Scarf-Face

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS (1928)

THE LODGER (1927)

I don’t think it’s that likely that this is direct influence, but it’s certainly striking. We know all about the influence of the German expressionists on Hitchcock, but I hadn’t heard of him influencing them!

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11 Responses to “Scarf-Face”

  1. David Boxwell Says:

    Both films take on added resonance and richness when considering Veidt’s and Novello’s “outsider” sexuality. Both films are readily amenable to queer readings. . .

  2. Don’t forget Malcolm McDowell in If. . . !

  3. Lindsay was dreaming of Ivor Novello.

  4. Oh, no! It’s David’s Birthday! Shall we all sing off-key for him?

  5. Hee hee! This will be perfect for my schoolfriend who first got me into the Fab 4.

  6. Then both films must have influenced Randy in “I, Madman”

    Happy birthday!

  7. Thanks!

    Randy’s perf is part of a long tradition, and consciously or not there’s a Paul Leni influence: I’d say the walk derives directly or indirectly from Jack The Ripper in Waxworks. (The Victorians were obsessed with JTR’s walk, theorizing that he wore rubber-soled shoes to move silently through Whitechapel. High-tech gadgetry!)

  8. Novello’s later film with Hitchcock, the little-seen DOWNHILL, is actually much queerer then THE LODGER. All schoolboy honour and stifled homoeroticism…fascinating stuff!

  9. And some good hallucinatory effects, anticipating a lot of later Hitch. Possibly his first serious journey into delirium.

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