Archive for the weather Category

Projections

Posted in FILM, weather with tags on February 13, 2021 by dcairns

For those of you missing the big screen experience, particularly the celluloid or celluloid-derived kind, I can wholeheartedly recommend lying on your back outdoors when it’s snowing. The white sky becomes a great screen, animated by manic granular white-on-white activity. A bit like the whites in Jim Jarmusch’s STRANGER THAN PARADISE, blown up from 16mm so the grains are like golfballs.

If you turn your face into the wind so the flakes are bombing right at you, it’s a 3D movie.

Of course, I wouldn’t recommend doing it for the full ninety minute feature length. It’s strictly a one-reel experience.

Another form of projection became familiar to all of us in the Trump era: the way he would accuse his enemies of doing exactly what he was doing, so that you could pretty reliably deduce his undiscovered crimes from the things he said about opponents.

Now on my second documentary feature (finishing tomorrow) and it increasingly seems to me that whenever we talk about other people, we’re talking about ourselves. Nearly all my interviewees offered concise self-portraits when asked to talk about the subject of the film. The implications are slightly alarming, not least for me, since I spend most of my time on here talking about other filmmakers, including bad ones…

Above: just about the only frame of the new film I can safely reveal.

Godliness not Gorillas

Posted in FILM, Mythology, Politics, Theatre, weather with tags , , , , , on August 9, 2019 by dcairns

INHERIT THE WIND shows director Stanley Kramer at his best and worst. He’s Mr. Inextricable.

There are some lovely jam-packed compositions, and the elegantly designed title sequence is framed like a proto-Leone western. Welles seems to be in the mix of influences. Exciting to think that Welles may have fed into Leone, indirectly or directly.

There’s one really tasty transition —

Even some of Kramer’s more hamfisted bits of commentary have an impressive shamelessness, like his use of the “justice is blind” motif. But I like the one above best. Since we have a director who can’t stop editorializing, who won’t let story and performances speak for themselves even when they’re very broadly didactic, a moment like the above is helpful precisely because I don’t know exactly what it means. The praying priest’s hands are associated with hellfire because he’s a bigot, I guess. But it’s a little unclear, and a lack of clarity in this hectoring film is like a breath of cool air in a heatwave.

But there’s the problem: neither Kramer nor his scenarists can let the story tell itself, they have to toss in their own marginalia, using, for instance, performance — Fredric March telegraphs blustering foolishness with every hufflepuff — was Erskine Sanford unavailable? Or using Gene Kelly to interject little put-downs in case the creationists managed to sound momentarily coherent or respectable, and then having March huff and puff in response to them.

So, March scowls and beams from under a bald cap and Tracy outacts him at every turn with his elaborate performance of the state of relaxedness. Best perf might be Harry Morgan, purely because he’s not embodying one characteristic. The judge her plays is kind of a heavy in this story, but evidently they didn’t feel comfortable having him be fully corrupt, so he plays it sort of on the fence. Ambiguity in a Kramer film!

It’s a really gripping situation, and we can forgive some of the dramatist’s distortions, though perhaps not his stealing his best lines from the true story and then changing the names to protect… who? Himself?

Sociopolitically, nothing has really changed, has it?

INHERIT THE WIND stars Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde; Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde; Don Lockwood; Darrin Stephens; Col. Potter; General Aldo; Buster McGee; and Elizabeth Tudor.

Monochrome Monsters

Posted in FILM, weather with tags , , , , , , on June 21, 2018 by dcairns

“After all that men could do had failed, the Martians were destroyed and humanity was saved by the littlest things, which God, in His wisdom, had put upon this Earth… Grant Williams and Lola Albright.”

For each film in my Tomorrowsday season I’ll be doing some follow-on viewing. In the case of THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN I figured it was weird that I had no memory of seeing star Grant Williams in anything else. Of course, maybe he was too small for the naked eye, or just hiding behind a barstool or something. I resolved to seek him out.

(I had forgotten about his brief turn in WRITTEN ON THE WIND, which I saw in Bologna last year in a Technicolor print — thanks to David E. for the reminder.)

THE MONOLITH MONSTERS was his follow-on film from TISM, and in terms of his role it’s a bit of a come-down. He plays a staunch geologist with a nice schoolteacher girlfriend (Albright), working in a small California desert community. Although his expertise is called on, and he gets to show a bit of bravery I guess, the film doesn’t supply the kind of destructive testing of character you get in his iconic earlier role. So he just plays it nice in the relaxed scenes and intense in the tense ones. You’d never know what a good actor he can be.   

TISM director Jack Arnold has a story credit on this, but for reasons I don’t know, it’s directed by John Sherwood, a former assistant director who also helmed the Arnold-derived THE CREATURE WALKS AMONG US. (I nearly typed “AROUND US” which would make for a less confrontational movie I guess. It’s late.) Sherwood does a perfectly creditable job, especially with his “monsters.” Actually, the best thing about the movie is the unusual nature of the threat — it’s a Ballardian abstract menace, not monsters at all, but exponentially expanding crystals that can petrify human beings. Sherwood gives the meteor crater where the crystals originate its own signature shot — a menacing slow zoom, not used elsewhere. And the giant crystals are always shot in slomo, like Godzilla or Lou Ferrigno. They mimic icebergs in their constant crumbling, constant regeneration.

Crystals ARE kind of weird things, the way they grow like organic lifeforms. You can see why primitive societies of exotic dancers regard them with awe. These ones definitely don’t have any healing properties, which makes them just like the terrestrial kind. They differ in their Tribble-like propensity for massive population growth, which soon threatens the whole town.

Williams and Albright get able support from Les Tremayne as the town newspaperman — newsies help evacuate the town, proving their vital importance to civilisation. Bu the best acting scene is from B-movie supporting specialist William Schallert. You might say he phones in his performance, since his whole role is to play a weatherman consulted by telephone to find out how long the current rain will last and when it may rain again (the monoliths get nasty when wet — it’s all quite GREMLINSesque, and indeed Schallert would become a regular Joe Dante supporting player). And yet, what a masterclass! Schallert looks out the window to try to make his mind up about the precipitation, and his dithering is so entertaining that the movie doesn’t leave when he hangs up, but stays to watch, awestruck, as he takes a couple of antacid pills — or possibly sedatives. (His performance is so specific we can safely narrow it down to those two options.)

In the end, salt water proves to be the Kryptonite heel of these meteoric menaces, and Grant dynamites a dam in order to flood them with salt water. He has to get the governor’s permission, but the governor can’t be located. Leading to the best line — apart from “Look at the dog – he’s as hard as a piece of granite,” that is. Williams blows the dam and, looking out upon the destruction, muses, “I hope the governor makes the right decision.” I laughed like crazy at this, in genuine admiration at its nerve, but Williams betrays no irony. It’s the fifties. He really does hope the governor makes the right decision.