Archive for Eric Blore

Giraffes on Fire

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2017 by dcairns

We decided to take a look at the Lone Wolf series because of comedy sidekick Eric Blore, and the ones of most interest were naturally those with Warren William, the starving lion, as the Lone Wolf himself, called Michael Lanyard in his daily life. Due to his habit of hanging round people’s necks, I presume. Anyway, having quite enjoyed films in The Saint and Perry Mason series, it seemed like a fresh set of programmers would be a nice thing to draw upon.

But due to sheer incompetence we ended up watching probably the only WW WOLF movie that DOESN’T have Eric Blore, THE LONE WOLF SPY HUNT. While Leonard Carey is a decent manservant type, one can’t help sighing as one imagines what a talent like Blore would make of his business. What reserves of lisping, seething and grimacing he could pour into it.

Still, this one has Ida Lupino, not yet a big star, and Rita Hayworth, not yet a bigger one. The same year she’d be coached through ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS by Howard Hawks and emerge with credit, as actors usually did under his tutelage, but here she’s talking in a strange, over-enunciated way, as if she’s been to the same teacher as Marilyn Monroe. It’s not just like Monroe, it’s like Monroe reciting her toothpaste commercial in THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH.

Like most of these things, it starts amusingly and then chunters on way too long (71 minutes, in this case, is way too long) with most stuff played too slow and too under-rehearsed.

Still ~ surrealist party! With Ida Lupino as a flower-headed woman out of Dali. And another woman wearing a bird-cage on her head, anticipating Anais Nin in INAUGURATION OF THE PLEASURE DOME. You can’t ask for your money back after that.

Gingergangers

Posted in Dance, FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 30, 2017 by dcairns

SHALL WE DANCE is perhaps not quite as good as THE GAY DIVORCEE or TOP HAT but then nothing is. It has Fred and Ginger and Gershwin tunes and Mark Sandrich directing a script by a whole gang including series regulars Adrian Scott and Ernest Pagano.

Edward Everett Horton and Eric Blore (as Cecil Flintidge: clearly a role he was born for) are back as support for Fred and Ginger, but there’s no Erik Rhodes this time — Fred has taken the funny foreigner part for himself. He plays Peter P. Peters, whose stage name, Petrov, causes Ginger to expect him to be a sombre, pompous Russian ballet star before she’s met him. Overhearing her remarks, Fred resolves to BE a stage Russian (for some reason, Fred always sets out to annoy Ginger when they first meet).

His goofy Russian is hilarious, though, part Erik Rhodes, part Lugosi. He prances about the room, striking Slavic attitudes, he says “Ochi Chernye” as if it were a greeting, and ends with “I mos’ go. I mos’ go to Mos-go!” Very silly indeed.

Fred also dances with the art deco engine room of the Queen Anne, a film first. RKO’s idea of an ocean liner is probably somewhat credible — I bet 1930s liners really were built in the streamlined style. But I doubt their engine rooms were white, moderne palaces of engineering with mirrored floors and a spare double bass to slap.

The movie is so entertaining it can delay the appearance of Blore for almost half its length, and wait even longer for Fred and Ginger to dance together. We get They All Laughed and Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off (on rollerskates!), and lots of crazy farce plotting, including an uncanny development where Jerome Cowan tries to substantiate the fake news that Astaire & Rogers are married by smuggling a sort of fembot duplicate of Miss R. into Fred’s bedchamber.

Later, Fred finds the automaton stashed in a cupboard. His reaction reminded me of someone ~

Pierre Batcheff in UN CHIEN ANDALOU.

Also, Ginger has a very cute little dog.

This little nameless trouper is a natural! He burns up the screen! Fiona thought he was the cutest dog ever — he draws the eye throughout Fred’s rendition of They Can’t Take That Away from Me by being adorably sleepy. But I had to remind her of the puppy in THE YOUNG IN HEART with the one big dark eyebrow. It’s a close run thing. You can vote on it if you like.

Did he grow up to be the dog from YOJIMBO?

“Jane of Aylesbury” in THE YOUNG IN HEART. Pretty stiff competition.

Film climaxes with the eeriest number of all Fred & Ginger extravaganzas, featuring as it does a chorus of girls in detachable Ginger masks (reminding Fiona of Sheryl Lee removing her face in Twin Peaks: The Return) and also the alarming Harriet Hoctor, a diabolical creature from an alternate dimension, or else a freak born, by a cruel caprice of Mother Nature, with half her body upside down. The feather gown adds to her unreality by making her seem weightless. It’s all a bit much. She never caught on.

GOD PLEASE NO TAKE IT AWAY TAKE IT AWAY KILL IT

More Blore

Posted in FILM with tags , on May 9, 2017 by dcairns

Blore #2: The Affronted Look. Immediately pre-seething.

Having introduced Marvelous Mary to the works of supporting comic Eric Blore, we now find ourselves feeding an obsession. Mary may never wish to see a non-Blore film the rest of her life.

So here’s a little appreciation of the Great Man, via The Chiseler, to help Mary and the rest of you along until your next fix.