Archive for Claude Autant-Lara

Whore Leave

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 7, 2015 by dcairns

 

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“If she’s not a whore, she’s a bore,” was one of Billy Wilder’s writing rules, but it’s not as bad as it sounds. In an era where women were typed as sexually virtuous or otherwise (unlike today, of course), Wilder excelled because he rejected such black-and-white distinctions, always looking for the lustiness of the virgin or the romantic leanings of the slut.

THE WORLD’S OLDEST PROFESSION is a 1967 compendium film which largely misses any such nuance, but it’s of some interest since it’s one of the few places where you can see the nouvelle vague and the Cinema du Papa butting up against one another. What makes the whoring boring is that nearly all the (male) directors adopt a jocular tone which seems quaint to the modern viewer, and not particularly funny. It probably doesn’t help that the film’s chronological traipse through history prevents the producers from leading with the strongest short. Michele Mercier dons fur bikini for Franco Indovina, showing prostitution to be as old as the sabre-tooth, Mauro Bolognini visits ancient Rome ahead of Fellini with Elsa Martinelli as an aloof empress, Philippe de Broca posits Jeanne Moreau in the age of the French Revolution, but none of them has any real wit, perhaps because none of them really has anything to say about the subject. It’s sometimes the case in anthologies that the one with the least reputation will try the hardest, and here German TV director Michael Phleghar Pfleghar transcends his unattractive surname, which sounds like a nasty lung infection, with a jaunt through the Belle Epoque in the company of Raquel Welch. For all its breezy tone, trendy technique (zooms AND freeze frames, Herr Pfleghar?) and luscious art nouveau sets, this earns points for daring to suggest that making a living on your back might not be all jollity and multiple orgasms.

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Claude Autant-Lara tackles sex work in the sixties. Perhaps he was desperate to show himself up-to-date and with it. But actually, though he doesn’t have any point to make in particular, his tall tale about a belle de nuit and her chauffeuse/poncette is the most amusing of the film’s chapters. It has a walk-on by the great Dalio, who outclasses everyone around him, and it has a number of daft ideas bolted together in a ramshackle but at least unpredictable manner.

The next transition is where it gets exciting, as we cut directly from a director who dates from the avant-garde scene of the twenties, to Monsieur Contemporaire himself, Jean-Luc Godard, who effortlessly blows his predecessors out of l’eau with ANTICIPATION, OU L’AMOUR EN L’ANS 2000, a slight reprise of ALPHAVILLE and a farewell to wife/muse/collaborator Anna Karina. I’m sure I read somewhere that the movie was a contemptuous send-off, with JLG humiliating his straying wife with a shot where she drinks from a spray can, framed to look as if she’s being urinated on. I’m not sure I buy this. One would have to ask what Godard has against his male star, since he films him the same way, and one would have to assume that Karina had no idea what was going on and was incapable of defending herself. The spray is a fine mist, not a squirt of liquid as it easily could have been, and just seems part and parcel with the movie’s bizarro sci-fi nonsense.

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Judge for yourself. Hmm, it may be a tiny bit sexual.

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Heh heh heh.

Whereas Lemmy Caution drove into Alphaville from outer space in a car, our slow-talking hero (from a world where time moves at a different rate) jets into planet earth by plane, in shots recalling LA JETTEE, only moving. As with his ETRANGE AVENTURE, the director conjures his future world entirely from available locations, in this case CDG Airport and an anonymous hotel. The first woman provided for our weary traveller doesn’t stimulate him because she won’t talk, though she does have a remarkable dress, which she removes — Godard serves up b&w photography, avant-garde soundscapes, and full-frontal nudity, making his segment seem like not just a different era but a different century of cinema from the rest.

(It’s interesting that when intellectual filmmakers like Herzog (in WILD BLUE YONDER) and Godard do scifi, the science tends to be completely bogus pulp nonsense. The genre conventions of sci-fi are ripe for satire always, but are these smart guys really so ignorant or uninterested in the way things work? And throwing in random science words is only a very vague approximation of how pulp space operas operate.)

Karina is shipped in as replacement and explains that in the far-flung year 2000, prostitutes all specialise, so that they either do physical stuff or just talk. So Karina just talks, or rather recites. Like Captain Kirk, the visitor must show her the ways of love… The show isn’t any more progressive politically than those before it — Godard was pretty slow to “get” feminism (BRITISH SOUNDS, made for Granada Television in the UK, addresses women’s issues with a short discussion in voice only while the camera stares impassively at a naked pubic triangle, as tone-deaf a visualisation as you could wish for; and as late as ARIA he was still using naked women as set dressing) but cinematically it’s advanced, alright. The writer B. Kite once suggested to me a good way to view the old and new waves. There was undoubtedly brilliant popular music before rock ‘n’ roll, but its arrival released a lot of energy.

Pork Suitcases Over Paris

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , , , , on September 14, 2013 by dcairns

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Having very much enjoyed Claude Autant-Lara’s L’AUBERGE ROUGE, we turned with enthusiasm to LA TRAVERSEE DE PARIS aka FOUR BAGS FULL unofficially aka PIGS ACROSS PARIS, made in 1956 but set during the Occupation. Black market meat man Bourvil reluctantly takes on a new partner, Jean Gabin, to help him transport a newly dismembered pig across town in four suitcases to a buyer in Montmartre. Gabin proves to be a temperamental and dangerous co-conspirator in the midnight meat trade.

When did Gabin change from the muscular hero of MOONTIDE, whose physique impressed me no end, to the bulbous curmudgeon here? He looks like a Drew Friedman cartoon of Gerard Depardieu. Still, his ability to explode like a fleshy Hindenburg is undiminished by the passage of years and the accretion of bulk. Bourvil is both a droll comedian and a gifted actor, well-matched in his hangdog lassitude to his ebullient companion.

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One thing that’s a little disconcerting is the volume of the playing — quite apart from several scenes where everybody yells at the top of their lungs, the theatrical performance style Autant-Lara encourages in his comedies seems an awkward fit to a story about subterfuge — in loud voices, our two heroes debate business strategies for their criminal venture while trudging deserted streets after dark where police and military patrols can, and do, appear at any moment. The only thing to do with this unrealistic quality is get used to it — maybe it helps that the sets are beautifully unreal too,

The script, by Jean Aurenche and Pierre Bost  (heroes of Tavernier’s wartime film industry saga LAISSEZ-PASSER, and regular screenwriters for his films) juggles the dark and the light with surprising dexterity and daring. Autant-Lara, late in life, became a far-right member of the European parliament and was successfully sued for Holocaust denial. His writers steer him away from any such monstrosity, But there’s an edgy moment where Gabin is threatened with denunciation by nasty bartenders and then threatens to denounce them in turn for employing a Jewish girl as slave labour. It’s the first strong hint that things are going to turn dark.

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And they do — but this is followed by the worst tacked-on Hollywood ending since UNCLE HARRY. Best to disregard that altogether, which leaves us with a shockingly grim slap-in-the-face of a conclusion. Much better.

Inn Trouble

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on June 6, 2013 by dcairns

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Claude Autant-Lara’s L’AUBERGE ROUGE is unrelated to Jean Epstein’s earlier film of the same name. Now that we’ve got that sorted out, you can head over to The Forgotten and see what the fuss is about. Upon seeing the Autant-Lara, Fiona immediately added it to her favourite films list. We’re also dying to learn anything we can about the anonymous actor cast as the movie’s monkey.

The film is a variant on the Sawney Bean legend, and apparently based on a true case of serial-killing innkeepers in France. The comedy is black, the snowscapes are white, and Fernandel is looking a little off-colour.

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