The Shadowcast: Let’s Get Small

New podcast up!

Fiona and I take a microscopically close look at the TIMELY and IMPORTANT subject of human miniaturization, with a particular focus on THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, FANTASTIC VOYAGE and INNERSPACE. Mike Clelland suggested the middle film, and from there things kind of snowballed. Shout-out to Mike.

Still audibly suffering from slight colds on this one, but the NEXT one was recorded earlier and you’ll hear some seriously bunged-up sinuses on that. Here, we just sound like a sexy, husky couple of Glynis Johnses, than which nothing could be better.

The discussion also encompasses (or brushes past) DOWNSIZING, FIRST PAVILION, BODY TROOPERS, THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN, and there are audio extracts from… well, I’ll let that be a surprise (and perhaps a mystery). Momo the podcat offers his views on the miniature human’s potential as snack.

Annoyed with myself for failing to mention the excellent (if slightly racist) miniaturization joke in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slapstick, which demonstrates the virtue of sandwiching virtually a whole novel between set-up and pay-off (more authors should try that). So I’m mentioning it here.

The 30s novelette He Who Shrank which is quoted from is by Henry Hasse and is worth seeking out online. Other literary works referred to are Richard Matheson’s all-important The Shrinking Man, Isaac Asimov’s Fantastic Voyage II: Electric Boogaloo*, Alice in Wonderland and The Arabian Nights.

The audio mixes at the start and end are designed to make genre fans dance around the room in a gleeful sugar rush. Let us know if this happens. Send photographic evidence.Very small people may already be inside all of us. Is there a message you would like passed on?

*Not its actual title.

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4 Responses to “The Shadowcast: Let’s Get Small”

  1. Besides “The Incredible Shrinking Man” Grant Williams’ claim to cinematic fame is as the gas station attendant deliciously slutty Dorothy Malone picks up in “Written on the Wind.” I wonder if Sirk and “Zug” were inspired by Scottie and his infamous gas station.

    I’m surprised you guys didn’t discuss J.G. Ballard whose favorite movie was “Te Incredible Shrinking Man”

  2. I’m surprised Ballard didn’t mention Grant Williams’ other other claim to fame, The Monolith Monsters, a clear precursor to his The Crystal World.

  3. Randy Cook Says:

    Ten year old Matilda was seven when she saw it. Now she keeps screaming “I was SEVEN!”

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