An Audience with Joe Dante

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Joe Dante interview, part the second, now online. I think this has some of the best stuff, although I wish there had been time to compliment the man on his episode of THE TWILIGHT ZONE movie, separate parts of which completely freaked Fiona and I out as youngsters.

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5 Responses to “An Audience with Joe Dante”

  1. Tony Williams Says:

    Well, he’s said it. Personal expression is now dead in Hollywood. This interview is both sad and affirming especially since Joe intends to keep on fighting.

  2. It’s something I remember Arthur Penn saying in the eighties. Personal expression is CONTINUALLY dying in Hollywood. It somehow never totally goes away, but it’s certainly been suffering lately.

  3. I hear that the Transformers sequel is the final nail in the coffin.

  4. Tony Williams Says:

    As Bette says in NOW VOYAGER, Why mourn for the moon when we have the stars”, the latter being the best of classical cinema, the achievements of the post-classical era, and the efforts of people like Joe who give us hope.

    When I was in a Cinema and Photography Department in the 1980s, I was marginalized by a wannabee scriptwriter who said we were too near to make any judgments and “people of integrity work in Hollywood.”

    A few, but not everybody now.

  5. As Soderbergh said, “Big films have got to get better.” Unfortunately he made the Oceans films to prove his own point.

    I’m weirdly quite excited about 3D, after seeing Coraline, which isn’t by any means perfect but seems to promise a kind of enchantment that most Hollywood entertainments have been conspicuously failing to deliver. And if 3D catches on more, it might actually spell the death of Transformers-type nonsense. I can’t imagine anybody wanting that kind of thing flung in their face. But then, I can’t imagine anybody wanting it at all.

    At any rate, a shift in fashions would be welcome, because the most positive alternative would be the collapse of the industry as it stands, to be replaced by smaller films made for smaller markets.

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