Archive for Esther Williams

Dangerous Dan

Posted in FILM, literature, Mythology with tags , , , , , on May 4, 2021 by dcairns

Adventures in the land of Dan — like TEN COMMANMENTS, SAMSON AND DELILAH begins with some blisteringly bright, lurid images, and of course immediately gives up that promising aesthetic to show people standing around in Bronson Canyon or wherever.

Interesting that, as noted by Esther Williams, Victor Mature suffered from, or enjoyed, pica, the urge to eat things you’re not supposed to eat. The cardboard his shirt came back from the laundry wrapped around, anything. I wish he’d brought that into his portrayal of the biblical muscleman. The true source of his strength!

Somebody else wrestles the lion from HAROLD DIDDLEBOCK, while the Big Victor wrestles a taxidermy display, and C.B. DeMille optimistically and haphazardly splices the two sets of shots together. Obviously, one would think, the idea should be to shoot your stunt double sequence first, then cut it down to the best bits and film your star in a series of angles designed to fit with those highlights. Extremely obviously, that’s not what Cecil has done. Midway through he runs out of stuffed lion cut-ins and just jumpcuts the real lion fight all over the place. DeMille invented the nouvelle vague.

Checking Wikipedia I was shocked — shocked! — at how unfaithful all this is to the Book of Judges. Fiona loves this film because S & D’s relationship is “so fucked up.” Which is true. And because Delilah is an unusually smart and active female antagonist/protagonist. She can make things happen alright. If she could only decide what it is she wants to happen. Maybe Hedy Lamarr’s best role/perf, making her possibly the only actor ever to give their best perf in a DeMille picturization.

Groucho Marx, of course, gave this the perfect one-line review.

SAMSON AND DELILAH stars Tondelayo; the Big Victor; Addison DeWitt; Mrs. Eleanor Shaw Iselin; Pentaur; Miriam; Mrs. Hardy; Tom Thumb; Marcus Superbus; Magic Mirror (voice, uncredited); Joe Dakota (uncredited); Mug (uncredited); Jake the Rake (uncredited); Pontius Pilate – Governor; Franz Liszt; Moose Malloy; Superman; Captain Marvel; General Yen; Gordon Cole; Pendola Molloy; Obongo – Pygmy (uncredited); Knife-Throwing Dwarf (uncredited); and Fearless Fagan.

Hollywood, England Expects

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2020 by dcairns

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Two headlines, two movies. The top one is from MGM’s ABOVE SUSPICION, directed by scowling killjoy Richard Thorpe (at least, Esther Williams found him so, and I feel Esther can be believed), in which Fred MacMurray takes Joan Crawford spying on their honeymoon. The second comes out of CONFIRM OR DENY, a Fox wartime newspaper story originally authored by Sam Fuller, who knew war and newspapers. The big-budget recreations of the Blitz are pretty staggering ~

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But I mainly liked it for the thousand faces of Roddy McDowell. Here are some ~

Fritz Lang shot for two weeks on CONFIRM OR DENY before walking off, to be replaced by Archie Mayo. Lang might have enjoyed ABOVE SUSPICION more if he’d had a shot at it: it’s a mash-up of spy movie tropes including business nicked from the original MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (assassination timed to timpani).

The most arresting moment is when Conrad Veidt demonstrates the smooth hinges of an iron maiden — and it’s the very one he was pressed into at the start of THE MAN WHO LAUGHS, fifteen years before in his Hollywood starring role. This is his last film.

Picture Play Magazine had a piece about this prop in 1928, stating that it was now on display in a Hollywood museum: it evidently remained available to filmmakers at least into the forties.

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ABOVE SUSPICION stars Walter Neff; Blanche Hudson; Gwynplaine/Lord Clancharlie; Sherlock Holmes; Ebenezer Scrooge; Aunt Patsy; Miss Margaret Phillibrown; Aunt Milly; Comrade Buljanoff; Mistress Hibbins; Timmons; Adolf Hitler / Franz Huber; Henri Cassin; Evan Adams III; Mrs. Cruncher; and Young Lieutenant – Firing Squad.

CONFIRM OR DENY stars Alexander Graham Bell; Madame Blanc; Cornelius; Ianto; E.J. Waggleberry; Reverend Cyril Playfair; Sir Alfred MacGlennon-Keith; Velma Wall; Mrs. Troll; Uncle Arn; Inspector Lestrade; Sir Mortimer Fortescue; and Knuckles.

 

The Little Woman

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2019 by dcairns

The Doll family, according to the IMDb, made very few film appearances. The best known of the foursome are better known by different stage names — Harry Earles (originally Kurt Schneider) and sister Daisy (Hilda Schneider) appear in Tod Browning’s FREAKS in central roles, and in small parts (sorry!) in THE WIZARD OF OZ and THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH. But Fiona thinks she may have spotted Daisy elsewhere.

An older Daisy — we think — flirts with Cliff Robertson in THE BIG SHOW (1961), a stultifying 20th Century Fox circus pic that just about did for Esther Williams’ career. The distinctive helium-squeak voice and German accent (the film was shot on locations around Munich) convince us that this must be Daisie or one of her siblings. She gives a more relaxed performance here than in FREAKS, and is the high point of the film if it’s really her. If it’s not really her, there is no reason to watch this movie. Really terrible.

And in E.A. Dupont’s MOULIN ROUGE (1928), which we just enjoyed at HippFest (well, Fiona fell asleep, but she couldn’t help herself and she consumed the film eagerly on video later), a troupe of little people are seen performing at the Casino de Paris, and again the female lead in the act looks like Daisy. And in yellowface, yet. Which part of this act is most offensive? Oh, and the fiendish Mandarin seems like a dead ringer for Harry.

The show documented in MOULIN ROUGE evidently featured a whole array of little people, so it makes sense that they’d hire the Doll family in order to bulk up the numbers. It’s a veritable Parisian Munchkinland.