Archive for Chris Evans

Avengers Disassemble

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2015 by dcairns

age-of-ultron

It’s an enjoyable thing. There’s too much of it, too much bloodless property damage and quips, as before. I miss Loki, I miss the smirking face of evil — when all your baddies are faceless robots, it starves the film a bit, even if James Spader is doing the faceless robot voice. And all the fights seemed to involve everybody, all the time — some smaller skirmishes would have helped a lot. My main memory of the action is a blur of flame and debris and one very funny bit of a giant Iron Man punching the Hulk in the face a hundred times very fast.

ageofu

Writer-director Joss Whedon works hard to make Thor likable and interesting, which previously looked like a challenge. There still aren’t enough female characters and the movie is missing some of the highly paid actresses from various branches of the mega-franchise so it feels like for the first time there are some things Marvel can’t afford to do — they can’t afford to have Natalie Portman and Gwyneth Paltrow turn up at a party scene to tend bar.

There’s nothing as wonderful as Harry Dean Stanton popping up in the first movie for no reason other than that the cinematographer was making a documentary about him.

Oh, about the cinematography. Film 1 was shot by Seamus McGarvey, who did, for instance, the ruthlessly colour-planned WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN. This one is shot by Ben Davis who did the psychedelically garish but still coordinated GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY. So I don’t know what it is — it’s competently shot but the palette is just screamingly LOUD. I guess all those spandex costumes and shiny armours and green skin just won’t BLEND. That poster up top is literally what the film looks like.

But there’s a nice love story, unexpected if you haven’t read the spoilers, and Chris Evans can still be heartbreaking, and there are some eerie quieter moments amid the bombast of Danny Elfman and his back-up orchestra (as near as I can work out, even Elfman at full blast wasn’t loud enough, so they had Brian Tyler provide a whole different score at the same time. I’m pretty sure that’s what they did.) I liked The Vision. Joss Whedon has worked hard to humanize these immortals, even Thor who literally is a god is portrayed as just a nice Aussie bloke, so it’s nice to meet The Vision who is basically an actual god. Not one of us, as Mrs. Thatcher would say.

Schnooks on a Plane

Posted in FILM, literature, Mythology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 19, 2011 by dcairns

In-flight movies — perhaps these are the ultimate justification for Hollywood pabulum. Anesthetic for the tense traveler. When you’re cramped in your seat and anxious about your untenable position hurtling through the stratosphere, it would be nice to be rapt out of yourself by dramatic catharsis, but it AIN’T HAPPENING (although I would welcome with keen interest and incredulity any stories of mid-air catharsis you have to offer) so you settle for the numbing tedium of badly thought-out genre bullshit —

PERCY JACKSON AND THE LIGHTNING THIEF

Not only have they made a Harry Potter rip-off based on a rip-off novel, they’ve got Christopher Columbus who made the first two HARRY POTTER films to direct it. That’s just like stamping the word SAP on the forehead of every child who buys a ticket, isn’t it?

Terrible dross, and all I can say in my defense is that I’m working on a project with some mythological elements so I wanted to see what the kids are thinking about myth these days. Some cute moments — using an i-phone camera to observe the Medusa without getting petrified is neat. Uma Thurman has gone from Venus in BARON MUNCHAUSEN to Medusa in this — a pithier charting of the leading lady’s career arc than even Sondheim has given us.

There’s something irresistibly hilarious about the idea of Pierce Brosnan as a centaur, something the film is completely unaware of. None of the actors playing gods make much impression except Steve Coogan, doing what he does. Zeus is Sean Bean, who made Tolkien sound credible but is screwed when he has to say “You have done well,” as opposed to “Well done.” Look, it’s Kevin McKidd — as with 300, you can’t do ancient Greeks without casting a Scotsman. Now, I’ve never seen a real ancient Greek but I’ve seen the modern variety, several times, and none of them looked like Scotsmen. “It’s the magic of the movies!” you cry.

CAPTAIN AMERICA THE FIRST AVENGER

Perfectly adequate up to the two-third mark: this Chris Evans fellow is quite sweet, and the wimp-to-ubermensch narrative is engaging, the action lucid (oh, you mock Joe Johnston, don’t you, but in his fight scenes you can SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING — feel the nostalgia!) and the supporting players mainly do what they’ve been contracted for. Tommy Lee Jones is gruff, Stanley Tucci is solemn, Toby Jones is short. For a while, Haley Atwell is suitably prim, but when called upon to restage the start of A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, her inability to pull off anything else except pulchritude punctures the pathos. Hugo Weaving provides the entertainment with a Werner Herzog impersonation and hilarious little facial reactions, soon subsumed in a splurge of CG as he rips his own face off to become The Red Skull.

THE INFORMANT!

Continental Air likes to provide a couple of oldies and a couple of indies to its transatlantic clientele, so we get this recent-ish Soderbergh (it was this or GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER? and I was actually up for that, but then I felt that I wanted to actually do it justice). Matt Damon always seemed kind of a schlub-in-the-making, and here he gets to play an actual Philip Seymour Hoffman role, and he’s splendid. I haven’t followed Soderbergh religiously — asides from his Spalding Gray bio last year, AND EVERYTHING IS GOING FINE, I haven’t seen anything since half of THE GOOD GERMAN (it wasn’t good) and bits of OCEAN’S TWELVE. I should catch up sometime, this was funny and clever. Soderbergh’s ludic side (cf SCHIZOPOLIS) is allowed just enough room to breath by the quietly demented voice-over, a calm recitation of delusions, non-sequiturs and stray pub facts.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 600 other followers