Archive for Bette Davis

Bette’s buttocks

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2018 by dcairns

THE BRIDE CAME C.O.D. is a rambunctious pseudo-screwball, with Bette Davis as flighty heiress and James Cagney as supposedly amiable tough guy, the attempted lightness knocked flying by rambunctious Warner Bros slapstick, the whole movie seemingly targeted at the Davis derriere, undignified recipient of cacti (three times) and catapults (twice). We barely escape the obligatory spanking scene. You marvel at scenarists the Epstein brothers’ ability to resist having Cagney crash his plane into her arse.

Cagney is rendered so obnoxious that the main interest becomes how they can possibly sell a romance, but credit to the writers and actors, they actually manage it, a feat comparable to getting Eugene Pallette airborne, which also happens. William THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER Keighley directs, somehow, with Max Steiner braying in his ear the whole time, his score a Loony Tunes medley of famous themes, which you can distract yourself by naming — once named, each one reveals itself as wholly inappropriate, which never happened in the cartoons. “Oh, Susanna”? But we’re in California!

Max even gets to mickeymouse the sound of cactus spines being extracted from Bette’s bum, which I suppose was a novelty for him. Bette’s declaration of “Either I’m coming down this staircase or Max Steiner is!” is herein answered. Max Steiner is coming down this staircase.

The filmmaking has what they call gusto (nice montages, but we don’t know who did them — Siegel?).

Another first — trailing on the end of that miniature parachute is a miniature Bette. Can’t think of another film where she was rendered as a marionette. It looks to have been tiny. I wonder how detailed?

 

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Bette Davis, eyed

Posted in FILM with tags , , , , , , on October 6, 2018 by dcairns

HUSH, HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE is a lot of nonsense, and a lot of LES DIABOLIQUES repackaged as southern gothic, but it does keep throwing out stunning images.

Agnes Moorehead was nominated for “Most Performance in a supporting Role.”

Bette Davis goes full Bette Davis.

Aldrich’s decision not to show the young Charlotte’s face was a very smart one. It others and monsters her from the start, and saves him having to find a young Bette lookalike. And he didn’t repeat the mistake of casting her daughter in hopes that heredity would see him through.

It’s a film full of LOOKING.

Starring Margot Channing, Melanie Hamilton, Jed Leland, Fanny Minafer, Horace (a leprechaun), Edwin Flagg, Princess Centimillia, Freeman Lowell, Major Max Armbruster, Sweetface and Grandma Walton.

They Annoyed Bette Davis

Posted in FILM with tags on September 14, 2018 by dcairns

This gallery is unavoidably spoiler-heavy, so my way of dealing with that is to warn you, and to not say what films the images come from.

           

I think Bette’s homicidal tendencies onscreen are part of her appeal. In a way it’s surprising it took her so long to start manslaughtering on a really large scale. With Bette, we sense right away that the normal rules for character and actor alike need not apply. (In very few of the above films is she actually punished legally for her killings, though often other methods are used to appease the censor.) And audiences male and female responded with excitement because they could vicariously enjoy behaviour that they could never approve of.