Archive for Burl Ives

The Burl Ives Explosion

Posted in FILM with tags , , on June 13, 2022 by dcairns

I am grateful to Ethan Coen for the phrase “the Burl Ives Explosion”.

Snowbound

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , , on December 28, 2015 by dcairns

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In this movie, there’s actually eight!

With Tarantino’s frosty western gorefest about to splatter all over us in glorious 70mm (it opens in the UK while I’ll be busy shooting my own, much, much smaller film), and with this being the season when I quite like looking at snow without having to touch it, I popped Andre DeToth’s DAY OF THE OUTLAW in the Panasonic, wowing Fiona, who is not normally an enthusiast of the oater. “Am I mellowing, or was that really good?” she asked, afterwards.

The story, credited to Philip Yordan (a talented guy, but he fronted for so many blacklistees I’m never sure he’s the actual author), based on a novel by Lee E. Wells, depends on a silly coincidence — plot #1, a standard cattle men versus farmers fight, with an adulterous love affair thrown in, gets interrupted just as the central figures, including tower of spasming muscle and venom Robert Ryan, square off for a climactic duel. Plot #2 now commences, in which this one-horse town is held hostage by Burl Ives and his band of savages, a Quantrill’s Raiders bunch of psychos, introduced by Ives in a cool/scary/hilarious role call.

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This new plot is much more compelling and high-stakes, and it has the advantage of making the rather unappealing antagonists of plot #1 — fuming near-psycho Ryan and peevish Alan Marshal — become relatively sympathetic, so bad are the bad guys and so awful is their new situation.

For people who don’t care for plot, this movie would serve as a good illustration of the value of a strong dramatic situation. As Billy Wilder put it, “A guy comes in the door, you got nothing. He comes in the window, you got a situation.”

DeToth, that fearsome bullet-headed Hungarian cyclops — many Hollywood directors were tough eggs, not many conspired, as DeToth seems to have done, to get his leading man decapitated (on HOUSE OF WAX), benefits from the script, the cast, and Alexander Courage’s glittering music and Russell Harlan’s cinematography. The landscapes are impressive, but so are the compositions for straightforward compositions. Though DeToth is a little happier to hold a flat two-shot than he ought to be, I think, he also delivers packed and dynamic shots that bristle with tension.

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The empty chairs formerly occupied by Tina-Louise’s husband and child earn their place in the shot as a kind of barrier between T-L and RR.

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Snow!

Squint

Posted in FILM, literature, Politics with tags , , , , , , on March 4, 2014 by dcairns

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Enjoyed OUR MAN IN HAVANA, which has some glorious writing and playing and looks absolutely gorgeous, yet oddly the weak point is Carol Reed’s direction — not a very weak point, since in fact much of it is excellent. But he’s devised a system for tilting the camera within a shot, disguised during a track or pan, so we start out even, balanced, and end up canted, askew. This development of his THIRD MAN style oddly does not integrate the dutch angles into the action more smoothly — it makes them pop out more. THE THIRD MAN manages to make its flamboyant visual style seem pretty natural, partly just by using squint angles so often they almost outnumber the straight ones — also, the vast majority of them are POV shots or are positioned like POVs. OMIH manages to make the diagonals work in widescreen, but it doesn’t manage to make them feel logical in the same way.

Reed also reuses a shot of Alec Guinness firing a gun during a climactic scene, in a way that makes no spatial sense and creates a distracting confusion. I don’t know what happened there.

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Production designer Syd Cain smuggles his name onto this Buck Rogers type newspaper strip (click to enlarge).

But Reed does regularly serve up delicious performance moments and has assembled a rather astonishingly far-flung cast who gel beautifully, in defiance of all sense: Guinness, Noel Coward, Ralph Richardson all seem like they would fit naturally in the same film. But then you have to add Burl Ives, Ernie Kovacs, Maureen O’Hara (waitaminute…), John Le Mesurier, Rachel Roberts, Gregoire Aslan, Ferdy Maine… Reed manages to gather Obi Wan Kenobi, the King of Brobdignag and Count Von Krolock together in the same men’s room. The moment where Coward invites Guinness to visit the gents with him, for purposes of espionage, is a bit of an eye-popper.

Overall, though, the film impresses because its surface lustre and drolery combine with a tight plot with a strong theme — the theme that everybody running society is principly concerned with a series of arse-covering exercises, and they are honoured not for results produced but for successful buttock concealment. On top of that, largely through Burl Ives’ magnificent characterisation, the film has access to an emotional depth not usually associated with satire. Its range is as wide as it could ever be.

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More dutch tilts shortly!