Archive for Dark Star

Dramatis Personals

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 6, 2019 by dcairns

CONQUEST OF SPACE stars Mr. McGuire; Gil Favor; Hunk Houghton; Frank DeFazio; Harding; Judy’s Father; Tommy Chan; Artemus Gordon; Nazorine; Sweet Sue; and Rosemary Clooney as herself.

IKARIE XB1 stars a bunch of Czechs. Maybe some Slovaks. Sorry.

SPACEFLIGHT IC-1 stars Clay Halliday; Phoebus; Number 42; Harriet Zapper; Oliver Twist.

DARK STAR stars no stars.The podcast, SPACE MADNESS:

If you’re wondering why I keep talking about it, instead of just posting once and moving on, it seems that if I continually mention the thing, we get more downloads.

Then there’s episode 4, THE FROZEN WASTES:

 

There’s the minisode, starring a bunch of long-dead people:

Episode 3, THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF HORROR:

Episode 2, MIDTERM MAYHEM.

MAD CITY stars Tony Manero; Ratso Rizzo; Elizabeth Short; Capt. Benjamin Franklin ‘Hawkeye’ Pierce; Miss Trout; Richard Thornburg; and Jame Gumb.

WAG THE DOG stars Ratso Rizzo; Travis Bickle; Marion Crane (2); Larry Flynt; Captain Stacy; Mary-Jane Parker: and Barbarosa.

BULWORTH stars Clyde Barrow; Jinx Johnson; Basher Tarr;  Mary Sunshine; Sam Gamgee; Jackie Harris/Gilligan; Porthos; Henry Kissinger; Max Corkle; and Zorro, the Gay Blade.

Here it is:

Episode one, BLACK HISTORY MONTH.

SAPPHIRE stars Professor Jerusalem Webster Stiles; Constance Wilde; Dr. Henry Jekyll/Mr. Edward Hyde; Capt. Cyrus Harding; Joe Gargery; Pinder; Chief Inspector Maigret; Valeria Watt; Cinzia Hichcock; Tumak; Grouty; and: Q.

POOL OF LONDON stars An American Airman; Vi Sandigate; Princess Katherine; Pinder; Kitty Feathers; Frederick Delius; Sir Lancelot Spratt; Shagal the Inn-keeper; and the voice of The Sorting Hat.

FLAME IN THE STREETS stars Captain R.F. Scott R.N.; the Queen Mother; Maggie Hobson; Pinder; Albert Steptoe; Big William; and Daphne Honeybutt.

Here:

 

New Year, New Podcast

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 1, 2019 by dcairns

Happy New Year!

Fiona, myself, and Momo the spacecat venture into the trackless voids of interstellar space in our latest podcast, proving that the space between the stars will MAKE YOU CRAZY. Examples include George Pal’s CONQUEST OF SPACE, Jindrich Polak’s thoughtful Czechoslovakian Stanislaw Lem adaptation IKARIE XB-1, Bernard Knowles’s goofy but ambitious Brit nonstravaganza SPACEFLIGHT IC-1: AN ADVENTURE IN SPACE, and John Carpenter and Dan O’Bannon’s existential comedy DARK STAR.

Take your protein pills and put your helmet on.

Dynamic Conflict

Posted in FILM, literature with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by dcairns

I got Dan O’Bannon’s Guide to Screenplay Structure for Christmas, and it’s quite good — one of the best of these damn screenwriting books. I can’t bear Syd Field’s books, the man thinks “sets up” is one word, spelled “setsup” like “catsup.” True, he has slightly more screen credits than Robert McKee, but no feature film ones, and his TV writing credits are for a show he produced: in other words, he gave himself the job.

O’Bannon actually wrote movies, and had the debilating health problems to prove it. This is from Michael Wiese Productions, who do good film books by actual filmmakers, and it shares a melancholic quality with editor Sam O’Steen’s Cut to the Chase: it’s been published post-mortem, with much work from other hands to make a book of it. O’Steen had his wife, a fellow editor, to interview him and prompt his memories, O’Bannon has co-author Matt R. Lohr. I’m going to go ahead and blame him for getting the plot of King Lear wrong.

But the selling point here is O’Bannon’s unique take on the three-act structure. I’m with actual writer Ed Solomon on this one — reading screenwriting books before you start writing will just do your head in. If you write something decent, the books can sometimes be useful to help tighten it and make it work better. I’d encountered O’Bannon’s theories before in an interview he gave to a screenwriting magazine. There’s not much new here, certainly not enough to fill a book, but NONE of these manuals have enough in them to fill their page count. All you can hope for is that the good stuff will actually be good.

O’Bannon’s chief innovation is to better define the Act Two Curtain — in his formulation, at this point, “the doors close” — before this approximate three-quarter mark, leading into the climax, the protagonist and antagonist could theoretically have walked away from their conflict (yes, as always, the assumption is that this will be a conflict-based narrative: see Mackendrick’s On Film-Making for a bracing alternative). After this curtain, the characters are locked in to their struggle. Sometimes one has committed an act so awful towards the other than vengeance is now imperative; sometimes, one has been revealed to pose an existential threat to the other. I guess in JAWS, when the boat starts to sink, Sheriff Brody is committed to seeing the thing through.

In that same old screenwriting mag I read another movie hack claim that DIE HARD was all third act from about fifteen minutes in, but O’Bannon’s theory disproves this nicely. It may seem to be all climax, but just where a Second Act Curtain should be, our hero is told he can relax and leave it to the FBI now, and then discovers the terrorists are going to blow everyone up and ONLY HE CAN STOP THEM. Classic O’Bannon, though written by three other guys.

One always finds oneself talking about really commercial, manly stuff when attempting to prove screenwriting theories. One successful guide uses THE KARATE KID as its paragon. This alone should make us skeptical. But if you’re interested in screenwriting, test O’Bannon’s theory against movies you love. I might try this in a follow-up post.

O’Bannon’s other best point is where he blasphemously trounces the idea that Acts One, Two and Three should end or begin on a specific page, or a specific minute of screen time. He points out that the audience doesn’t know what time it is. He’s right. I think we DO get a sense, when we’re watching a film, that This has been going on a long time and we still don’t know what it’s about, when the first act is a long time in reaching its curtain. But we can get that feeling in fifteen minutes, if the first act is really boring, as I just did with a screener I was viewing for Edinburgh Film Festival, a would-be horror movie that began with half an hour of conversations. And sometimes we can get to the end of a film without once having that feeling, and STILL not know what the film was about, as I did with another movie, a thoroughly convincing and beautiful art-house job.

The surest ways to avoid activating the audience’s internal clock is to tell an engaging story or unfold a tapestry of cinematic beauty. And let the curtains fall where they will.

Dan O’Bannon co-wrote DARK STAR, ALIEN and TOTAL RECALL.