Archive for the MUSIC Category

The Mellow Wallpaper

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , , on November 11, 2014 by dcairns

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Who lives in a house like this? If, as Michael Redgrave opines in SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR, certain rooms are felicitous, inspiring particular events to unfold within their walls, for good or ill, then can we doubt that the owner of this apartment will end up with a dagger in his spleen by the final reel? Since the film is a giallo, RED QUEEN KILLS SEVEN TIMES (but who’s counting?), I guess he will.

Apart from their eccentric taste in decor, giallo characters seem united by their unpleasantness — it’s an actual requirement of the genre, or at least a frequent tendency. Since most of the cast are scheduled for horrible bloody murder, I suppose it made sense to view them as disposable, as corpses-in-waiting rather than human beings we might relate to. In some slashers, a modicum of warmth is generated and you may find yourself rooting for the victims against the killer, but generally in the giallo there is the intellectual pursuit of the truth — which will usually turn out to be too ridiculous to ever be guessed — and there is the emotion of shock relating to each savage slaying, but little in the way of sentiment intrudes. I guess the audience would be in permanent mourning if the people were at all appealing.

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Still, a requirement that characters be horrible  strikes me as even more limiting than the more usual requirement that they be sympathetic. Both are unnecessary constraints, and in every case a character should be appealing or otherwise depending on their nature and the intention of the filmmaker. It’s notable that the more successful Dario Argento movies are the ones with more personable leads, because in the context of his kind of movie, that’s a more surprising choice.

Anyhow, apart from its snazzy title and decor, RQK7X has an insistent, jaunty Bruno Nicolai tune which may be my favourite giallo score (why is the music so cheerful? I guess because it’s good that unpleasant fashion designers and models are getting murdered!) and a cute little girl at the beginning who seems to be having the time of her life playing the embodiment of evil or something.

Remember ~

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Stab Me, Sugar

Posted in Dance, FILM, literature, MUSIC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 27, 2014 by dcairns

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Vincente Minnelli’s THE BAND WAGON, which Fiona had never seen, was a big hit with us — viewed with friends Nicola & Donald. It has just enough story — it doesn’t plummet into an endless ballet like AN AMERICAN IN PARIS. Too much narrative might be a problem — musicals seem to exist in an unusual relationship to plot, with progress essentially halting for each number, which freezes a moment of happiness or sadness and extends it and wallows in it. This being a putting-on-a-show story, it has license to depart even further from the spine — especially since, as in most movies where a show of some kind features, the play being staged, inexplicably called The Band Wagon, seems to be a mishmash of disconnected songs, a revue of sorts, even though we’re TOLD it has a story, which is even summarised for us at the start. When you try to make the songs fit the outline, however, you find that they don’t, except the big one ~

The Girl Hunt, choreographed by Michael Kidd, spoofs Mickey Spillane, and allows screenwriters Comden & Green to extend their satiric twinkliness into a song-and-dance for once. We were particularly impressed by the various book titles displayed at the start, (KILL ME CUTIE, STAB ME SUGAR, THE BODY WITHOUT A HEAD) and by the surrealism of it all — it pinpoints the hysterical sense of nightmare that permeates noir, and which usurps any sense of reality in Aldrich’s Spillane adaptation, KISS ME DEADLY, and boils to the surface in the work of David Lynch.

In fact, if The Girl Hunt ballet were somehow to be a new production, everyone would be talking about how it plunders Lynch’s movies for imagery.

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Syd Charisse plays dual roles, like Patricia Arquette in LOST HIGHWAY. “She came at me in sections. More curves than a scenic railway.”

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Giant fireball like in WILD AT HEART — also LOST HIGHWAY, and others. Lynch, on how he got the idea for the exploding shack in LOST HIGHWAY, which seems like a clear echo or the blazing beach house in KISS ME DEADLY: “We had finished at this location, and then I suddenly got this image in my mind, and I called the effects guy over and asked him what kind of really powerful explosives he had. And he said that he had A LOT, but that he could GET MORE.”

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The clue of the shiny rag — obviously a reference to Dennis Hopper’s titular sex-swatch in BLUE VELVET.

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Nothing in this sequence specifically relates to the red room in Twin Peaks… but the general effect evokes it in every way.

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The fight amid the mannequins — now it’s Kubrick and KILLER’S KISS that seems to be the target. The pre-perfectionist Kubrick rather screws that scene up with some egregious eyeline-crossing, causing each piece of store dummy to change direction as it’s hurled. Minnelli and Kidd and Astaire have no such trouble.

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Back to Lynch, with the Greek sculpture and b&w floor irresistibly evoking Twin Peaks again. The palette is different, but you wouldn’t want red curtains in a bathroom — not restful.

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Lynch’s sets don’t usually have this level of stylisation, but in THE GRANDMOTHER he painted all the rooms black and then chalked in the edges in white for an abstract, graphic effect (painting his cast’s skin chalk-white too). Here, the highlight is the minimally-rendered skyscraper, it’s lower storeys obscured by other buildings that aren’t rendered at all.

vlcsnap-2014-10-26-21h21m03s218It’s the cursed ring from FIRE WALK WITH ME!

I guess what this sequence has in common with Lynch and particularly the world of Twin Peaks (returning to out screens next year), apart from some imagery, is that both exaggerate the incomprehensible plotting of the pulp mystery into abstraction — these mysteries can never be solved because their terms aren’t clearly defined. Suspects, clues, leads and corpses multiply absurdly, and Comden & Green mock these conventions by amping them up while Lynch pushes them further in order to enjoy the mysterious as an end in itself.

As I tell my students, never solve an intriguing mystery with a boring explanation.

 

The Sunday Intertitle: Sympathy for Baby Vengeance

Posted in FILM, MUSIC with tags , , , on October 19, 2014 by dcairns

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The baby in question is jazz baby/personality kid Bessie Love, nineteen years old and cute as a great big button, though she is not in fact a large person. Still, if you wore a button the size of Bessie Love you would probably fall over, unless you were Douglas Fairbanks, who fortunately is her leading man in 1917′s REGGIE MIXES IN. Also fortunately, Bessie does not actually play the role of a button.

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The movie is one of Doug’s various meditations on the subject of class in American life, although “meditations” is a funny word to use. Doug doesn’t meditate, he vaults over furniture and punches wrongdoers. Still, this is a serious consideration of the role of class in American life, conducted through the medium of furniture-vaulting and wrongdoer-punching. Doug plays a millionaire playboy who moves into a rough neighbourhood incognito because he’s smitten with capital L for Love. Doug even gets a job as bouncer at the rough Irish dive Love dances at, just to be near her.

The movie features some nice jumping around and some surprisingly brutal fighting. It’s indifferently directed by Christy Cabanne, for the most part, and its attempts to be egalitarian are sometimes decidedly odd — so he can marry Bessie, who is socially beneath him, Doug secretly creates a phony will in the name of her long-lost uncle bequeathing her a hundred K. Now she can marry Doug without seeming like a fortune-hunter! Fraud is so useful to ease social mobility. I’m almost certain Nick Clegg would approve.

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The movie’s trump card is Bessie, who gives a touching performance way beyond what the silly story requires, and Cabanne is at least smart enough to feature her lovely pear-shaped face in plenty of close-ups. Grapevine’s release fo this title is typically fizzy-facky, but just about watchable, and with an unusually fun selection of jazz-age fuzzy warblers on its needle-drop soundtrack — I particularly liked the kazoo and ukulele version of Tannhauser for Doug and Bessie’s first meeting.

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