Archive for Faye Dunaway

And the Oscar goes to…

Posted in FILM, Television with tags , , , , , , , on February 27, 2017 by dcairns

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For a moment there I was feeling a good deal of sympathy for Warren Beatty. As he said, he was handed the wrong envelope. Finding a card saying “Emma Stone, LA LA LAND” he was understandably nonplussed. Had he looked at the ENVELOPE, it would have been clear what had happened, but in the heat of the moment, it’s understandable that he froze and didn’t think to do that.

Except that won’t quite do, because the card doesn’t just say “Emma Stone, LA LA LAND” it also says “Best Actress” or “Best Actress in a Leading Role” or something. Which means it might as well have said “This is the Wrong Card.” Which would be a surprising thing to read, but not actually a confusing one. You might be thrown by it, but you wouldn’t hand the card over to Faye Dunaway to read out.

I don’t blame Faye, who must have thought Warren had lost it, taking so long to read the damn card. So that when she got a look at it, she thought time was of the essence and blurted out the name of the film printed there.

The same thing ALMOST happened in 1985.

Larry Olivier was given the job of presenting. He omitted to read the nominees’ names. Which caused a couple of the organizers a moment of panic — did Olivier read the name of the winner or did he just read the first name, alphabetically, on the list of nominees.

The organizers rushed up to him afterwards and asked him this. “I have absolutely no idea,” Sir Larry blinked. There was then, as I recall, some kind of CAR CHASE to find the only person who actually knew what was supposed to be in the envelope. It turned out that, by luck or good judgement, the right film won. And I think, actually, the best film of those nominated, which God knows is unusual enough

De-forgotten

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on February 19, 2015 by dcairns

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Last week’s edition of The Forgotten got bumped owing to Berlin, so here it is this week. Nobody guess who the image was off or what the film was last week, which is hardly surprising — you would had to have just watched the movie to recall the shot, and nobody out there is watching this movie, which is why I wrote about it in the Forgotten. A neglected production by international shady producers the Salkinds, made right after their THREE MUSKETEERS films with Richard Lester, and starring Milady herself, Faye Dunaway, who’s paired with Frank “Disco Dracula” Langella — already, this sounds like a film that should be better known, and when you factor in Rene Clement as director, a sensation of “where have you been all my life?” starts to obtrude.

Dying Like Crazy

Posted in FILM, literature with tags , , , , , on April 26, 2014 by dcairns

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Finished reading Mark Harris’ Scenes from a Revolution. Two unusually large thumbs up.

(The book also seems to be called Pictures at a Revolution by mistake. I like the Mussorgsky quality of that.)

There’s a story told by Arthur Penn at his appearance at Edinburgh International Film Festival which does not appear in the book’s excellent and extensive coverage of BONNIE AND CLYDE. Now, I don’t know if it’s true, but it seems possible, Penn told it, and it’s funny. It plays into Warren Beatty’s well-known predilection for doing lots of takes, not really starting to act until he’s good and ready, that stuff.

This one will require the use of your mind’s eye, so make sure you have it polished and switched on. Ready?

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The film’s climactic massacre was conceived by Penn, under the influence no doubt of Kurosawa, as a kind of “spastic ballet” — bodies jerking as they’re peppered with bullets, blood capsules and squibs blazing everywhere. It took half a day to get Beatty and Faye Dunaway wired up with the necessary explosives for the first angle. Four cameras were lined up, each shooting at a different speed. Beatty had control of the pyrotechnics — he’s supposed to be eating a pear, and by squeezing it, he set off the fireworks.

Action! The mayhem commences. But, for reasons known only to himself, Beatty does not begin to act. “He just stood there with a dopey smile on his face as a piece of his head blue off,” recalled Penn. Bullets rippled Beatty’s suit, and still he remained, smiling and blinking slowly. “And all the time Faye Dunaway, behind him, is dying like crazy. I wish to God I’d kept that piece of film.”

I’d rank this lost outtake even higher than the one I described here.

Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood
Bonnie And Clyde [Blu-ray] [1967] [Region Free]

What we are about now is a week of posts dealing with period movies from the New Hollywood of the ’70s. Not westerns, so much, mainly ’20s and ’30s settings, and quite a few of them New Hollywood looking at Old Hollywood. Hope you can dig it. Suggestions are still welcome.