Archive for Cops

The Sunday Intertitle: Gas-s-s-s Again

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2018 by dcairns

You don’t expect the disturbing from Harold Lloyd, the sunniest of the great silent comedians. The darkest business I knew of before watching RING UP THE CURTAIN was the menacing hobo in GRANDMA’S BOY, played by Dick Sutherland with considerable subhuman meanness. Critic Walter Kerr actually identified Lloyd’s unproblematic outlook as a problem: he risked blandness by being so All-American and nice and positive. The glasses helped suggest vulnerability, but as Kerr says, Keaton and Chaplin carried a shadow within them. So to avoid things getting too comfy, Lloyd heaped troubles on his character: hence those tall buildings.

RING UP THE CURTAIN is an early knockabout, when Lloyd hasn’t fully determined the parameters of his character or approach, I’d say: there was considerable flexibility in what Lloyd could embody (city swell or country boy) but he wasn’t generally loutish. In this one, he’s dressed all droog-like as a stage-hand, knocking over little people left right and centre. He tramples a dwarf, like Mr. Hyde carelessly knocking down that urchiness. There’s a romance (with Bebe Daniels) but it’s pursued with competitive toughness (Lloyd is often fiercely competitive, even later), which certainly doesn’t prepare you for him KILLING HIMSELF at the end.

Lloyd could do gags about attempted suicide and make that work fine with his persona, as did Keaton. Buster even succeeds at the end of COPS, which is a little dark and disturbing even for him. But in that case, the situation is comic and the neat structure establishes some kind of framework of APPROPRIATENESS. The Lloyd ending is just one of those random “how do we finish it?” jobs, with somebody saying, “Would it be funny if…?” and nobody else thinking of a better idea that week.

But really, Harold (and producer Hal Roach and director Alf Goulding), having your hero put his mouth to the gas nozzle and asphyxiate himself is not a socko finish.

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The St Valentine’s Day Intertitle #2

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , on February 15, 2015 by dcairns

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Great pleasure in Portobello — Buster Keaton’s ONE WEEK and SEVEN CHANCES on the big screen (albeit via DVD) with live accompaniment by composer Jane Gardner on piano with Hazel Morrison on percussion. A nicely chosen Valentine’s Day double feature, with the short film playing out over the course of a week which, just like this one, includes a Friday the 13th, Saturday 14th, Sunday 15th…

Once again it was great to see so many kids in attendance — the front row was crammed with them, and they were in hysterics. One quacking cackle in particular was a joy to listen to. And at a key bit in SEVEN CHANCES, when it seems Buster is too late to win the day, a cry of “Awww!”

Over a drink afterwards, Hippodrome producer Shona Thomson, Jane, Fiona and I and some friends had a wide-ranging discussion which included our thought on the various troubling race gags in SEVEN CHANCES. Buster is so apolitical, basically accepting the world as it is, that it seems useless to get in a fuss about his more politically incorrect gags, which usually touch upon something unfortunately true (such as the female victim of domestic violence in OUR HOSPITALITY who turns on Buster when he tries to help her). While Chaplin had the sensitivity to see that minstrel-show humour was unacceptable, his response was to basically exclude black characters from his films altogether, which is far from a solution. Harold Lloyd has the occasional bit of the comedy manservant terrified of “spooks.” But Keaton made a Civil War film from the Southern perspective (ironically because, in a rare moment of political sensitivity, he felt you couldn’t cast the losers as antagonists); he blacks up in COLLEGE, and in SEVEN CHANCES …

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Firstly, there’s Jules Cowles in blackface as the hired hand. No excuse for this is really possible. There are actual black people in the film, but for the one major-ish role, a white actor is cast. It could be argued that the gags about this character being dull-witted are the same kind of jokes Keaton would make about his own characters in his short films, but it’s all very unfortunate.

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There’s a startling moment when Buster, puzzled by his inability to get any girl to agree to marry him, takes a look at his reflection to see what can be the matter with him. The mirror he chooses is set in a door, and as he checks his jacket front, the door opens, so that when Buster looks up, he sees a (very handsome) black man in place of his own reflection. He’s startled, as anyone might be (save the black man himself). This isn’t particularly offensive, I don’t think, though it may point towards a kind of racial panic more obvious elsewhere.

Buster proposes to every girl he meets, and there are a whole series of inappropriate/inadmissible woman jokes. There’s one who turns out to have a wedding band, one with a baby, one reading a Jewish newspaper who apparently doesn’t speak English (one hopes that’s the reason she’s ruled out), a drag artist, and one who turns out to be a schoolchild. No particular notice is taken of the lady in mannish attire panned past in THIS shot —

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And then there’s the black woman, whom Buster approaches from behind before reeling away in horror. Now, until 1948, if I have this right, a white man like Keaton would not have been able to marry a black woman in California, so the joke is merely taking notice of an existing fact, I guess. It’s just that the fact in question makes most modern audiences feel sad, and not able to laugh.

And then there’s the other black woman. When an advertisement for a bride brings rather too many hopefuls to the altar, among them is a middle-aged black lady (most of the unwanted aspirants are on the mature side) who either doesn’t know the anti-miscegenation laws or just isn’t going to let them stand between her and seven million dollars. It was Hazel the drummer who spotted the fact that another bride-to-bee is already sporting a prominent wedding ring, so evidently Keaton’s pursuers are desperate enough to throw off all society’s restrictions.

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Keaton is quite rightly beloved, and we generally agree to overlook his occasional lapses. At this historic distance, his willingness to make fun of terrorist bombings (in COPS) and hurricanes (in STEAMBOAT BILL JNR) seem kind of admirable. With the race gags, I kind of like the way we don’t get hysterical in either sense of the word. They just create slightly awkward gaps in the laughter before we can move on to the next bit of comic genius.

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“AWWW!”

The Sunday Intertitle: Poles Apart

Posted in FILM with tags , , on November 13, 2011 by dcairns

Had the folks round to dinner, and we watched COPS and MY WIFE’S RELATIONS as a post-prandial entertainment. COPS is, of course, one of Buster’s finest shorts (and my parents were interested to see where I’d stolen the ending of my film CRY FOR BOBO from), while MWR is a more minor work, notable for its rather harsh view of wedlock and its robustly hateful view of Irish-Americans (but Joseph Keaton Snr was of Scots-Irish origins* so it’s fine).

But it did give rise to a question — when Buster and a strange woman get accidentally married by a Polish judge, is the judge speaking actual Polish words, or just Polesque or Polesatz? The former option would be an early example of Buster’s perfectionism and realism, which properly takes hold in his feature film period. The latter would be symptomatic of his ludic side and his bracing disregard for racial sensitivities (already much in evidence in this film).

So, it’s hardly a pressing question, but my experience has been that whenever I ask a question like this, somebody out there can answer it, so…

*In a case of mixed Scots-Irish parentage, the Irish genes always dominate. That’s science, that is.

 

Masters of Cinema’s box set of all Keaton’s short film appearances is now only £18!

Buster Keaton – Collector’s Edition (Box Set) (Five Discs) (DVD)