLO). I like how the bat-signal is apparently considered part of the set.

But look! This movie is also called DESTINY, according to the slate. Though it would be amusing to imagine Curt S. still gamely trying to get an evocative, poetic title accepted by the front office years later, he had nothing to do with this film, apart from having created Lawrence Talbot, the wolf man. So it seems like Universal always shot their horror sequels under this false title, maybe to control the publicity until they were ready for it, or something? I know there are a lot of people who know WAY more about this stuff than me, so maybe they can help solve the puzzle.

I have a lot more of these, if you like them.

Things Roddy said during House of Dracula

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on May 3, 2016 by dcairns

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Haven’t done one of these for a while. Fiona’s brother Roddy, who has the chromosomal disorder Williams Syndrome, hasn’t been to visit for ages, because he’s no longer really able to travel without disastrous consequences. There’s really very little information about the effect of aging on Williams people, but as Roddy enters his fifties he’s clearly less self-sufficient, more nervous, and his behaviour is more unpredictable and problematic, necessitating more care and less excitement. He still likes the horror movies he grew up with, though, so we took one round to his place in Dundee to view as he was just released from hospital after having a minor collapse.

As usual, Roddy kept up an attentive non-director’s commentary on Erle Kenton’s HOUSE OF DRACULA, apart from when he briefly fell asleep. Fiona and I also interjected.

The movie begins with John Carradine flapping up to the home of Dr. Edlemann (Carradine is, initially, a bat, which makes his self-introduction as “Baron LaForce” seem questionable).

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Roddy: “What’s he doing ? Is he coming downstairs?”

Fiona: “Has Baron Laugh-horse or whatever his name is put the hypnotic vibes on him?”

We asked Roddy how he would react to John Carradine’s Dracula in real life. He takes a hard line on Romanian immigrants ~

Roddy: “I would say, ‘Get back to your grave where you came from!'”

When Dracula announces he wants to be cured of his vampirism, I took a poll as to whether he should be trusted:

Fiona: “I’d trust him, the way Carradine plays him.” Roddy: “I wouldn’t.”

Roddy: “Two nurses, hmm! There were lots of nurses where I’ve been.” Roddy likes nurses.

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Larry Talbot: “Do you believe that a man can be transformed into an animal?” Roddy: “I do!”

Larry Talbot: “Do you think he can cure me?” Roddy: “Of course he can, Mr. Werewolf Man! He’ll give you a cure for your werewolf impression.”

Dr. Edlemann: “Siegfried! Siegfried!” Fiona: “Chickpea? I’m hearing everyone’s name wrong!”

Roddy: “But where’s the monster? Hiding somewhere?”

Fiona: “So how come he hasn’t become a skeleton?” Roddy: “Don’t ask me, I’m not a doctor!”

Roddy: “Where’s he going?”

Fiona: “He didn’t want to be cured of vampirism, you were right!” Roddy: “YES.”

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Fiona: “He’s transfusing himself with vampire blood? Surely that means he’s going to turn into a vampire?” Me: “Precisely. The one flaw in his plan.”

Me: “And that’s the end if Dracula. HE won’t be back in the next film of the series. We can be quite sure of that.”

Fiona: “Oh, we’re having a weird… thing!”

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Roddy: “What are they doing now?”

Dr. Edlemann’s cat, sensing his new vampiric nature, hisses at him. The doc throws a shoe at it. Roddy: “Missed!”

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Fiona: “Mrs. Overall!”

Roddy: “Was that Frankenstein did something there?”