Archive for Billy Bevan

The Sunday Intertitle: A Change from Chaplin

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , on June 27, 2021 by dcairns

Dave Glass, who brought us/me the outstanding Lupino Lane collection some of you asked about, is e’en now hard at work on the follow-up, detailing the Sennett comedies of Billy Bevan in the twenties.

It promises to be hot stuff — if you’d like to invest via Kickstarter to secure your own copy —

Here’s the link.

The Sunday Intertitle: Time And Relative Dimensions In Cow

Posted in FILM, Politics with tags , , , , on November 5, 2017 by dcairns

First time I’ve seen racist language, as opposed to merely racist attitudes, in a Keystone comedy. The offending film is WANDERING WILLIES (1926), starring the Australian Billy Bevan and the Scot Andy Clyde as hoboes on the make. Through contrivances of plot too complicated and demented to go into fully, they’ve disguised themselves as a dead cow and find themselves about to be dismembered and fed to a lion at the zoo by an uncredited and unknown African-American performer.

Is it OK if I call him Mr. Halloran until we know better, or am I being racist now? I don’t mean to be.

I guess the filmmakers would have regarded the language as merely casual, rather than hateful. Same thing, really — casualness in what you call someone denotes lack of respect.

Lots of interesting stuff in the film, including one or two funny moments and Billy Gilbert, if we believe the IMDb, in three roles, not looking like himself in any of them.

I don’t think this is Billy Gilbert, do you? You know, Mr. Pettibone from HIS GIRL FRIDAY, the doctor from COUNTY HOSPITAL, Herring from THE GREAT DICTATOR…

Also the attempt to photograph actors inside a cow is amusing — it seems mighty spacious in there. A bovine TARDIS.


The Empty Bride

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , on April 10, 2017 by dcairns

“An eerie image,” I observed of this shot in Lubitsch’s MONTE CARLO (1930).

“Yeah, an empty bride,” said Fiona.

Bring on the empty brides!

This is one of Lubitsch’s early operetta films and it has a lot to commend it. The empty bride is discovered by extruded turtle/shaved deerhound Claud Allister, who’s expecting to marry Jeanette MacDonald, not a wraith. We then cut to Jeanette catching a train in just a coat and her undies. When the ticket collector expresses surprise, she says “I’ve just come from a wedding,” by way of explanation. To my delight, the ticket man is former silent comic Billy Bevan, Uncle Arn from CLUNY BROWN (my favourite Lubitsch).

It takes a while for an explanation to emerge. Jeanette was on the verge of marrying Allister for his money, except that the dress didn’t fit, which suddenly gave her pause, and caused her to run away (for the third time, in fact) while she had the chance. (Lubitsch’s films with JM nearly always begin with her in undies.)

This is really good writing — the image of the abandoned dress — the image of the fugitive in scanties — the jokes with the discombobulated ticket man — finally, once we’re properly interested, but so entertained we hardly require an explanation, the explanation. Which element came first?