Archive for the Politics Category

Stone Groove

Posted in FILM, MUSIC, Politics, Television with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 23, 2016 by dcairns

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“Have you seen Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States? It is BRILLIANT!” So said Richard Lester, evincing intense enthusiasm. Stone’s series could almost have been made for Lester, a news junkie with a fondness for uncovering the hidden story around the back of what we think we know.

Stone was in Edinburgh, taking part in a couple of onstage discussions for Edinburgh University with my colleague Jonny Murray, and I attended the first. I must say, he was very generous with his time.

A mass of contradictions: Stone could at times recite complex statistics (whether accurately, I don’t know) and at other times was unable to recall the names of important collaborators (but he’s had a lot of those in his long career). There was a lunch break partway through and Stone was visibly sharper thereafter. One friend made a knowing expression when I mentioned this. A student remarked that he may have been jet lagged and suffering from the pressure change because he kept squeezing his nose. I said there might be another reason for that,

Stone was charming and affable — still, it was notable that usually when asked about collaborators, he gleefully trashed them. He remarked that Anthony Hopkins had the great quality of seeming to think onscreen, the thoughts flickering dimly but perceptinly behind his eyes. “Having worked with him, I’m not so sure what he actually does think.” This was followed by a story about Hopkins’ nerves on NIXON which didn’t make Hopkins sound remotely stupid but made him sound like an anxious actor who had taken on a very familiar character and was struggling to do the voice. Obviously it added considerably to the strain for Stone when Hopkins showed signs of wanting to flee the set…

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A lengthy clip from NIXON was shown in which one could appreciate the precision of much of Hopkins’ impersonation, and the way the screenplay captures the late, disgraced president’s weird, garbled syntax. Over the three hour running time, I’m sure one would come to disregard the lack of physical resemblance and the wandering accent. It’s a mesmerising perf (note to self: watch NIXON). But nobody’s going to top Philip Baker Hall in SECRET HONOR, are they?

There was a fair bit about PLATOON but I always preferred SALVADOR, and it was good to hear plenty about that, too. The scene selected showed an improbable discussion of Robert Capa taking place while a mass corpse dump site is photographed — I recognized Stone’s tendency to overreach and to get very on-the-nose with his dialogue. If you want to make John Savage’s reporter seem a bit like Capa, why not have a discussion about Capa right in the script? Stone was frank and jocular about the way he inserted his lead character — a real person — into every major event in the period, even if he wasn’t there. Lots of good talk about the tension between being a political filmmaker telling true stories, and being a dramatist compelled to make GOOD stories. Stone seemed to jump that fence quite a bit.

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I remember a South American student being offended by SALVADOR because Stone couldn’t even be bothered getting the name of the country right. I’ve read an interview in which Stone said he purposely left off the “El” of El Salvador to make the title more forcibly suggest the protagonist’s salvation. But my student had a point — it’s not very respectful, like leaving out the “New” in New York. In discussion in Edinburgh, Stone actually twice referred to the country as “Salvador,” as if the film and the place had merged in his mind.

Stone defended JFK’s factual basis. My own impression is that the film’s weak domestic scenes and tendency to cliché is a dramatic flaw more serious than any historical distortions. But surely the claim that JFK was assassinated because he planned to de-escalate the Viet Nam War is a dubious one?

Too much stuff about WALL STREET.

Barely a mention of THE DOORS and NATURAL BORN KILLERS, which I see as triumphs for Robert Richardson but problematic pictures for Stone. In a way his uncritical love of Jim Morrison is a problem for the first film, and his love of the serial killers and hatred of everything else is a problem for the second.

 

Two gibes at Quentin Tarantino — Richardson stopped working with stone because he thought U-TURN and NBK were two violent, making his present collaboration with Tarantino ironic (can this be true?). Morricone’s Oscar-winning score for THE HATEFUL EIGHT was “his worst ever” (certainly NOT true, though everyone’s entitled to their opinion).

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Nothing on Stone’s recent features except the WALL STREET sequel, and mention of W. — Stone reckons the financial crash killed the film as nobody wanted to hear that guy’s name (or middle initial). My thoughts on that one are here. I felt the problem was not so much timing as making the wrong film. Bush’s story, told in close-up, can only work as a comedy. He inverts the usual dictum about comedy being long-shot. Here. the long-shot is 9:11 and white phosphorous and Abu Ghraib. The close-up is Bush reading his goat book. As with STRANGELOVE, there is unavoidably ludicrous stuff in his personal story and the concept of an idiot becoming president is simultaneously horrific and silly. Kubrick’s “nightmare comedy” incarnate.

Stone, rightly, was very enthusiastic about The Untold History of the United States, seeing it as a kind of crowning achievement. He didn’t seem interested in TV drama (he tried it with Wild Palms), and his claims of being a dramatist rather than a political filmmaker disappeared when he discussed this project. The thing has flaws — I find the music rather obvious, and the editing sometimes becomes illustrative in a pointless, literal way — the most fleeting reference to Tolstoy will be accompanied by a quick shot of  copy of War and Peace — and then Stone repeats his dodgy faked-Super 8 device from JFK, this time with audio — genuine quotes from historical figures, read by actors, treated with phony audio distortion and crackle to make them sound period. This is dangerous — makes you less inclined to trust the filmmaker. And Stone, who has a great voice for VO, sonorous and incantatory, reads the script like he’s only just been handed it, pausing mid-clause to sight-read the next few words.

But the stories told are all either unfamiliar, so you’re shocked you haven’t heard them, or come at the facts from a different angle so you’re shocked at how they’ve been misrepresented. The “moral dilemma” of Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb is the strongest one, I think, built up to over the first three episodes. The whole idea that it was a choice between invading Japan or forcing their surrender with the bomb is a lie, accepted and folded into history books and then repeated in good faith by those who read and taught the books. I identified with Stone’s opening VO about having been misled in school, because I was presented with the bomb narrative in just this dissembling way.

See this series — we can almost forgive Stone his many sins…

Damn You, Television!

Posted in FILM, Politics, Television with tags , , , , , , , on March 10, 2016 by dcairns

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Now we’re hooked on American Crime Story, AND we have a new series of Better Call Saul to contend with.

Sensibly diverging from the American Horror Story format, ACS benefits from a tighter focus — nothing is permitted which doesn’t further the basic story of the OJ Simpson trial, though as judge and jury discovered to their cost, that means that almost anything happening in twentieth century America can be ruled relevant. Even the future is included, since head writers Larry Karaszewski & Scott Alexander manage to shoehorn the Kardashian family in on the pretext that their dad was OJ’s friends and one of his lawyers. The kids’ glee at their fathers’ meaningless and distressing fame is either the Secret Origin of the Kardashian Family — how they learned the wrong lessons at a damagingly early age, or else it’s proof that the tendency to regard celebrity as equivalent to sainthood was already engendered. O.J.’s acquittal for murdering their mother’s friend would thus seem like ultimate proof of this value system, so that Kim K. can this week dismiss a thoughtful comment by Chloe Grace Moretz with the devastating rejoinder “nobody has heard of you.”

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It’s interesting to me how the show has seamlessly maintained a high standard of writing even when the head writers hand over duties to the B-team (The Knick was also good at this), though I do find the direction slightly more variable. Ryan Murphy favours propulsion, his vigorous camera movements rushing the story onwards. Anthony Hemingway, known for The Wire and whose RED TAILS I thought was really terrible, has a tendency towards slightly meaningless show-off shots, but I found by his second episode I was even enjoying these, The contrast in style between this and his feature film suggests he was really being heavily sat on by George Lucas and his cohorts. And then John Singleton contributes one episode executed in a slick, almost classical manner that looks admirably restrained by comparison.

The idea of cinematic TV is interesting — I wonder if any of these guys would find a natural home on the big screen. Singleton has had the most distinguished career, but it’s been very erratic. The tighter discipline of TV, where the director is more like a studio employee in the old days, choices confined to guiding the actors and placing the camera, may suit such filmmakers better than a medium where they’d be responsible for everything. Although not having George Lucas sitting on you must help too.

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The ensemble here is too good to pick favourites. John Travolta has taken some flack for his expressionist perf, and for looking “like haunted spam,” but I find his choices both bold and amusing. It’s true, he doesn’t quite look human anymore, and maybe he’s adapted to looking like an artfully-chewed pencil eraser by developing a manner of acting — all precise, prissy gestures and words bitten off delicately like umbilici — to suit his new, biomechanical instrument. We will see more of such post-human performances as the twenty-first century nears its apocalyptic climax, an event which will no doubt be documented by American Crime Story around about season 5.

#OscarsSoWhat?

Posted in Fashion, Politics with tags on February 29, 2016 by dcairns

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I usually manage to avoid the Oscars, and feel spuriously virtuous for doing so. This blog is mainly about film, not fashion or liberal politics or clinical psychology, so it essentially has nothing to do with the Oscars. But my friends Donald and Nicola, who have proper jobs and therefore get all the channels, invited us round. Fiona begged off with a mild concussion — debatable whether the Academy Awards might act like the fabled second blow to the head rumoured to cure amnesia — but I have popped around and will thus be live-blogging the event until about 6 am, UK time, if I last that long. Which depends on whether the gin lasts that long, really.

So, tune in as you like and watch this post spread and darken fantastically as the morning wears on.

***

Sky’s red carpet coverage was lacklustre so we’ve switched to E! for the madness. Proper frock analysis from people who don’t know anything about clothes but are willing to try. When you hear actual designers talk they don’t say things like “It’s something you might want to wear in the south of France.

I think I’ll say mean things about their clothes rather than about the clothes of the actors on the red carpet, who are very much in the crosshairs. The plus size model’s dress is described as “pretty.” It’s not pretty, “Startling” might be a fair description. It’s the sort of dress that looks apt to leap at you from a dark alley wielding a blackjack. It’s the sort of dress you might want to wear in the south of Hell.

Ryan Seacrest is wearing Ryan Seacrest. And it doesn’t seem to fit him properly.

***

I don’t think my system can withstand a Kate Winslet acceptance speech. Otherwise I’d be as happy for her to win as anyone.

***

Sky’s title sequence is, almost literally a Technicolor yawn.

***

Opening montage — lots of non-nominated films. They missed a trick — could have intercut Leo catching a snowflake on his tongue (THE REVENANT, featured clip) with Jennifer Jason Leigh doing the same (HATEFUL EIGHT, not featured clip).

***

Every year there’s someone who, when they cut to them in the crowd, causes me to exclaim with terror. Usually it’s Nicole Kidman’s taut, shiny brow. This time I think it’ll be Stallone, cantilevered into his chair like an amber menhir. #OscarsSoOrange

***

Best writing so far: Ryan Gosling & Russell Crowe’s cross-talk routine. Bodes well for THE NICE GUYS.

One of the few lines of text quoted from the Best Original Screenplay winner was “His face changes.” Into what?

Chris Rock’s opening monologue seems to imply that the reason for the diversity controversy this year is that black people no longer have anything serious, like lynching, to protest about. #StopKillingUsChrisRock

***

I think Alicia Vikander has been coached by Kate Winslet. But she got through it FAST, I’ll give her that.

Sky deal with the fact that the American coverage has more commercial breaks, by bringing in a terrible panel.

Seth McFarlane-level lesbian humour from Rock about CAROL.

I experience some actual excitement about Jenny Beavan’s win for MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. She went from doing Merchant-Ivory flicks to this. When she starts talking about the real-world menace to the environment, the orchestra starts playing Ride of the Valkyries and then segue into Que Sera Sera.

Tina Fey does Gracie Allen!

***

Sky’s coverage — any show where they read out tweets should be burned.Including the BBC news.

Lubezki winning for THE REVENENANT seems well deserved. They may have to start calling it the Lubezki Award.

Mrs. Miller won Most Editing. Quite happy about that.

Confession: we paused the live coverage so one of our number could have a cigarette break, so we weren’t quite live until now. Then we were able to fast-forward the ads. “Can we fast-forward the panel too?” “Afraid not. Not unless we go into the future.”

THE REVENANT really should win for sound…

MAD MAX is clearly sweeping the tech awards. Which doesn’t actually bode that well for George Miller. The speechifier seems to be George Miller Jnr.

Quite drunk now.

Wait, what, they have a special Andy Serkis category now? And the Award for Andy Serkis goes to Andy Serkis!

EX MACHINA! Maybe the MAD MAX publicity about how it was all done in camera has backfired. I mean, they win all the technical prizes and then they DON’T win for FX?

From Facebook, yesterday: Ennio Morricone certainly deserves a shelf-full of Oscars. But since THE HATEFUL EIGHT’s score recycles cues from EXORCIST II and THE THING, he should presumably be disqualified on the same rules that prevented Nino Rota picking up a little gold man for THE GODFATHER and Michael Nyman getting nominated for THE PIANO. Or is it time to admit that the Best Music Award is a closed shop open to foreigners only on very special occasions?

Shaun Hughes then reminded me that Jonny Greenwood was victim to a similar stitch-up over THERE WILL BE BLOOD.

Richard Williams didn’t win — but, on the plus side, Richard Williams completed a film, which I hadn’t realized. So, good.

They need to stop with the STAR WARS robots and the minions and the TOY STORY toys. I am becoming misanthropic about things that aren’t even people.

Guy from Weeknd wearing a plaster cast yeti footprint on his head and calling it “hair.”

“Where are you getting these movies from?” Best line of the night, from random black woman in Compton. Very funny segment from Rock. Somehow manages to look like he’s been superimposed, though.

Mark Rylance versus Sylvester Stallone — Gigantic Minimalism vs. Gigantic Manimalism. Yay, Rylance! “He’s just come out of nowhere,” says Nicola. “Yeah, one minute you’re directing the Globe Theatre, the next you’re a success,” I say. I get all the best lines.

Louis CK gives his speech presenting Best Documentary the same way he gives his performance in TRUMBO — like these words have just occurred to him as he’s speaking them. Clearly the best actor on stage tonight.

The jury is now in: Chris Rock terrible. Sky panel agree that Louis CK would make a great host. But — DON’T DO IT LOUIS!

Role call of the Dead! Christopher Lee would have pleased at having Saruman and Scaramanga as the images they chose. And no Dracula.

If you’re going to do a gag about the tiny child presenter not being able to reach the microphone, make sure he can reach the microphone at the end of it.

The one guy they couldn’t quite play off with Ride of the Valkyries is the guy with the film about the Holocaust, but they STARTED!

Lady Gaga song begins, with the camera wavering uncertainly at a window. “What the FUCK is going on?” demands Nicola.

“I imagine there’s going to be some blogging on this,” says Nicola, two minutes later.

Lady Gaga was, rightly concerned about being a pop diva weighing in on a serious issue. And everyone thought she carried it off rather well. And so she appeared at the Oscars and rather blew it. I don’t think you should sing about that subject at a giant white piano in a white suit with giant hair. Might as well go the full Elton John and do it dressed as Donald Duck.

***

Yay Ennio. About the only thing I was excited about.

MANY awkward moments tonight. Ali G. high on the list.

All the directors talk about their social relevance and then Inarritu talks about long takes. They set up to look shallow! And then give him the Oscar! Bad luck, George. Still, I think this was good. Cinema.

#OscarsSoOrange&Teal

Have nothing to say about Best Actress as I didn’t say any of the films. CAROL is the one I feel bad about not seeing yet. If I’d known it had guns and stuff I would’ve gone.

I would much rather Leo won for his funny dance in WOLF OF WALL ST. Or its sequel, WORLD OF WARCRAFT. Good, professional speech. I think I would give him extra points for being more emotional, though. Whereas I would give Kate Winslet points for being less emotional.

It’s almost over! Not nearly drunk enough.

SPOTLIGHT! A surprise. Surprises are good. Not many of those.

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