Magnetic Corps

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I thought Curt Siodmak’s THE MAGNETIC MONSTER was going to be good corny fun, the way BRIDE OF THE GORILLA certainly is — the title promises much. But it’s false advertising, as the film contains no monster, magnetic or otherwise, unless, like THE INVISIBLE MENACE it’s one that doesn’t register on film and stays well away from the main action.

Still, Robert Siodmak’s idiot brother deserves credit for attempting something with a bit more natural dignity than his previous Raymond Burr were-gorilla romp. This one concerns the activities of America’s A-Men, the Atom Men who police crimes of a scientific nature. The premise has potential and the name “A-Men” is amusing in a good way. The stylistic approach is borrowed from all those pseudo-documentaries like G-MEN, which I tend to find stodgy and unappealing, even with the added lift of Anthony Mann directing and/or John Alton lighting. This movie has neither: it has Curt Siodmak directing and steady workhorse Charles Van Enger lighting.

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The ending, filmed in an impressive location — IMDb mentions the McCulloch Plant at Los Angeles International Airport — manages to look properly epic and science-fictional, even with stock-footage explosions spliced in,  but what impressed me most was an appearance by Kathleen Freeman as the A-Men’s switchboard operator. Completely uncredited, the great comedienne has plenty of scenes and lots of dialogue, even if she’s basically only there to make a fat joke about herself. I realized, watching her, that a major problem of 50s sci-fi is the lack of people like Kathleen Freeman in them. I quite LIKE Richard Carlson, but he stepped out of a cookie-cutter at Central Casting, and so did most of the other players. Freeman is both more realistic and more extraordinary — one of those people who makes you smile with every appearance.vlcsnap-2015-05-15-09h24m59s133

REDS UNDER THE BEDROCK

BATTLE BENEATH THE EARTH suffers similarly from a lumpen, authoritarian and plodding sensibility — but it’s actually a British film from the untalented Irish hack Montgomery Tully — some of its interest comes from a deft use of stock footage and bit players to pull off an American setting fairly convincingly. But it’s best trait is the very opening, where a deranged scientist is discovered with his ear to the sidewalk in Las Vegas, raving about some unidentified other moving about beneath the ground “just like ants.” In a phildickian twist, the scientist is both crazy and correct, but Dick would never have settled for a storyline about a rogue Chinese general deploying digging machines to plant nukes under the USA.

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The portrayal of the Chinese baddies isn’t as bad as you might expect — it’s worse, and far crazier. The lead villains are played by Caucasians in yellowface, not because the production wanted to cast movie stars — they’re unknowns — but presumably on the assumption that the Chinese can’t act. Tell that to Chow Yun-Fat, but then retreat rapidly before he punches your face in. Here, Martin Benson tries to suggest foreignness with a clipped delivery that makes him sound like Noel Coward. There are lots of lines about “the gods,” suggesting that screenwriter Chares F. Vetter didn’t know as much about Maoism as he should have.

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The production design is hilarious — papier maché cave walls decorated with Chinese restaurant trimmings, set dressing from a Fu Manchu pic, orientalist nonsense. I like the tacky little calendar fixed to the wall, though — surely the art director was having a laugh. But if you’re a Chinese troglodyte on the wrong side of the world, you probably do want to keep track of the passing of time.

This has been a science fiction double feature for The Film preservation Blogathon, hosted by This Island Rod.

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7 Responses to “Magnetic Corps”

  1. chris schneider Says:

    Somehow, I don’t think that Richard Carlson could stand up to Freeman saying “Round tones!”

    As far as phildickian flourishes and the Chinese are concerned, you should check out a PKD novella entitled “Faith of Our Fathers.” Mao, or something like him, puts in an appearance.

  2. Ah, I’ve never read that one. Dick was all over the map politically, I guess, so some anti-red bits would fit with the overall paranoid tone. Not that being anti-c0mmunist is necessarily crazy… but I always felt more afraid of the bomb than of Moscow.

  3. What David? You don’t know the stock footage source for the ending of THE MAGNETIC MONSTER? … It’s the most clever way to make a ‘big’ sci-fi movie for ten cents that there ever was. I know it’s tempting to slam lowly sci fi pictures — they’re easy targets. I find the frequent lunacy in TMM irresistible: http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s3714magn.html

  4. Glenn — I should have guessed! Since Siodmak had written for Hartl’s previous sci-fi engineering romp, FP1 Doesn’t Answer, he probably thought he was entitled to borrow.

    Now I really want to see Gold, though I guess it’ll be as stodgy as the other civil engineering epics.

    https://dcairns.wordpress.com/2009/02/16/fp1/

  5. “phildickian” — Now that is a cool word. I grew up puzzled by the depictions of Asian men in movies like BBtE. Even worse was what they did in B-grade comic books about Korea and Vietnam. The people were colored like lemonade.

  6. With satanic eyebrows! Which nobody has in real life.

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