Archive for Erle C Kenton

Things Roddy said during House of Dracula

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on May 3, 2016 by dcairns

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Haven’t done one of these for a while. Fiona’s brother Roddy, who has the chromosomal disorder Williams Syndrome, hasn’t been to visit for ages, because he’s no longer really able to travel without disastrous consequences. There’s really very little information about the effect of aging on Williams people, but as Roddy enters his fifties he’s clearly less self-sufficient, more nervous, and his behaviour is more unpredictable and problematic, necessitating more care and less excitement. He still likes the horror movies he grew up with, though, so we took one round to his place in Dundee to view as he was just released from hospital after having a minor collapse.

As usual, Roddy kept up an attentive non-director’s commentary on Erle Kenton’s HOUSE OF DRACULA, apart from when he briefly fell asleep. Fiona and I also interjected.

The movie begins with John Carradine flapping up to the home of Dr. Edlemann (Carradine is, initially, a bat, which makes his self-introduction as “Baron LaForce” seem questionable).

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Roddy: “What’s he doing ? Is he coming downstairs?”

Fiona: “Has Baron Laugh-horse or whatever his name is put the hypnotic vibes on him?”

We asked Roddy how he would react to John Carradine’s Dracula in real life. He takes a hard line on Romanian immigrants ~

Roddy: “I would say, ‘Get back to your grave where you came from!'”

When Dracula announces he wants to be cured of his vampirism, I took a poll as to whether he should be trusted:

Fiona: “I’d trust him, the way Carradine plays him.” Roddy: “I wouldn’t.”

Roddy: “Two nurses, hmm! There were lots of nurses where I’ve been.” Roddy likes nurses.

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Larry Talbot: “Do you believe that a man can be transformed into an animal?” Roddy: “I do!”

Larry Talbot: “Do you think he can cure me?” Roddy: “Of course he can, Mr. Werewolf Man! He’ll give you a cure for your werewolf impression.”

Dr. Edlemann: “Siegfried! Siegfried!” Fiona: “Chickpea? I’m hearing everyone’s name wrong!”

Roddy: “But where’s the monster? Hiding somewhere?”

Fiona: “So how come he hasn’t become a skeleton?” Roddy: “Don’t ask me, I’m not a doctor!”

Roddy: “Where’s he going?”

Fiona: “He didn’t want to be cured of vampirism, you were right!” Roddy: “YES.”

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Fiona: “He’s transfusing himself with vampire blood? Surely that means he’s going to turn into a vampire?” Me: “Precisely. The one flaw in his plan.”

Me: “And that’s the end if Dracula. HE won’t be back in the next film of the series. We can be quite sure of that.”

Fiona: “Oh, we’re having a weird… thing!”

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Roddy: “What are they doing now?”

Dr. Edlemann’s cat, sensing his new vampiric nature, hisses at him. The doc throws a shoe at it. Roddy: “Missed!”

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Fiona: “Mrs. Overall!”

Roddy: “Was that Frankenstein did something there?”

 

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Fatheads

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on October 19, 2010 by dcairns

The twin attractions of Erle C. Kenton’s GUILTY AS HELL (great pre-code title) are not really leading men Victor McLaglen (a side of mutton dotted with sharp little teeth in permanent death-rictus) and Edmund Lowe (jocular ex-matinee idol going to seed, and fast), it’s [1] the outrageous bad taste, which is at times genuinely foul, reminding us that the liberty of the pre-code era could be used in both good and bad ways, and [2] Kenton’s ridiculously pugnacious camerawork, which delights in thrusting faces and fingers into the lens in giant macro-close-up, or gliding through walls and between scenes as if the whole film were taking place on a series of closely-crammed sets. Which it is.

Movie begins with an elaborately staged murder, with Claire Dodd miscast as the corpse. Kenton pulls out all the stops like a ’30s American Argento ~

Fast-talking reporter Lowe explodes into the cop shop, where flatfoots sit around idly, listening to the radio. “Say, how much would you guys charge to haunt a house?” Then he exchanges wisecracks, insults, and out-and-out abuse with detective McLaglen. The partnership is much like McLaglen and Oakie in MURDER AT THE VANITIES: brassy, vulgar and stoopid. And yet they love each other.

Called to the murder scene, the police and press set out competing as to how outrageously they can disrespect the dead, insult the witnesses and pillage the crime scene. One cop raids the refrigerator, while Lowe pockets the photographs of the victim. Then he taps cigarette ash on the corpse. McLaglen tosses a scrunched-up gum wrapper at the corpse. “Bullseye.” Great character actress Elizabeth Patterson quite rightly expresses horror at these outrages, and we’re meant to be amused.

The movie never quite recovers from making its stars so hateful in the first minutes of the story, but things pick up when the putative good guys have to save an innocent man from death row (Richard Arlen, who always seems to be an innocent man on death row). They’re kind of obliged, y’see, since they put him there. The resulting confrontations see Kenton rehearsing for the 3D movie he’d never make ~

People sit up or step forward into leering, porous close-up, then jab their stubby digits in our eyes, giving the focus-puller repetitive strain injury. Fun stuff, if cartoony.

Result: Arlen the perpetual patsy is freed, the real killer snuffs it, and Lowe sits on his corpse. The End.