Archive for Fantastic Voyage

Prepare Yourself

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on February 4, 2019 by dcairns

          

       

Here’s the full round-up of Shadowcasts so far —

BLACK HISTORY MONTH:

MIDTERM MAYHEM:

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF HORROR:

MINISODE: DASHING THROUGH THE SNOW:

THE FROZEN WASTES:

SPACE MADNESS:

LET’S GET SMALL:

…the latest installment, covering (principally) THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, FANTASTIC VOYAGE and INNERSPACE.

THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN stars Biff Miley; Lt. Eloise Billings; and Munchkin Father.

FANTASTIC VOYAGE stars Messala; Lilian Lust; Marty ‘Fats’ Murdock; Inspector Calhoun; Parnell Emmett McCarthy; Harding; Jackson Bentley and George Lutz.

INNERSPACE stars Remy McSwain; Dr. Rudy Blatnoyd, D.D.S.; Sally Albright; Dr. Miles J. Bennell; Magda, the Maid; Wez; Eddie Quist; Marion Fimple; Dr. Werner Klopek; Dr. Grabow, DDS; Dr. Matthew Smith; Microwave Marge; Murray Futterman and Capt. Patrick Hendry.

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The Shadowcast: Let’s Get Small

Posted in FILM, literature, MUSIC, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 29, 2019 by dcairns

New podcast up!

Fiona and I take a microscopically close look at the TIMELY and IMPORTANT subject of human miniaturization, with a particular focus on THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, FANTASTIC VOYAGE and INNERSPACE. Mike Clelland suggested the middle film, and from there things kind of snowballed. Shout-out to Mike.

Still audibly suffering from slight colds on this one, but the NEXT one was recorded earlier and you’ll hear some seriously bunged-up sinuses on that. Here, we just sound like a sexy, husky couple of Glynis Johnses, than which nothing could be better.

The discussion also encompasses (or brushes past) DOWNSIZING, FIRST PAVILION, BODY TROOPERS, THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN, and there are audio extracts from… well, I’ll let that be a surprise (and perhaps a mystery). Momo the podcat offers his views on the miniature human’s potential as snack.

Annoyed with myself for failing to mention the excellent (if slightly racist) miniaturization joke in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slapstick, which demonstrates the virtue of sandwiching virtually a whole novel between set-up and pay-off (more authors should try that). So I’m mentioning it here.

The 30s novelette He Who Shrank which is quoted from is by Henry Hasse and is worth seeking out online. Other literary works referred to are Richard Matheson’s all-important The Shrinking Man, Isaac Asimov’s Fantastic Voyage II: Electric Boogaloo*, Alice in Wonderland and The Arabian Nights.

The audio mixes at the start and end are designed to make genre fans dance around the room in a gleeful sugar rush. Let us know if this happens. Send photographic evidence.Very small people may already be inside all of us. Is there a message you would like passed on?

*Not its actual title.

Lets Get Small

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2013 by dcairns

fantvoy

Joining us in Edinburgh today are my co-director Paul Duane and Bernard Natan’s grand-daughter, the wonderful Lenick Philippot. Craig McCall, our executive producer and the maker of the wonderful Jack Cardiff profile CAMERAMAN, got in on Friday. All set for our first public screening on UK soil tomorrow. Screening today — the first in the Richard Fleischer retrospective, FANTASTIC VOYAGE and THE GIRL IN THE RED VELVET SWING. The third in the Gremillon season, the silent LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS, with live accompaniment. Mark Cousins’ follow-up to THE STORY OF FILM, entitled A STORY OF CHILDREN AND FILM — his best documentary about cinema yet. And COMRADE KIM GOES FLYING, the first foreign fiction movie shot inside North Korea. My former student Vicky Mohieddeen worked on this one!

But also — FRANCES HA; HARRY DEAN STANTON, PARTLY FICTION; UPSTREAM COLOUR; WHEN NIGHT FALLS; THE BLING RING; WHITE EPILEPSY… Chris Fujiwara continues to do a great job, including his chairing the Jean Gremillon symposium yesterday. We wondered going in if such an event would have made more sense at the end of the retrospective, to sum up, but no — it gave us all food for thought and things to watch out for in the upcoming movies.