Quote of the day: “What do YOU think, Linda?”

This is the BBC

Piece to Camera

The glass teat

Films from Ray Bradbury’s books have generally failed, but the good bits in them are sometimes so good, they justify continued efforts.

In Truffaut’s FAHRENHEIT 451, there’s the Hitchcockian opening, with Bernard Herrmann’s malevolent toytown score, the eerie shots of narcissists in a monorail, and the heartbreaking end. The Book People wander the countryside committing their texts to memory, a community of mad idealists on a doomed quest to preserve human culture, and a soft snow starts to descend.

The snow was a happy accident. It totally makes the scene.

“The little boy is repeating the words of the book, and he’s already making mistakes, and you realise it’s all going to be lost,” recalls cinematographer Nicholas Roeg.

Another happy accident: Mel Gibson’s planned remake so far shows no signs of going ahead! I don’t care too much what Mel does, as long as he leaves that one alone.

In the scene pictured above, Julie Christie, as Linda Montag, watches an interactive TV show. At key moments, the rather queer actors pause in their dialogue, turn to camera and ask, “What do YOU think, Linda?” in a strangely severe way. and she’s supposed to supply some improv dialogue of her own.

“Disturbing television programme!” remarked my friend Kiyo.

And maybe the most prophetic thing in the film…

Advertisements

12 Responses to “Quote of the day: “What do YOU think, Linda?””

  1. Truffaut said he made the one in the glasses look like Chabrol.

  2. Heh. Was Chabrol ever that skinny?

  3. Love that scene. Did I see that Julie Christie played Linda and Clarisse?
    451 F. is a favorite of mine and I didn’t recall that she player both parts!

    thanks for the site

  4. You’re welcome, stick around!

  5. Where can I buy a pair of those glasses?

  6. Join the Army. You’ll get them for free!

  7. Really? I never imagined the armed forces being full of Harold Pinter lookalikes.

  8. This is one of my essential, go-to quotes, used when awkwardly putting someone on the spot trying to get them to engage in a conversation, accompanied by an exaggerated whipping head-turn and direct stare at the person. (I am a bit of a spastic ham-bone at times.) No one ever gets it, so I have to ‘splain this scene to them, generating further awkwardness… now I can just refer them to this post!

  9. Heh. By remarkable coincidence, I’ve just written a piece about obscure go-to quotes which you can watch out for over the next few days.

  10. Haha!! My Movie Lit class and I watched this, and we all cracked up at this scene! XP

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: