Play

morgans-creek

I finally decided to get myself a copy of Play-Making, a Manual of Craftsmanship by William Archer — the book Preston Sturges read when he was laid up with appendicitis and which turned him into a creator of Broadway hits the moment he’d devoured the last page. Maybe it’ll do the same for me! (I think he also read Brander Matthews’ guide to writing plays too — and this book is dedicated to BM.)

It’s not hard to see why Sturges would respond to this text — it has a high-flown style which occasionally plunges into comedy to make a point, so that it not only expresses the dramatic principles which the great filmmaker would exploit, but it also occasionally touches on the tone he would use. You can see this in the following passage, I think. Like today’s better screenwriting manuals. Archer begins by establishing the pitfalls of any guide to the craft ~

“There is thus a fine opening for pedantry on the one side and quackery on the other, to rush in. The pedant, in this context, is he who constructs a set of rules from metaphysical or psychological first principles, and professes to bring down a dramatic decalogue from the Sinai of some lecture-room in the University of Weissnichtwo. The quack, on the other hand, is he who generalizes from the worst practices of the most vulgar theatrical journeymen, and has no higher ambition than to interpret the oracles of the box-office. If he succeeded in so doing, his function would not be wholly despicable; but as he is generally devoid of insight, and as, moreover, the oracles of the box-office vary from season to season, if not from month to month, his lucubrations are about as valuable as those of Zadkiel and Old Moore.”

Lucubrations!

One could be mean and say that Robert McKee has in some ways gone beyond anything Archer dreamt of by combining pedantry with quackery (do you prefer the term pedackery or quackantry to describe this hybrid approach?).

I was startled by how familiar was Archer’s definition of drama (“Any representation of imaginary personages which is capable of interesting an average audience in a theater”) — and then I realized that all the insights of Chapter III of Playmaking had been condensed into Chapter 12 of Alexander Mackendrick’s On Film-Making. At least he gives credit, though — the chapter is called William Archer Revisited.

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6 Responses to “Play”

  1. You won’t find anything in Archer about this

  2. Sturges did mention once that a book influenced him greatly – without him having to read it. That said, I’m pretty certain he did read Archer and (especially) Matthews.

  3. It’s true, David E, Archer is mostly silent with regard to “Topic A”. I’ll have to check Sturges on Sturges for what it says about books — I think the American Masters documentary on him does give considerable credit to his hospital reading matter for setting him off on the path of authorship.

  4. And then there was actual life. I trust you’re up on his mother, Mary Desti — Isadora’s pal who “dragged” young Preston “through every goddamed museum in Europe!”

    She was the (ahem) “inspiration” for Mary Astor in The Palm Beach Story

  5. And she gave Isadora the scarf which killed her… and she was one of Aleister Crowley’s “scarlet women.” Crowley detested little Preston on sight, which sounds like the premise for a terrific sitcom. “My Step-Dad, the Great Beast.”

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